100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRII

(ERINE TRACK NOTES:
elay Teams To Fly to California

Thinclads Impressive
In Annual AAU Rela

By TOM WITECKI

ack Coach Don Canham an-
iced during the semester break
Michigan will enter both a
and a two mile relay team in
Los Angeles Times Charity
k Meet on February 12.'
he six Wolverines who will
e up the two teams are: Cap-
Earl peardorff, Marsh Dick-
n, Bryan Gibson, Ergas Leps,
, Martin and Toy Seth,
ps, Seth, Dickerson and Gib-
will probably be the makeup
he mile team, with Martin and
rdorff combining with Seth
Leps for the two mile relay.
he six thinclads, along with
ch Canham, will fly round trip
t Los Angeles.
* * ht
ichigan's sensational sopho-

more middle-distance runner, Er-
gas Leps, broke the varsity record
for the 1000-yd. run while com-
peting in the Knights of Colum-
bus Track Meet in Boston last
Saturday.
The Canadian yearling ran the
distance in the time of 2:12.8 to
better the 2:13.0 mark set by Fred
Montour last year. This sparkling
Switch
The Big Ten announced at its
meeting between semesters that
the Conference outdoor track
meet will be held at Michigan
State instead of Soldiers Field
in Chicago, as previously an-
nounced.

SECOND SEMESTER
PIPE SALE

time was only good for third, how-
ever, as Leps' competition was
amongst the toughest in the na-
tion.
Finishing first was Tom Caroll
of Yale in the remarkable time of
2:09.2. Second was Tom Murphy
of the New York Athletic Club.
Latest word on Michigan's soph-
omore hurdler Bennie McRae, is
that he will be out indefinitely
with a cartilage separation in his
chest.
McRae, who was hampered by
injuries several times as gridder
this fall, suffered his latest mishap
while running in practice.
Coach Canham said, "We have
no idea when McRae will be back.
He will definitely notrun-against
Chicago tonight." McRae had
turned in several fine times during
his freshman year and in practice
sessions this winter. He was ex-
pected to be the Wolverines top
hope iri both the high and low
hurdles this winter.
Coach Canham also announced
an open track meet to be held
Saturday, February 20, in Yost
Fieldhouse. This meet will take
the place of the Illinois dual meet,
which has been cancelled.
Besides this open meet, the
Wolverines have just two more
competitive outings before the
Big Ten indoor championships,
and both of them are at Michigan
State.
February 13, the Michigan team
will travel to East Lansing to com-
pete in the Michigan State Relays
and on the 27th of the same
month, they will meet the Spar-
tans in an away dual meet. ,

By JIM BENAGH
Daily Sports Editor
Les Bird and surprising Tom
Robinson led Michigan to some
creditable showings as the de-
fending Big Ten champions open-
ed their 1960 season with the an-
nual Michigan AAU Relays, Jan.
30.
Robinson, who hadn't run com-
petitively since his leg injury last
spring, dashed in near - record
time to win the 60-yd. sprint from
a talented field of entries. His time
of :06.2 was just "a tenth second
off the Big Ten mark he estab-
lished last winter and an equal
margin away from his varsity
record.
All five timers had him a shade
under the :06.2 clocking, despite
the Bahaman's heavily-taped leg.
Only Two Attempts'
Bird leaped 23'11 to win the.
broad jump, even though he took
only two of seven allowed jumps.
The Wolverines, however, had
to share honors with Western
Michigan in the relay events, each
school garnered three of six pos-
sible championships.
Western's Doug Wuggazer out-

raced Michigan ace Tony Seth in
the last half-mile leg of the im-
portant two-mile sllowdown. West-
ern's quartet registered a record
7:45.0 timing.
The Kalamazoo contingent also
boasted victories in the 880-yd.
relay, where it set an American
dirt track record (1:29.6), and in
the distance medley,
AAU Mark
Michigan's wins were in the
mile relay, shuttle hurdle and
sprint midley. In the latter event,
the Wolverine foursome of Brian
Qibson, Leon Cercone, Jeff Engel
and Ergas Leps set an AAU mark
of 3:30.9. The last three runners
are sophomores.
Other.eMichigan winners were
Dick Cephas, 614" in the high
jump; freshman Marv Silliman
in the novice mile; and freshman
Bill Hammerstein in the novice
880.
Sophomore shot putter Ray
Locke was 1 /" short of winning
his event with a 51'4" put and
another soph, Steve Williams tied
Cephas in the high jump but was
given second place because it took
him more jumps to reach the
height (an AAU rule).

25% to 50% OFF
PIPES -RACKS- HUMIDORS - POUCHES
featuring
THE PARKER PIPE BY ALFRED DUNHILL
A $10.00 VALUE- NOW $7.50
Open evenings Mon. thru Fri. 'til 9
PIPE CENTER

-David Giltrow
HURDLERS HUDDLE -- Three of the Midwest's top hurdlers, Bennie McRae, Willie May and
Dick Cephas discuss their favorite sport, May, former Indiana star and Big Ten titleholder, is a
member of the Chicago Track Club, which meets the Wolverines in Yost Fieldhouse tonight.
McRae and Cephas are members of the present lidchigan track team.
DUAL MEET AT YOST FIELDHOUSE TONIGHT:

(.

'Al' Hosts Powerful Chicago Track Club

By TOM WITECKI
Michigan's defending Big Ten
indoor track champions will have
its hands full tonight when it
takes on a powerful Chicago Track
Club squad at 7:30 in Yost Field-

4

I

1209 So. University

NO 3-6236

house.
Wolverine Coach Don Canham
is far from optimistic in discus-
sing his team's chances for a vic-
tory against the strong Windy
City aggregation, which includes
several former Big Ten cham-
pions.
Willie May, former Indiana
star, is just one of the former
Conference titleholders competing
More Sports
Additional sports stories can
be found on pages 2, 3, 4 and 5
of the second section of this
edition.

CC OME

ro)

CH, Hr~

finished ahead of him in the in-
door low hurdle race last winter.
In addition to competing in the
high and low hurdles, Cephas will
participate in the high jump.
Another Michigan hurdler, who
could give May a stiff race to the
tape, is out of action. He is soph-
omore Bennie McRae, who is still
recovering from a cartilage sepa-
ration.
Another champion, who should
be familiar to local fans, is pole
vaulter Mamon Gibson, who cap-
tained the Wolverine squad just
last winter.
No. Pressure
Gibson shouldn't be pressed 'in
his specialty tonight since Michi-
gan has yet to find a pole vaulter
to replace him and the high-fly-
ing Eeles Landstrom, both of
whom graduated last June.
A top Chicago threat is miler
Phil Coleman, who competed for
the U. S. as a steeplechase runner
in the 1956 Olympics. Just last
week Coleman won the Boston

Knights of Columbus mile in the
fine time of 4:07.
Michigan's top threat in this.
race will be junior Dave Martin,
who finished second in the Big
Ten outdoor last spring with a
4:09.8 clocking.
Michigan's Tom Robinson, de-
fending Conference 60 and 300-
yd. dash champion, can expect
some stiff competition from Chi-
cagoan Al Jacobs, who has turned
in several 0:6.3 clockings in the
60-yd race this winter.
In the 300-yd. race, the Wolver-

ine junior can expect to be pushed
by former Purdue star Ron Ether-
ton, who finished third behind
him in the Big Ten meet last win-
ter.
Other Big Ten champions com-
peting for the Wolverines will be
880-yd, champion winner Tony
Seth and broad jump titlist Lester
Bird.
No matter what the outcome is,
one thing is certain, local fans
will be witnessing the finest traclk
meet of the local indoor season,

O N

THE

A A rT

Daily Sports Staff Has
Open Meeting Thursday

for the Chicagoans. May won both
the indoor and outdoor high
hurdle crowns in Big Ten compe-
tition last year. He also won the
lows outdoors last spring.
Tough Competitor
His top Wolverine competitor
will be versatile Dick Cephas, who

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw NO 2-3580
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselots
Sunday morning worship at 9:00, 10:30 &
11:50 FOR THE BIRDS?-Wr. Henry Kui-
zenga, preaching.
Student coffee hours at 11:30-Library Lounge
and Lewis Room.
Grad Group meeting at Pat Pickett's for ad-
dressing flyers at 4:00.
Welcome for new students-7:00-10:00.

THIS WEEK IN THE CAMPUS CENTER
Tuesday 9-11 P.M. Coffee and discussion, 217
S. Observatory.
Monday - Friday 12 noon Luncheon Co-op
meets in student kitchen located on the
first floor of the east wing. All students in-
terested in participating in the Luncheon
Co-op are invited to drop in at noon on any
regular school day. Information may be ob-
tained by phoning the Campus Center, NO
2-3580, or from Terni Huntwork, NO 2-
0073, or from John Knauth, NO 5-8126.
Friday 6:30 Grad Group supper and discussion
-Dr. Donald Merchant and Dr. William
Baker will speak about "Birth of a New
Church."

f

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDEN1
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
David Schramm,. Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship
Services with sermon by the vicar, "The
SPeace of Christ,"
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M. Bible Study
Groups.
Sunday at 6:00 P.M. Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Topic:
Man in Sacred and Secular Anthropology,
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH'
State and William Streets
Services 9:30 and 11:00 A.M. "SNOBS," Dr.
Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Communion service both hours, new members
received at 9:30.
Church School, crib through 9th grade: 9:30-
10:40 and 10:55-12:00.
Student Guild: 7:00 P.M. Open House at 524
Thompson.
Dr. Luchs speaks over WOIA 1290 at 5:45
P.M. Sunday.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
9:30 A.M. Discussion Group
10:30-11:30 A.M. Meeting for worship
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Ernest R. Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Mirnister.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
(American Baptist Student Fellowship)
512 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the Rev. Hugh
D. Pickett, Ministers
SUNDAY-
9:45 A.M. ABSF Student led Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Morning Wor'ship, "Consider
Jesus Christ," Dr. Loucks.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper
7:00 P.M. Report on the International
Student Conference at Athens, Ohio.
THURSDAY-
4:00 P.M. Prayer Group.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor,. NO 3-0698
9:45 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Morning Service.
6:30 P.M. Training Union.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
Cooperating with Southern Baptist Convention.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Mid-week prayer serv-
ice.
Thursday and Friday, 5:15 P.M. Vesper, Lane
Hall.
EVANGEL TEMPLE
(Assembly of God)
409 South Division
Burt Evans, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
C. A, Youth Service 6:30 P.M.
Evangelistic Service 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday: Bible Studyand Prayer 7:45 P.M.
You are most welcome!
"A Friendly Church Where Christ is Preached"
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to students
Church Services at 9:00 A.M. and 11:15 A.M.,
"AllGod's Children Got Rights," sermon
by Dr. Rupert.
7:00 P.M. Listen to recording of Liturgical
Jazz, open house to follow.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 110 N. 4th Ave.
Rev. Raymond Weiss, pastor. NO 3-0348
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship, "Faith's Per-
sonal Aspect." (Nursery provided during
worship hour.)
11:20 A.M. Student Bible Class.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship, "Yokes, Tradi-
tions and the Gospel.,"
Sun., Feb. 14 at 6:00 P.M.-Student's Recep-
tion.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30
P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes in Catholic Doctrine, Philosophy, Church
History, Scripture, Medical Ethics and
Nursing Ethics taught at the Center on
weekday evenings.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion,
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon for
students, followed by breakfast in Canter-
bury House (Morning prayer on first Sun-
day)..
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon (Holy
Communion on first Sunday).
5:00 P.M. Buffet supper in Canterbury
House.
5:30 P.M. Dramatic reading.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-
9:00 A.M. Worship and Communion Serv-
ice,
10:00 A.M. Bible Study: "Biblical Study
of Basic Christian Doctrines."
I11:00 A.M. Worship.
7:00 P.M. Lutheran Students Association
Meeting,
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10:00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. daily, 7 to 9 Monday
evening.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY -
7.30 P.M. Bible Study

I

I

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
7:00 A.M. to 12:00 A.M.
:5t eciaidjnh9it PIZZA
Small Large X-Large
Plain ............$ .30 $ .70 $1.25
(At Omega) ... .35 .75
Pepperoni ....... .40 .85 1.40
Mushroom .........45 .85 1.60
Beef . . . ........ .45 .85 1.60
Sausage ......... .45 .85 1.60
Bacon ........ .45 .85 1.45
Green Pepper,.... .40 .85 1.45
Onion........ . 40 .85 1.45
Super Deluxe ....,....60 1.25 2.00
and
SIRLOIN STEAK 1.35
Includes: potatoes, salad, bread and butter.
BRAKFAST MENU

Do you like sports, like to write/
and like to mingle with famous
personalities?;
Thenayou havethe opportunityj
to do all of these and more by]
simply joining The Michigan
Daily Sports Staff. All you have
to do in order to accomplish this
is, come to the introductory meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
11, which will feature a guest
speaker from the sporting world
to be named in Tuesday's Daily.
-The meeting will be in the Stu-
dent Publications Building, 420
Maynard Street, scene of many
wonderful journalistic experi-
ences, especially in the realm of
sports.
If you thought sports was ex-
citing, interesting, or what have
you, before joining The Daily, you
have an added treat in store for
you once becoming established on
the staff. You will be able to get
the inside story on news right
when it happens, without having
to wait for a radio broadcast or
the following day's paper.
You also have the opportunity
to meet Michigan coaches and
players, talk to them in exclusive
interviews, and get to know them,
and Michigan athletics, intimate-
ly.

The Daily sports staff is fun,
worthwhile, enlightening, and a
good way to get into extracurricu-
lar activities at the University of
Michigan. So, comes one, come all,
there's a wonderful treat in store
for you at The Michigan Daily
sports staff meeting, next Thurs-
day evening at 7:30.

ERNIE HAISLEY
s . ruled ineligible

At DELTA LUNCH
2 eggs, ham, or bacon
juice, toast, coffee
80c
2 eggs, juice, toast,
and coffee
600

At the OMEGA
HOTCAKES
with butter and syrup
35c

lini Track Team Suffers
Heavy Ineligibility Losses

WAFFLES
40c

kelta litnch

Special to The Daily
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The Daily
learned yesterday that four mem-
bers of Illinois' highly touted track
team have been declared ineligible.
Coach Leo Johnson's squad has
been rated, along with Michigan,
as one of the chief contenders for
the Big Ten indoor and outdoor
titles. Last year the Wolverines
won the indoor crown, but the
Illini came back to win the out-
door title.
Those declared ineligible were
Ernie Haisley, Ward Miller,
Johnny Counts, and Lloyd Good-
leigh.

409 E. Jefferson

NO 3-0768

OMEGA RESTAURANT
105 N. Forest Ave. NO 3-7859

Biggest blow to the Illinois
championship hopes was the loss
of Haisley. The thin Jamacian
senior won both the Big Ten in-
door and outdoor high jump titles
last year and was a heavy favorite
to do it again this year.
Haisley also won the high jump
crown at the Pan-American games
in Chicago this summer.
The loss of Miller, a junior, was
another hard blow for 'the Illini.
He had won both the 100 and 220-
yd. dashes at the Big Ten outdoor
championships last spring.
Counts, a star halfback for the
Illini this past fall, was also one of
Coach Johnson's top sprinting
prospects.
Goodleigh, another Jamacian
student, was rated a fine prospect
for both the quarter and half mile.
He, like Counts, is just a sopho-
more.

11

- .

FROM OUR MINES TO YOU - THE FINEST IN DIAMONDS
Robert Haack, Diamond Importers, of Ann Arbor
Bring You Diamond Values from $55 to $85,000

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group, Youth Group,
and Church School,
11:00 A.M. Confinement or Therapy, sermon
by Rev. Edward H. Redman.

J

I

4

Since 1954, we have discovered three South American diamond mines.
Because of this fact, we have eliminated some five middlemen in the
diamond marketing chain. Hence our prices are unbeatable.
Come in and compare the quality and the prices of our
diamonds. Our gemologist and qualified diamond op-

WEATHER
S5-8611

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)

I

9:30 A.M. German Service (1st and 3rd Sun

wI

I

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan