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May 07, 1960 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I

SATUTRDAY. MAY 7L. 1960r

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CHAMBERS, MOODY, BACON:
Nichols Arboretum Subject to 'Terrible Abuse'

Fitts Tells of New Program
For Advanced Psychology

I
1

By MICHAEL OLINICK
The Arb is in danger.
Professor Walter L. Chambers,
chairman of the landscape archi-
tecture department and director
of Nichols Arboretum, said re-
cently that the 135 acres of land
suffers "terrible abuse" by both
University students and the gen-
eral public.
"It takes two men two days to
pick up the debris from one week-
end," Prof. Chambers complained,
explaining the littering of trash
and the uprooting of plants were
ruining the legitimate use of the
Arboretum.
"It's a collection of plant ma-
terials to see, study, and enjoy,"
he said. "It is not a picnic ground
and is most certainly isn't a place
to find flowers to take home."
Agrees Strongly
C. L. Moody, the superintendent,
who lives in a cottage in the
middle of the Arb, strongly agreed
with Prof. Chambers. "It really is
a terrible abuse."
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
said she has been a personal wit-
ness to abuses of the Arb. "I saw
three boys on motorcycles trying
to storm up the sides of it yes-
terday."
Dean Bacon also sees danger of
winter recreation in the Arbore-
tum. "Anyone who is going to ski
there should just as well stand
out in the middle of State Street
with his eyes closed. It's utter
folly."
Fire Hazard
Prof. Chambers said that the
Arb could not be locked at night
because of the fire hazard of the
railroad which runs close by it.
Since the Arb is on the campus,
the University has the main re-
sponsibility to protect it, but a
large force for that area can not
be maintained. The Ann Arbor
police do patrol the area, but only
in the same proportion as the rest
of the campus.
"I see no great problem in the
Arb situation," Detective Lieuten-
ant George Staunch reasoned,
pointing to a large map showing
the distribution of reported crimes
in this area.
Less Stealing
"We have only had a few larceny
cases and an auto theft in the
past year inside the Arboretum.
I would say that this is below
the minimum crime rate."
Periodically children wander in-
to the Arboretum, but the police
always find them. In the winter
they are often called upon to aid
Former 'U
Teacher Dies
Prof. Albert E. Greene, former
University professor of engineer-
ing, died Monday in his home,
following a heart attack.
Prof. Greene received his Ph.D.
degree in literature from the Uni-
versity in 1895, and his BS in civil
engineering the following year. He
served on the engineering faculty
from 1903 to 1912.

By EDWARD KLINENBERG
"I see a real problem in making
it possible for graduate students
to develop properly with depart-
ments as large as they are," Prof.
Paul Fitts, director of graduate
studies and chairman of the grad-
uate committee said in discussing
the psychology department's new
graduate program.
The tradition of graduate study
has always been independent
scholarship, he added. "This is
clearly becoming more difficult be-
cause of the size of various de-
partments."
"I think we have some rather
exciting answers. We are trying to
provide highly individualized op-
portunities within the framework
of a big department.".
Work Under Experts
The new method is for graduate
students to work under experts
as apprentices instead of working
on a set curriculum, Prof. Fitts
said. A large university, such as
this, offers more talented experts
than smaller schools.
The Institute for Social Re-
search, Mental Health Research
Institute, Engineering Psychology
Group of Willow Run Laborator-
ies, and the Center for Conflict
Resolution all offer graduate stu-
dents opportunities to learn re-
search under expert guidance, he
noted.
Last year, the diversity of the
psychology department was recog-
nized by the graduate commission,
Prof. Fitts related. Divisions of
research interest were also noted,
and all members of the psychology
staff were asked to indicate their
primariy and secondary areas of
research interest.
One from Each Field
"One person from each field of
the psychology department was
appointed to the graduate com-
mittee.
"This committee developed and
introduced the new program last
fall. The course of study for each
student is determined by the stu-
dent himself working with a three-
man committee. The committee is
composed of members of the psy-
chology staff and is chosen by the
student."
The first year of study is utilized
in completing ten basic one-hour
courses, Prof. Fitts explained. If a
student has learned the material

in any of these courses previously,
he may take an examination to
receive credit for them.
"After the first year, the stu-
dent plans his field of study with
the committee members under
whom he will do his graduate
studies."
Ready for Exam
When the student progresses to
the point where he is ready to
take his preliminary examination,
the same committee ptepares and
administers it, he explained. Upon
successful completion of this ex-
amination, the student begins
work on his thesis.
The final step of the student is
to take his doctoral examination,
Prof. Fitts said. This last test is
also worked out by the committee
which has worked with the candi-
date throughout his studies.
"The advantages of a program
like this are many. Each student
is encouraged to follow whatever
course of study or research he
desires. Since the student designs
his own program, it is highly in-
dividualized and specifically tai-
lored to his interests."
Flexible Program
"A program such as this is
highly flexible in the parts of the
research and study can be
switched around or substituted if
necessary. Flexibility is also de-
sirable for transfer students, since
they receive credit for work they
have done in other universities."
This novel program, one of the
first of its kind in the country,
also makes it possible for a stu-
dent to get a degree in social psy-
chology, Prof. Fitts pointed out,
which involves work in two de-
partments.
"Since psychologists are needed
in many areas of technology and
education, it is essential to have
enough trained people to do an
adequate job."
"We think we have a plan that
will work out well with the advent
of bigness and industriality."
DIAL NO 2-6264
LATE SHOW
TONIGHT 1IlP.M.

I

-Daily-Ron Krone
ARB ENDANGERED-Shown above is the Arb as the Universities feels it should look. However,
officials fear the natural beauty of the Arb is being destroyed by vandals and careless students. Prof.
Chambers, Arb superintendent, says two men are needed to clean up the Arb after a weekend. Many
of the trees and flowers in the Arb have suffered considerable abuse.

in toboggan accidents which occur
there.
Not only do the departments of
landscape and architecture, bot-
any. and conservation bring their
classes for instruction, but gradu-
ate students also conduct plant
studies there.
"The Arb is fairly well known,"
he said, "and people come from
all over to see its contents. It is
even listed in some guidebooks."
He went on to say that he had
witnessed a reflection of this in-
terest the other morning. "I was
up there before 8 a.m. and I saw
about two or three dozen people
walking through."
Mentions Sanctuary
Prof. Chambers also mentioned
the bird sanctuary "of no mean
importance" within the Arb.
About 140 species of birds have
been recorded living there. Many
of the trees hold their fruit
throughout the winter so that the
birds may remain all year.
The Arboreum had its start in
1907 with a gift from Walter H.
Nichols, '91, and Esther Connor
Nichols, '94, located on Geddes
Avenue between it and the Huron
River. In 1943 a Detroit power
company gave 36 adjoining acres
to the University.
The Arb contains diversified hill
and valley land, partly wooded
and open. dry and wet. The range
of soil types makes possible about
26 di~Ierent conditions in which
nearly 2,000 species and varieties
of plant material have been
grown or tested.
Garden Established
The peony garden by the Wash-
ington Heights entrance was es-
tablished in 1929 through the co-
operation of Dr. W. L. Upjohn of
Kalamazoo and other peony grow-
ers. It now contains 350 varieties
of Chinese and Japanese peonies.
To Give Talk
:On Athletics
H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler, director
of athletics, will give a talk at the
Athletic Injury Conference at 10
a.m. today in the Athletic Admin-
istration Building on "Rules and
Their Role in Athletic Safety."
A/lendale Studios, Inc.
SCHOOL of BALLROOM
DANCING
Now registering for
Sessions
Adult and teen-age Group
7 Days, starting Thursday
123 E. Washington
NO 2-6539

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM:
Allergy Research Stimulated.
By Professor's Hay Fever

By RALPH KAPLAN
A professor's allergy was one of
the major causes for the present
five-year research program on hay
fever now being conducted at the
University.
When Prof. E. Wendall Hew-
son, of the civil engineering de-
partment, came to the University
from the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology in 1953, he was a
hay fever suffered and interested
in studying its carrier-ragweed.
Prof. Hewson conferred with Dr.
John M. Sheldon of the medical
center, and the two made prelim-
inary plans for a coordinated re-
search program on all phases of
the hay fever problem.
The botany and meteorology
departments were also interested
in the project, and Dr. Edward S.
Epstein of the engineering school
was named co-ordinator, in co-
operation with the public health
school statisticians headed up by
Prof. Richard Remington, who as-
sisted in the designing of the field
experiments.
Received Grant
The University received a grant
from the National Institutes of
Health, and the project, called
Aero-Allergins Research, was
launched in 1955.
Dr. Sheldon is devoting special
attention to the medical portion
of the project. Experiments at the
medical center have included air
chamber tests, research on iso-
lated ragweed plots, and experi-
ments in q wind tunnel.
The air chamber is the mose re-
cent method. It is contained in a
small room and blows the pollen
from the floor to the ceiling.
For several seasons, both the'
meteorologists and botanists on
the project have pollonated rag-
weed in June and tried to deter-
mine the dispersion of pollen from
a known source.
It was discovered that each time
a subject was exposed, he develop-
ed fever symptoms in less time
than in the previous test.
Exposed Subjects
The wind tunnel method ex-
posed the subjects to a field of
pollen blown through the tunnel.
Here, the subjects' reaction de-
pended largely on individual sen-
sitivity.
"A large part of the meteorol-
ogy study is concerned with the
correct sampling methods for de-
termining the amount of pollen
in the air," said Dr. Epstein. "Two

devices currently being used are
the rodobar sampler and the flag
sampler."
Meteorology and botany are re-
lated in their study of the way in
which weather affects the plant
and in turn the patient.
The botany studies are mainly
concerned with the biology of rag-
weed. One such study concerned
the perinnial ragweed, which is
concentrated in Michigan tourist
spots, such as Interlochen, and is
harder to wipe out.

F ~-m-w--~ -~

"Gay,
Exub
DIAL NO 569

Witty,
erant!"
-Cue Mag.

BRYNNER KENDALL

"ONCE MORE WITH FEELING"
SPECIAL FEATURETTE
"PRINCESS MARGARET"

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