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May 08, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
.... ......

SUNDAY, MAY 8, 1960

I' Divides Two
'ith Spartans

ROBINSON, LEPS STAR:
Wolverines Win Track Meet

r~

(Continued from Page 1)
and second and Marshall, trying
to force Holmes, hit him in the
back with his throw. The ball
rolled into short center field and
Holmes came around to score.
Michigan played bobble ball
again in the sixth.
In the seven inning second game
it was Don Lund's turn to con-
tract a case of ulcers.
After scoring two runs in the
bottom of the sixth the Wolverines
moved into what seemed like a
comfortable 6-2 lead. Then things
began to happen.
Opens Seventh
Bill Schudlich opened the Spar-
tans seventh by lining to Roman.
Sartorius followed with a single.
John Hendee then lined a ground
rule double down the left field line
off tiring Michigan starter Dennis
McGinn. Wade Cartwright ground-
ed third to first for the second out
with Sartorius scoring.
Lund sent Jack Mogk to the

bullpen as Dick Golden collected
his fifth hit of the day, a single
scoring Hendee. Pinch hitter Ron
Marlatt followed with a single
moving Golden to third. Another
pinch hitter Jim Kemerling made
the score 6-5 as he singled home
Golden.
Exit McGinn, enter Mogk.
Mogk ended the Michigan night-
mare as he got Wes Klewicki to
force Kemerling at second.
Michigan's leading batsman
Dave Brown (.378) went zero for
six in the two games but easily
won the hard luck hitter of the
day award.

In the first game Brown hit
what looked like a sure homer, but
the stiff winds held the ball up and
it was grabbed by the Spartan left
fielder. In the second game with
the infield in and Roman on third,
Brown hit a scorching liner that
was grabbed by the shortstop, who
then had to have his glove hand
treated in the dugout.
iteven
G.olden ------4 1 3 l

GOOD FOR, FIVE-Quarterback Dave Glinka (23) of the Blue squad waits for halfback Dennis
Fitzgerald .(18) of the Whites, but an unidentified blocker helps Fitzgerald gain five yards. Both
played prominent roles in yesterday's final spring intrasquad game in the Stadium, won by the Blue,
7-0.
Varsity Blue Team Ekes Out 7-0 Win
SBruising Finish to SpringFootball

Even-S

By BILL PHELPS
The Big Ten indoor track
champions came through with an-
other win yesterday as Michigan
busted the Broncos from Western
Michigan, 74-50, in a dual meet
on Ferry Field.
Led by sprinter Tom Robinson
and middle-distance man Ergas
Leps, the Wolverines took nine of
the fourteen events. Had ailing
Tony Seth been able to run, they
possibly could have' won either
the 440-yard or the mile relay (or
both) as well.
The meet started out with Ray
Locke and Terry Travarthen win-
ning first and third places re-
spectively in the shot put. Locke's
best heave was a 50' 6%" effort.
Encousaging Jump
An encouragng mark was the
24' 6%/," leap made by Les Bird in
the qualifying round of the broad
Jump. In order to conserve his
still-recuperating leg, Bird didn't
make any of his alloted final
-round jumps. His prior distance
was a foot longer than the next
best try. Michigan's Jack Steffes
was second with a 23' 4" mark.
On the track, Robinson was
pushed only for the first 40 or 50
yards of his two dash events and
went on to win them quite hand-
-ily. In the century, he ran with
Dick Cephas for the first few
paces but soon had the best of
him and wasn't threatened by
Western's Joel Johnson who pas-
sed Cephas at the 60 yard mark
to finish second. Robinson was
clocked in .09.6.
As the wind and the afternoon
got colder, Robinson moved his
vulnerable leg muscles out of the
blocks and around the turn first
to come home with an eight to
ten yard lead in the 220. Mindful
of the trouble he had with his legs
after running in the cold last
spring, "Robby" responded to his
coaches' "take it easy" as he came
down the stretch 12 yards ahead,
and coasted home in .22.1.
First Win
The first victory for Leps came
in the mile. After letting West-
ern't Art Eversole and Jerry Ash-
more and Michigan's Dave Martin
take the lead for the first three
and one-half laps, he moved into

third place. Only a few strides
behind front-running Eversole, he
and Martin both tried unsucces-
sfully to get by on the turn. In
the final stretch, Lep' rapidly-
becoming-famous final kick sent
him to the tape first; four yards
sooner than Eversole who Passed
Martin again with his last few
steps.
Leps Came back to win a thril-
ling half-mile dual with Doug.
Wuggazer of the losers. In an
event vacated by Tony Seth who
is suffering from the flu, Leps was
Michigan's big hope. Running six
yards back at the gun, he held
his position until starting into the
last turn.
Just a little behind W uggazer
and closer to the rail, he gambled
by trying to pass on the inside,
and although almost forced off
by the first man (who was en-
titled to the, pole position), he
managed to slide through to break
the tape in 1:54.4.
The 440 yielded the Broncos
their only victory besides the mile
relay at the short distances. Here
Bryan Gibson and Len Cercone
tried to catch John Bork, but the
latter's time of :48.7 brought him
in four yards ahead of second-
place Gibson.
Coach Don Canham had great
praise for Bennie McRae who won
thg 120 high hurdles with a bad
back.
He also had praise for Wally

Schaffer who ran the best two-
mile of his life, finishing close to
the winner Eversole.
Another Win
SHOT. PUTT: 1. Locke (M); 2.
Gutowski (WMU); 3. Trevarthen
(M); distance: 50' 6%".
DISCUS: 1, Bushong (M); 2. Spel-
ler (WMU); 3. Gutowski (WMU;
distance: 139'2".
HIGH JUMP: 1. Oliphant (WMU);
2. Williams (M) Cephas (M) (tie);
height: 6' S%".
BROAD JUMP: 2. Bird (M); 2.
Steffes (M); 3. Twomey (M); dis-
tance 24' 6%".
POLE VAULT: 1. Underly (WMU);
2. Lewis (WMU); 3. McNeal (WMU);
height: 13' 6"1.
MILE RUN: 1. Leps (M); 2. Ever
sole (WMV); 3. Martin (M); time:
4:20.7,
440-YARD DASH: 1. Bork (WMU);
2. Gibson (M); 3. Cercone (M);
time: :48.7.
100-YARD DASH: 1. Robinson (M);
2. Johnson (WMU); 3 Cephas,(M);
time: :09.6.
HIGH HURDLES: 1. McRae (M);
2. Cole (WMU); 3. White (WMU);
time: :14.6.
880-YARD RUN: 1. Leps (M); 2.
Wuggazer (WMU); 3. Geist (M)
time:-1:54.4.
220-YARD DASH: 1., Robinson
(M); 2. Cephas (M); 3. Sterling
(M); time: :22.1.
TWO MILES: 1. Eversole (WMU);
2. Ashmore (WMU); 3. Schaffer (M);
time: 9:26.4.
LOW HURDLES: 1. Cephas (M);
2. Chalfant (M); 3. E t h ri d g e
(WMU); time: :24.1.
MILE RELAY: WMU (Smith, Red-
ding, Wuggazer, Bork); 2. Michigan
(Geist, Gibson, Montour, Cercone);
time: 3:24.4.

FIRST GAME
MICH. STATE AB R H E RBI
Holmes, 2b.. ..... 5 1 1 0 0
Schudi'chIb.....4 0 2 0 0
Sartorius, rf...4 0. 1 0 0
Hendee,cof........ 4 0 1 0 0
Riley, It .......... 3 1 0 0 0
Golden, ss........ 2 0 2 0 0
Lumianski, 3b ... 4 0 0 0 0
Monczka,c. ...... 3 0 0 1 0
Sinks, p.......... 4 0 0 1 0
TOTALS ... 33 2 7 2 0
MICHIGAN ABR KH E RBI
Hood,ct..........3 0 0 0
Struezewski, ss .. 4 1 1 1 1
Roman, lb........ 4 0 2 0 0
Brown,if........ 3 0 0 0 0
Franklin,rt.......4 0 1 0 0
Marshall,2b ..... 4 0 0 1 0
Syring,c.........2 0 1 0 0
a-DeLamlIelleure 1 0 0 0 0
Merulo,3b.......2 0 0 1 0
Koch,p..........2 0 0 0 0
TOTALS.......29 1 5 3 1
a-flied out for Syring in the ninth
Michigan~ State . .001 001 000 2 7 2
MICHIGAN ......000 001 000 1 5 3
zB -- Roman. HR - Struczewski.
SB -- Hood, Brown, Merulla, Riley,
Lumianski. LOB - MSU 6, MICHI-
GAN 6.
PITCHING SUMMARY
IP H R-ER BBSO
Sinks(W)..........951-127
Hoch (L).........,.9 72-0 2 S

%o e , as . ....
Lumianski, 3b ... 2
a-Marlatt, r .. 1
Conlon, c.........2x
Monczka, c.......I1
b-Kemerling...... 1
McCook, p........ 1
Kurez,, p..........1
c-Fleser .........1
Klewicki, p.......1
TOTALS.......31

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

- -

a-walked for Lumianski in the sixth
and stayed in the game to play
right field
b-singled for Monczka in seventh
c-struck out for Kurez in the sixth
MICH. STATE AB R H E RBI
Hood, cf..........3 2 1 0
Struczewski, ss ... 4 2 3 0 4
Romanlb........ 4 1 1 0
Brown,if......... 3 0 0 0 0
Frankln, rf....... 2 0 1 0 1
Marshall, 2b....... 3 0 0 0 0
Syringc......... 3 0 0 1 0
Merullo, 3b....... 3 0 0 0 0
'McGinn, p........ 3 1 1 0 0
Mogk, p.......... 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS .......28 6 7 1 5
Michigan State.....000 200 3 3 9 3
MICHIGAN ........102 012 x 67 1
2B - Roman, Hendee. HR - Struc-
zewsld (2). SB -- Brown, Roman,
McGinn, Sartorius. HP - Franklin
(2). LOB - MSU 10, MICHIGAN 9.
PITCHING SUMMARY
IP H R-ER BBSO
McGinn (W) ......6% 9 5-5 5 7
ogk. ..........%. 0 0-0 0 0
McCook (L)...2% 4 3-3 2 1
Kurcz...........2% 1 1-0 1 0
Klewlicki .........1 2 2-1 1 1

By MIKE G1LLMAN
Spring football practice came to
a bruising close for Michigan's
gridders yesterday afternoon as
the Blue team scored early and
hung on for a 7-0 win.
A chilly football afternoon saw
the lowest scoring intra - squad
game in recent memory played be-
fore 3,000 fans.
The game see-sawed around the
midfield stripe with the only scor-
ing coming in the opening minutes
of the second quarter. White quar-
terback Bob Chandler, passing
from his own 26-yard line, had his
toss picked off by Blue end Bob
Johnson who carried the ball to
the 14.
Raimey Stopped Cold
After Dave Raimey was stopped
cold on the first Blue try, Glinka
ran around right end for six yards
to set up the scoring play. He then
tossed to Johnson up the middle.
The big end took-the pass on the
two and dived over for the game's
only tally.
Freshman end Bill Freehan
kicked the extra point. Before the
game, Freehan was named the
winner of the annual Meyer W.
Morton trophy for the most im-
proved player in spring practice.
This was the only break that
either team turned into a score
although there were many oppor-
tunities, includinag four intercep-
tions and eight fumbles by the two
teams.
Test of Quarterbacks?
Expected to be a test of the
prospective quarterbacks, the game
proved little as all performed ade-

F
l
C

quately, but none with any extra
flash and poise. However, hard-
rushing defensive lines kept con-
stant pressure on the signal-call-
ers.
The line work pointed out what
coach Bump Elliott has mentioned
as his big problem area, the lack
of a strong offensive forward wall.
Most of the yardage made was
hacked out by the backfield men
themselves.
Freshman halfback Jack Strobel
proved to be a pleasant surprise as
he played the workhorse role for
the winning Blue team. Strobel's
longest runs were a 14-yard punt
return and an 11-yard jaunt off
guard, but he consistently ground
out short gains for the winners
and showed himself able to go to
the outside.
The only open field running was
on punt returns. In addition to the
one made by Strobel, White full-
back Ken Turead came up with a

beautiful runback in the first half
as he took Reid Bushong's short
kick on the Blue 47 and slashed
back to the 20-yard line for a 27-
yard effort. The scoring chance
was muffed when John Stamos
fumbled while attempting a pass
and the Blues recovered.
The last serious White scoring
thrust came early in the last quar-
ter as Stamos, Rudd Van Dyne and
Tureaud alternated carries from
the White 34-yard line to the Blue
22-yard marker. On fourth down,
Stamos tossed complete to Scott
Maentz for what appeared to be a
first down.
The measurement found the ball
an inch short of the needed dis-
tance and the White team never
got closer than the 34-yard line
again despite the fine running of
Dennis Fitzgerald who ground out
consistent White gains all after-I
noon.

Netters Sink Wisconsin 7-2
To Continue Winning Ways

SEZCOND GAME
MICHIGANE AR R
Holmes, 2b.......3 0
Schudlich, lb .... 4 0
Saertorius, rf, 3b .. 3 2
Hendee, cf.......3 2
Riley,If..........2 0
Cartwright, if .... 1 0w

H
0
2
1
0
"

E
2
1
0
0
0

REI
0
0
0
0
1

---'I

B risson Shows Michigan Way,
As Golfers whin Ohio State

ATTENTION SENIORS .. .

A. -ML X-F -% MLfF Inv a %-.,, w %-.- r F w qw W.V lq-, = w I%_

GRADUATION ANNOUNCEMENTS

Available at FOLLETT'S

322 South State
This WEDNESDAY at 8, HILLEL presents
Dr. Jacob J. Weinstein
Dr.Ja obJ.V~K.A.M. Temple, Chicago
Noted Rabbi, Lecturer, Leader in movements of Integration
and Human Rights
on

I

"THE JEWISH POSITION"
on the subject of
"What's Worth Lving For?
Some Guidelines for the Perplexed of the '6O'b'
Everyone is Welcome B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill St.

i

I

m mmU

SPORT SHORTS:-
Dark Horse
Wins Derby
By The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE - Venetian Way
wrested the lead from the front-
running Bally Ache coming off
the final turn at chilly Churchill
Downs yesterday and went on to
victory in the $158,950 Kentucky
Derby as the favored Tompion
struggled home fourth in the 13-
horse field.
Bally Ache was 7% lengths
ahead of Canada's big horse, Vic-
toria Park.
Victoria Park came from far
off the pace to beat the fading
Tompion by 2% lengths. Tompion,
went off as the even-money choice
of the estimated crowd of 75,000.
Barber Leads
LAS VEGAS-California's Jerry
Barber knocked out a six-under-
par 66 yesterday for a third-round
total of 201 to hold the lead in
the $42,000 Tournament of Cham-
pions at the Desert Inn Country
Club.

By JM IBAID
me at my victory," Brisson said
Joe Brisson, displaying the happily after defeating the cur-
ability which enabled him to place rent top U.S. amateur player.
fifth in the Big Ten last year, The first 18 holes were played
paced the Michigan golf team to a as a best-ball match, the second
15% to 111/ victory over Ohio 18 on an individual basis.
State here yesterday on a cold, With a five under par 67, Bris-
windy day. son and Tom Wilson defeated
In the morning round, Brisson Ohio State's Dick Butler and Bill
Joined teammate Tom Wilson for Moler, who had 77, in the second
a best ball total of 67, then went best-ball match of the day.
on to post an even par 72 in the Nicklaus and teammate Mike
afternoon to defeat Jack Nicklaus Podolski teamed up for another
of Ohio State in a terrific clutch 67, however, as they defeated
performance. Larry Markman and Dick Young-
Nicklaus was anything but a berg by seven strokes, in the first
pushover, however, even against a match.
par round. The well-built redhead, The third match,. although not
winner of last year's National! characterized by low scores, was
Amateur Championship and a closer as Buckeyes Allen Jones
member of the Walker Cup Team, and Frank Carr edged out Bill
held on to the final hole with a Newcomb and Larry White by
36-38-74 against Brisson's 35-37, four strokes with a three-over-par
good for three Michigan points. Wilson, after a first round 74,
"No one was more surprised than fell apart in the afternoon round

as he carded a 49-44 -- 93, his
worst round of the season so far.
Podolski, Big Ten runner-up last
year, had little trouble winning
the match with a 40-42-82, far
below average for him.
In the number three match,
Butler squeezed out a victory over
Markman as he shot a 39-41--84
to Markman's 42-40--82.
Wolverines Youngberg and New-
comb blanked Moler and Jones in
the number four and ive matches
however, to gain back the loss with
interest.
In the final match, Carr de-
feated White, 2-1, when White
ran into difficulties on the back
nine, after a 39 on the front.
MATCH OF THE DAY'
Brisson 553433444-35 545424454-37 72
Nicklaus 354444444-36 455544344-3$ 74

r

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7

By FRED STINHARDT
Michigan's tennis team stayed
on the winning track by dumping
Wisconsin, 7-2, yesterday,
The netters won all three
doubles and four of the six singles
in a match played under threat-
ening skies and in biting winds.
Once again, the winners were
paced by junior Gerry Duble who
waltzed to a 6-1, 6-2 win over
Marty Rubinowitz in number one
singles.
Frank Fulton lost to Al Fraser
of Wisconsin in number two sing-
les 6-1, 6-4. John Wiley, who
teamed with Fulton to win the
number two doubles match later
in the afternoon, won number
three singles, beating Dick Pease
6-3, 6-0.
Tenney Wins1
Sophomore Jim Tenney rolled
over Jerry Rotter of Wisconsin
6-3, 6-0 in number four singles.
Rotter was bothered by a recur-
rence of a rash and later had to
withdraw from number one doub-
les.
Lon Reudisili of Wisconsin had
little trouble with Ken Mike, win-
ning 6-1, 6-1 to take number five

I I

singles for the Badger's second
and fast point of the match.
At number six singles, junior
Bruce MacDonald continued his
steady play, upending Nick Zaw-
acki 6-0, 6-1.
Michigan Sweeps Doubles
On doubles it was all Michigan.
Wiley and Fulton finished their
match, easily whipping Fraser and
Zawacki of Wisconsin 6-2, 6-0 to
take number two doubles.
Shortly thereafter, Tenney and
MacDonald completed their num-
ber three match against Pease and
Reudisili, winning 6-2, 6-2.
This left the number one match
on the court-Dubie and Mike of
Michigan against Rubinowitz and
Dave Rierson of Wisconsin. Mich-
igan won the hard fought first
set 8-6 and then overcame a 1-3
deficit in the second set to walk
off with an 8-6, 7-5 win. To take
the last set, Mike and Dubie won
six of the last eight games.
Monday, the squad will make
up the match with the University
of Detroit which was postponed
by rain on April 21.

II

1

4

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Major
NATIONAL LEA
W L
Pittsburgh .....13 7
San Francisco ..13 7
Milwaukee..... 9 7
Cincinnati .....10 11
St. Louis........ 9 10
x-Los Angeles .. 9 11
x-Philadelphia 12
Chicago........ 6 12
z-Incomplete
YESTERDAY'S RE
San Francisco 6, Pitts
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis
Milwaukee at Chicago
x-Philadelphia 2, Los
(9inrnings)
TODAY'S GAM
St. Louis at Cincinnat
Milwaukee at Chicago
Philadelphia at Los A
Pittsburgh at San Fran

League Standings
GUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
Pct. GB W L Pet.
.650 New York ......10 5 .667
.650 Chicago ........11 6 .647
.563 2 Boston......... 8 7 .533
.416 3! Cleveland....... 9 8 .533
.474 31 Baltimore.......10 9 .526
.450 4 Washington ..., 7 10 .412
.400 5 Kansas City .... 6 11 .353
.333 6 Detroit ......,..5 10 .333
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
SULTS Chicago 6, Washington 4
burgh 5 Cleveland 3, Baltimore 1
Is 2 Boston 5, Detroit 0
(postponed) New York 4, Kansas City 1
Angeles 2 TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Washington
ES Cleveland at Boston
ti Detroit at Baltimore (2)
Chicago at New York

11

GB
2
2
2
4
5
5

NOTICE !
ORIENTATION LEADER
APPLICANTS
The leader training meeting
has been changed from
May 10 to May 17
A list of next fail's leaders
will be in next week's Daily

-the antithesis
of perspicacity. Right?

N0Dfze could save your life.
Worth knowing? Right!

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drowsy no matter how much sleep you get. But safe NoDoz fights this
kind of "hypnosis." Safe NoDoz alerts you with
caffeine--thesame refreshing stimulant i
coffee and tea. Yet non-habit-forming
NoDoz is faster, handier, more reliable.
So to keep perspicacious while you drive,
study, and work-keep NoDoz handy.
The safe stay awake tablet - avalle eveywh. Aern pded of Greve Lsbersatet

Ig

Ten Standings

Lngeles
ilcisco

I

T W L Pct.
Wisconsin...........1 0 1.000
Minnesota........... 5 1 .833
Northwestern........ 2 1 .666
Indiana. ......3 2 .600
MICHIGAN.......... 4 4 .500
Ohio State.......... 1 1 .500
Illinois-.............3 5 .375
Purdue........1 2 .333
Michigan State 2 4 .333
Iowa ............... 0 2 .000
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Michigan State 2-5, MICHIGAN 1-6
Minnesota 4-1, Indiana. 2-2
Northwestern 12-6, Illinois 7-2
Iowva at Ohio State (2), postponed
Wisconsin at Purdue (2), postponed

3
3
3
5
3
3
a

Collegiate Hairstyles
for 1960!:
Featuring:
" THE IVY CUT
r THE HOLLYWOOD
THEHNEW YORKER
* THE FLORIDA
U THE CONSERVATIVE
see our window
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

Union Presents

THE WORD IS WUS 4
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
AUCTION - Mon., May 9 -4 P.M..- Diog 4
Your chance to bid on
1.'Dinner with Professor Beek
2. Two 50-yard-line tickets for
'60 Homecoming Game

These are the silver wings of a
U. S. Air Force Navigator. As a
flying officer on the Aerospace
team, he has chosen a career of.
leadership, a career that has
meaning, rewards and executive
opportunity.
The Aviation Cadet Program
is the gateway to this career. To
qualify for this rigorous and pro-
fessional training, a high school
diploma is required; however, two
or more years of college are highly
desirable. Upon completion of the
program the Air Force encourages
the new officer to earn his degree
so he can better handle the respon.
sibilities of his position. This in.
cludes full pay and allowances
while taking off-duty courses un-
der the Bootstrap education pro-
gram. The Air Force will pay a
substantial part of all tuition costs.
Af ter having attained enough
credits so that he can complete
course work and residence require-
ments for a college degree in 6
months or less, he is eligible to
apply for temporary duty at the
school of his choice.
If you think you have what it
takes to earn the silver wings of
an Air Force Navigator, see your
local Air Force Recruiter. Ask
him about Aviation Cadet Navi-
gator training and the benefits
which are available to a flying
officer in the Air Force. Or fillin
and mail this coupon.
There's a glace for tomorrow'$
leaders an the
Aerospace Team.
A'ir Forc e

I

PARLIAMENTARY

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PROCEDURE
WORKSHOP

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