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May 01, 1960 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY W

* 5-

s -:crap

Group Dynamics Center
Makes Classroom Study

GIVE STUDENT AID:
World UniversityService To Start Drive

By SUSAN HERSHBERG

v

J-HOP-ThIs year the all-campus tradition may end. Attendance has been getting smaller each
year. Last year, J-Hop lost money. SGC will decide the future of this event this week.
Campus J-Hop Faces Extinction by SGC

By JEROME WEINSTEIN
"Group dynamics work, espec-
ially in the area of. the classroom,
is relatively new," Elmer van Eg-
mond, research assistant at the
University's Center for Group Dy-
namics, said.
He said there can be little doubt
as to the value of group dynamic
studies in the school room. In one
report of a survey of grade school
CORE Plans
Study Group
By MICHAEL OLINICK
The Congress of Racial Equality
is seeking Southern students for
an international action institute
to be held this August in Miami,
Florida.
"Participants will study the
theory of non-violence, but the
emphasis will be upon its practical
application in action situations,"
Gordon R. Carey, organization
field director said.
"Evaluation will be based on
actual successes and failure ex-
perienced in direct, non-violent
projects."'
Trainees in the course will be
expected to put the principles of
non-violence and passive resist-
ance into practice in their own
community, the CORE leader said.
CORE, which has been prominent
in Negro demonstrations in the
South this year, held a similar
institute last summer.
Participants will be limited to
about 30 Negroes and whites be-
cause of the intensive nature of
the training. Applicants for the
program must also waive all rights
to damages against the institute
arising from personal injury suf-
fered as a result of activities
against discrimination.
Tuition for the institute is $150,
but some scholarship aid is being
offered to students.
Miami's city manager M. L.
Reese said he did not understand
why his city had been chosen for
the institute, because an inter-
racial citizen's committee has been
formed there. He said he thought
that progress had been made to-
ward an agreement to end segre-
gation where demonstrations had
been staged in the city.
Union Readies

children made by the Group Dy-
namics Center, a number of sig-
nificant facts about the contem-
porary classroom emerged.
First, there is a definite social
power structure within the class-
room. This power structure was
tabulated in one elementary school
by having students rate their
classmates on a four point scale
indicating the degree to which the
person being rated could influence
others to do what he wanted them
to do.
Have Position
It quickly became apparent that
every student had a position,
whether high qr low, somewhere
in this power structure, and this
position determined how effective
the student was in his dealings
with others.
"There is, in other words," Mr.
van Egmond said, "a definite cor-
relation between a person's learn-
ing ability and his Status in the
social structure.
The implactions of a study such
as this are indeed profound, he
pointed out. The teacher of today
must acquire a new dimension to
his traditional character. He must
not only know thoroughly the
subject he is teaching and be able
to present it in the most effectual
manner possible, but he must also
be somewhat of a social worker
in administering the classroom,
Affect Performance
He'must realize that a child's
relations with his peers, whether
he is liked or disliked for example,
will often affect that child's per-
formance in class.
How to make the teacher aware
of the importance the classroom
has in affecting the student? Mr.
van Egmond explained that "Un-
fortunately, group dynamic re-
ports of this kind as yet are found
in professional journals intended
for other investigators, rather
than for the practical application-
er, the teacher."
Loehr Leaves
For Harvard
This Summer
The History of Art Department
has announced that Prof. Max
Loehr will leave the University
this July to teach at Harvard
University where he will become
the first Abby Aldrich Rockefeller
Professor of Oriental Art.
Prof. Loehr has taught Far
Eastern art here since 1951.
Before -joining the University
faculty, Prof. Loehr, a native of
Germany, was the curator of
oriental art at the Museum Fur
Volkerkunde in Munich.
Prof. Loehr, who received his
doctor of philosophy degree from
the University of Munich in 1936,
went to China in 1941 as director
of the Sino-German Institute in
Peking. He was a professor at
China's Tsinghua University. He
returned to Germany when the
Communists took over.
--

The World University Service
fund drive will begin May 9 and
will last for three days.
WUS works to provide physical
necessities and learning aids to
college students in 41 countries
throughout the world. Its principal
areas of concern are student
lodging, student health, refugee
services and individual aid.
Through contributions of money,
technical assistance, gifts-of food,
clothing and books, WUS helps
students in all parts of the world.
Works with UNESCO
Its stress on cooperative and
self-help techniques in the univer-
sity community received praise
from Jawaharlal Nehru. Spon-
sored by the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations, the National New-
man Club Federation, the United
States National Student Associa-
tion, and the United Student
Christian Council; WUS works
closely with UNESCO in both ex-
tended and emergency relief pro-
gramns.
The last three years have seen
an emphasis on aid to refugees
from Hungary and Algeria, giving
them scholarships, grants and
loans.
To Support TB Center
In Europe, support will go to
WUS's international TB rest cen-
ter in France, to build dormitories
in Greece, and to send students to
American universities on scholar-
ships.
Kay Perring, '60, and Lilykote
Wenner, '60A&D, educational
chairmen for the WUS drive here,
are emphasizing the informative
GI FTS

aspect of the campaign. In addi-
tion to the bucket drive, interna-
tional chairmen of housing units
and student organizations have
been asked to plan programs
around international topics and
problems.,
A meeting of international
chairmen is planned, religious
Ot

groups will hold programs and a
movie showing the work of WUS
will be presented all over campus.
Ann Rosenbaum, WUS repre-
sentative from New York City, will
be on campus to meet with groups
and try to acquaint them with
the many problems of students
overseas.
DO WNT60WN
Lace lavished
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SECOND FLOOR

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A well used, always welcome gift! Choose
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earrings $1-$2
MAIN FLOOR

In 1959 i was moved Irom the«
Intramural Building to the League e e cum m ings
Ballroom. The dance dwindled to
a mere 500 couples, and perhaps Ticket Sales
permanently out of sight.
Tickets for e e cummings' le
Cit Planners ture will go on sale at 8 a.m. to
morrow at the Union Desk.
The lecture, which is the opej
ing event of the Union Creati
Arts Festival, will be held at
"The Architect and the City" pam. May 9 in Hill Hud.
will be the topic of a lecture and cummings, though most famoi
discussion at 3 p.m. this afternoon for his poetry, is versatile as
at Alpha Rho Chi architecture fra- writer. He has written sever
ternity. novels and plays and is a w
Norbert H. Gorwic, senior city known painter. "The Enormo
planner and head of the design Room," his first novel, is one
division of the Detroit City Plan the classics of World War I.
Commission, will be the main cummings at one time put c
speaker. a one-man show of his paintin
Also in attendance will be Prof. throughout the country. He hi
Walter B. Sanders, chairman of since discontinued them in fav
the architecture department. of lecturing.
The timeless beauty of
ARTEMIS
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SUMMER SWEET DRESS
Sheer loveliness and cool comfort in, this print dress
available in blue or green . . . Mothers love it for P.M.

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as I
or
SWEET
THOUGHTSI
Mrs. Stevens
CANDY
20oz.
Gift Box
assorted
or creams
LUXURY
Gift Box
assorted
1 lb. ....1.65
2 lb. ..,..3.25
RED ROSE
Gift Tin
1 lb. . ..1.65
2 lb. .... 3.00
8 oz. Mommy
Assortment
$1.00

wear. $
961--
I .,
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THIRD FLOOR

HANDSOME
HANDBAGS

Grand assortment that has something for the
taste of every Mom . . . straws in summer's
gayest shades, vinyl covered flowers, tapestries
leathers, and fabrics... $3 to 7.95.
MAIN FLOOR
HOSIERY

All Mother's favorite brands
. . . Kayser, Hanes, and
Berkshire . .. 1.35-1.95.

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