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May 25, 1960 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-25
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'U' Plans Five-Year Outlay Program

Faculty Senate: Its Place in

J

A

Modernization of Facilities Stressed by Officials

f

By Thomas Turner

THE UNIVERSITY'S plans for
future growth are set down in
a five-year, $130 million capital
outlay program, prepared at the
request of the Legislature.
The program would allow for
accommodation of 28,000-30,000
students (in contrast to the pres-
ent 25,000), according to Vice-
President and Dean of Faculties
Marvin Niehuss, but the emphasis
in planning is on bringing the Uni-
versity's facilities "up to date"
rather than on expanding them.
This year's capital outlay bill
will provide for a Physics-Astro-
nomy Institute of Science and
Technology Building, to be built
on North Campus.
A School of Music Building, also
on North Campus, still heads the
request list. The architecture col-
lege is also scheduled to move to
North Campus, and there has been

talk of combining the two units in;
an Arts Center, but this will prob-
ably not be done.
ALSO GIVEN high priority are+
new School of Education and
Medical Science Buildings. These+
are particularly important, ac-
cording to Neihuss, because they;
will free buildings on the central
campus for use by the literary
college.
Other North Campus construe-i
tion is to include: Fluids Engineer-
ing Building (second unit), Math-1
ematics and Computing Center,
Materias and Metallurgy Build-
ing, Engineering Classroom, Li-
brary and Office Building, Uni-
versity Elementary and High
School, Sanitary Engineering Lab-]
oratory and Highway Laboratory.
To be built on the central cam-
pus during the same period are:

Medical Science Building, Dental
Building, Science Building (two
units), Chemistry and Pharmacy
Building, Television Studios, Law
Classroom Building and Public
Administration and Political Sci-
ence Building.
This construction completed, the
music school, education school and
architecture college would be lo-
cated entirely on North Campus.
The medical school would be en-
tirely east of East University Ave.
The engineering college would
be divided between-North Campus
(upperclassmen and graduates)
and central campus (lower class-
men).
.(Administrators disagree pri-
vately as to how complete the
North Campus - central campus
schism should and will be. One
sees inter-campus movement of
students, via shuttle-busses, for

example, as unworkable. There
will sooner or later be a literary
college classroom building serving
North Campus, he believes.)
THOUGH office and laboratory
space is now the University's
most serious physical need, com-
pletion of the five-year construc-
tion program would be impossible
without renewed attention to the
perennial bugaboo, student hous-
ing.
The University is taking ad-
vantage of the present lull in hous-
ing needs to plan carefully for the
new units North Campus develop-
ment will require, according to
Vice-President for Student Affairs
James A. Lewis.
His office is taking a look to
see "what mistakes we have made,'
he said,-Indicating that past con-

ILA

Mee

presented by the University Musical

Society

1960-1961-in Hill Auditorium

CHORAL UNION SERIES
TEN CONCERTS
HILDE GUEDEN . . . Thurs., Oct. 6
Viennese soprano, prima donna of the Metropolitan
Opera, and star of the 1956 May Festival, returns to
perform in recital.
BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA . .. . . Sat., Oct. 29
CHARLES MUNCH, Music Director
VAN CLIBURN . . . Wed., Nov. 2
America's sensational young pianist.
BRANKO KRSMANOVICH CHORUS OF
YUGOSLAVIA . (2:30) Sun., Nov. 6
BODAN BABICH conducts this international prize-
winning chorus of eighty voices in its first tour of
America.
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN . Mon., Nov. 14
Veteran world-famous pianist returns for his tenth
Ann Arbor appearance.

EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
FIVE CONCERTS
JEROME HINES . . . Mon., Oct. 17
American basso of the Metropolitan and La Scala
Opera Companies, and Bayreuth Wagner Festival.
VAN CLIBURN . . . Mon., Oct. 31
The Ann Arbor debut of America's most celebrated
young pianist.
ROBERT SHAW CHORALE
and ORCHESTRA . Thurs., Jan. 12
A favorite event in Ann Arbor's rich music season.
ZINO FRANCESCATTI . Tues., Mar. 21
Foremost violinist returns for sixth appearance in
Hill Auditorium._
CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA OF
AMSTERDAM . (2:30) Sun., Apr. 23
EUGEN JOCHUM, Conductor
ORDER SEASON TICKETS NOW
An unprecedented early heavy sale for both series indicates
that late purchasers will have less choice for locations than
in recent years. Orders are filed in sequence, and will be
filled in the order received. Tickets will be mailed Septem-
ber 15.
CHORAL UNION SERIES
$18.00 - Block A. Few remaining unclaimed
seats in the three center sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$15.00 - Block B. Two side sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$12.00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$10.00-Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13 rows.
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
$9.00-Block A. Three center sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$7.50-Block B. Two side sections on both Main
Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$6.00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$5.00-Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13 rows.
SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS-Beginning September 26 any re-
maining tickets will be placed on sale for single concerts at
$3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, and $1.50.

struction was not always preceded
by such appraisal.
FACTORSt o be taken into ac-
countin the new dorms in-
clude: 1) need for "a more normal
arrangement between men and
women." 2) "the obvious advan-
tage of smaller units." 3) the need
for graduate housing, of a different
sort from that serving undergradu-
ates.
"It's my guess" the current ap-
praisal will "strengthen our feel-
ing" that smaller units are called
for, Lewis said.
Suite - arrangements may be
tried, he said, though students
have expressed no great enthusi-
asm for them.
"Cubicles" may be provided for
graduates, with access to common
kitchens.
Coeducational dining rooms and
lounges may be included.
Thomas Turner is a senior
in the literdry'college and an
English major. He is now con
cluding his year as editor of
The Daily.
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SAM'S STORE

Continued from Page Thirteen
ERE HAS BEEN talk of de-
centralization, Prof. McClusky
said. The Senate now meets as a
whole twice a year, but parts of
it might,meet in between.
None of these changes would be
fundamental; the present Senate
would remain, though perhaps
functioning differently. A plan
calling for greater revision was
first suggested by former SAC
Chairman Prof. Lowell Kelly,
chairman of the psychologyde-
partment, and is currently advo-
cated by Prof. Eastman.
Prof. Eastman's plan calls for
a council of representatives of 50
or 75 members who would be elect-
ed by the University faculty. This
council would meet regularly,
"probably once a month."'Its
members would have time released
from academic work to devote to
Senate affairs.
FROM THIS GROUP would be
chosen a smaller executive
council of five or six that would
meet weekly with the Vice-Presi-
dent and Dean of Faculties, the
highest administrator connected
with the faculty. In this manner
the group would have much better
direct connections with the Ad-
ministration than the present ar-
rangement provides.
This plan would eliminate the
twice-a-year "town hall" meet-
ings of all professors, where, Prof.
Eastman said, little can be ac-
complished and too many mem-
bers must vote on issues they've
never heard about before.
The whole faculty would be told
about the current problems of the
Senate by the elected members,
either in department or college
meetings or through informal con-
versation (perhaps in a faculty
club). If a professor had a strong
view on an issue, he could express
it at the smaller Senate but not
vote.
THIS REVISION, Prof. Eastman
said, would provide, a firmer
basis for faculty communication,
one of the major problems at pres-
ent. The channels for communica-
tion exist now but are not fully
used.
The new Senate would, it seems,
be better informed than the pres-
ent one, and would be more able
to act quickly. On the other hand,
professors not on the new Senate
would probably become less and
less well informed.
The smaller group would sift
through the many generalized
topics now discussed at "town
hall," and would pick out for
consideration only the policies
that affect the University's gen-
eral educational goals. This kind
of discussion generally interests

individual faculty members more,
Prof. Eastman said, and so it
might arouse more interest in
Senate activities..
The new council would have
the further advantage of being
better able to handle the divisions
that now occur between schools
and colleges. As things stand, he
said, a school particularly affected
by a subject is apt to come en
masse and vote as a bloc, and so
is its opposition. The new Senate
could not be packed.
FURTHERMORE, the new group
would be 'more broadly ori-
ented toward the University, be-
cause of its released time from de-
partmental and academic work. It
could resolve any conflicts between
schools, or between individual
schools and the University's over-
all goals.
Objections to this plan seem to
stem from different conceptions of
the Senate's role. Should the Sen-
ate be a more manageable, repre-
sentative body, or a guardian in
which any professor can speak and
vote? And what values does it
have as a symbol of the profes-
sion?
To Prof. George M. McEwen of
the engineering school, the Senate
is a guardian - "a guardian for
faculty rights, faculty needs and
academic policy insofar as they
are not within the provinces of
the schools and colleges."
It is not primarily a legislative
body, though it can have legisla-
tive function. The Senate's main
role should be to watch University
activities closely by committee in-
vestigations reported to the Sen-
ate.
BUT THE SENATE should not
restrict the privilege of voting
any more than it now does. Each
faculty member wants a voice
on the issues close to him, and,
since the Senate is a guardian, "I
think he should have it."
And in the present arrangement,
the fact that all professors can
vote is valuable because it en-
courages them to learn about Sen-
ate affairs, Prof. McEwen added.
"Some believe there exists, by
the nature of the University com-
munity, an antagonism between
the administration and the fac-
ulty, and that the faculty must
have a stronger voice. I do not
share this." He thinks the faculty
participates in decisions on many
other levels and in many other
ways, and moreover the Senate
when it wishes to can have "a
strong voice, as was indicated in
the early fifties."
PROF, MAURER, the Senate
is a symbol of the cooperation
between administration, regents

WILD'S Has the

SPORT

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Pmported
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Plaid

and faculty, and of the common
aims of University academicians.
It is not a delegation of Regents'
and administration's power to the
faculty, he argues, but it sym-
bolizes the "partnership" of the
administration and faculty.
The Senate is the town meeting
of University scholars, Prof.
Maurer believes. University life
has become more and more com-
plex, and attention to extended
activities takes up more and more
time, so that "we no longer have
a community of scholars, but a
collection of scholars."
But even without this com-
munity of scholars, he says, the
Senate has value as a symbol of
the mutual respect and common.
aims of academic people, out of
which grow freedom of expression
and freedom in planning and do-
ing one's work in a sense of in-
terdependence.
Everyone can still attend Senate
meetings, speak out and vote, and
they prize this privilege. Conscious
exercise of this freedom of ex-
pression will provide from the
Senate a greater and greater

number of educational leaders'
that the University will need.
"I've often thought," Prof.
Maurer said, "that every town
should have a freedom hall, where
any group can meet and have its
say regardless whether its views
are popular in the community.
The Senate is ours. There it is, a
great symbol.
"WE SHOULD BE very sure of
what we are doing before we
attempt, in the name of efficiency,
and effectiveness, to reduce its
size. The things wrong with the
Senate today are symptoms that
cannot be treated by merely ex-
perimenting with changes in or-
ganizational dimensions."
Among the several professors in-
terviewed, no one specifically spoke
about faculty control of policy as
opposed to faculty expression and
influence on it. However, it ap-
pears to be a crucial consideration
in deciding what the Senate should
be.
If one believes more faculty con-
trol is a good idea, then it seems
that neither the new Senate plan

nor
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disc

WARSAW
PHILHARMONIC .
WITOLD RowICKI, Music Director
HENRYK SZERYNG,
Violinist . . . .

Wed., Jan. 18

Tues., Feb. 14

"Here is a string virtuoso of consummate technique
and true musical sensitivity." (Boston Globe.)
JUSSI BJOERLING . . Tues., Feb. 28
The great Swedish tenor. Recitals and opera appear-
ances this season climax a remarkable career.

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SI

DALLAS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA . .
PAUL KLETZKI, Music Director

Fri., Mar. 10

TORONTO SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA . . . Wed., Mar. 15
WALTER SUSSKIND, Music Director

W LD
State Street on the Cam1

v

Tickets at UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, Burton Tower

122 E. Washington

1116 S. University
Daily 9 to 5:30

NO 5-6101
Mondays 9 to 8:30

...

'I--II(-,AI\I r)AII V AAAl;A71NIP

NEDNESDAY, MAY 25., 1960

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