100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 28, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSAYa..PRT Slf

TH MC IG N AIYT-TUfA PRT 0llt

A&AU"O"tIA, ll rAAOXJU 40, LVOV

v

Cindermen Eye
Penn Relay Wins

I

i

PROGRAM of the

By BILL PHELPS
After spectacular success last
weekend, the track team from
Ferry Field will defend their 2-
mile relay title and try to pick
up gold watches in five other
races this weekend at the Penn
Relays.
Led by infatigueable Ergas Leps,
who will anchor at least three
teams, the Wolverines will cer-
tainly be a big factor in at least
four races. The finish of the dis-
tance medley event tomorrow af-
ternoon should see Leps either in
the lead or very close to it.
The crew of Brian Gibson, Earl
Deardorff, Dave Martin and Leps
running a quarter-mile, half-mile,J
three-quarter-mile, and mile re-1
spectively took an easy first place
at Columbus last weekend. Dear-
dorff, Michigan's number two or
three half-miler, will yield that leg
to Tony Seth, Big Ten champion
at 600 yards this weekend.
Seth and Leps will be joined
by team captain Deardorff and
last week's surprise, Frank Geist,
in an attempt to defend the title
now held by the Maize and Blue
in the two-mile event. They will
get a stiff challenge from Michi-
gan State, who fell to them at the
Ohio Relays and who will be out
to regain the Penn Relay cham-
pionship they lost last year.
Leps and Deardorff, second and
third in the Big Ten 880 this win-
ter, and Geist, whose determined
running this spring points to him
as a man to watch, might even be
able to back up Seth's running
enough to beat MSU's 7:32.2-best
time of the season.
The mile relay.team of Seth,
Marsh Dickerson, Dick Cephas
and either Gibson or Len Cercone
will face competition which Coach
Don Canham considers "quite
tough,"
Canham figures that "their suc-
cess will depend a lot on who they
draw as opponents in the heat."
A good time there against a fast
I 771---1--L

team would send them into the
finals ready to take on nearly
anyone.
The grouping of Jimn Wyman,
Fred Montour, Dave Martin, and
Leps in the four-mile event is an
unknown quantity as it has seen
no action this year.
The extremely fast trio of Tom
Robinson, Dick Cephas, and Ben-
nie McRae will provide a constant
base to which Canham will add
Jeff Engel and Len Cercone for
the 440 and 880 relays respec-
tively in effort to come up with a
winning total.

SDS 1960 CO

FERE

CE

for HUMAN RIGHTS in the NORTH
April 28-May 1, 1960 Michigan Union NO 2-4431, Ext. 28
THURSDAY, APRIL 28

1 .

Ii

II

I-M

4-7 P.M.
8:30 P.M.
Open to public
Rackham Lecture Hall
10:30 P.M.
FRIDAY, APRIL 29
9 A.M.
10 A.M.

The I-M department is accept-
ing entries for the last two all-
campus sports of the year, tennis
(singles) and horseshoes.
Play starts next Tuesday. Any-
one interested should contact the
I-M department this week.
SCORES
Alpha Kappa Lambda forfeited to
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Tau Delta Phi 7, Phi Delta Theta 3
Alpha Epsilon P1 14, Theta Chi 13
Alpha Delta Phi 6, Sigma Phi Ep-
silon 0
Phi Sigma Kappa 10, Tau Epsilon
Phi 0
Theta Delta Chi 4, Delta Upsilon 4
Chi Psi 14, Theta Xi 13
Lambda Chi Alpha 7, Phi Epsilon
Pn1n
Acacia. 14, Tau Kappa Epsilon 0
Pi Lambda Phi 32, Psi Upsilon 4

Brown Leads 'M' Batters;
Koch, McGinn Top Pitchers

Barry Marshall, hard hitting'
second baseman, has held the lead
in the all important runs batted
in colmn in the latest statistics
released by the Michigan baseball
team.
Marshall, who clouted a long
three-run home run to win the De-
troit game on Monday, picked up
two more RBI's Tuesday in the
Western Michigan game to hold his
slim lead -over slugging third
baseman Dave Brown. Marshall
has 25 while Brown, by virtue of
his big day at the plate against
the Bronco's padded his total to
23.
However Brown still leads the
team in everything else but triples.
That honor goes to shortstop Gene
Struczewski who has accumulated
four.
Brown, who is considered a fine
major league prospect, has six
homers, seven doubles and a lone
triple among his 30 hits for an
TigersLose
To As 3
By The Associated Press
KANSAS CITY - Ray Herbert
cooled off the red hot Detroit bats
last night and the Kansas City
Athletics beat the American League
leading Tigers 3-1.
Harry Chiti, the A's erratic
catcher, drove in the winning Kan-
sas City runs with a single in the
fourth inning off lefty Hank Aguir-
re.
NEW YORK - Big Jim Lemon
cracked a home run with two on
base to climax a -four-run eighth
inning against Whitey Ford as the
Washington Senators came from
behind for a 5-4victory over the
New York Yankees.
* * .
BALTIMORE -- Baltimore's
rookie first baseman Jim Gentile
drove in three runs in an 8-3 vic-
tory over Boston.
PHILADELPHIA - Vern Law
scattered seven hits effectively to
register his third straight pitch-
ing victory without a loss as the
Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Phila-
delphia Phillies 3-2, for the Bucs'
sixth win in a row.
CINCUNNATI -The Milwaukee
Braves, feasting on Cincinnati's
ragged pitching, completed- a
sweep of the two game series by
beating the Reds, 8-5, in a 3 hour
and 12 minutes marathon.
* * *
CHICAGO -- Roger Craig, mak-
ing his initial start, retired the
first 16 batters he faced in clamp-.
ing a four-hitter on the Chicago
Cubs for a 9-4 Los Angeles Dodger
victory.

amazing slugging percentage of
.851.
The pitching honors still re-
main with coach Don Lund's pair
of hard throwing right-handers,
Al Koch and Denny McGinn. Both
have run up four victories while
neither has been tagged with a
loss.
McGinn hasput together a fine
earned run average of 1.39, second
only to Joe Brefeld's 0.75.
AB R H HRRBI Av.
Krefeld ....... 2 1 1 0 0 .50
fanovich . . 1 A eIanAn

I

"4LIL~ I lj .... /
Brown........69
Koch........15
Franklin .....61
Marshall .. . .70
Syring.......55
Struczewski ..72
Roman.......69
Hood .........78
Merulle.......60
DeLamielleure 4
Fead._........24
Marcereau .... 6
McGinn......14
Mogk ..........9
Kucher .......10
Bradshaw .... 1
Fick. ...... I
Kerr...........5
LUakonis ...... 4
Rinckey....... 3
Ziegler........ 2
TOTALS . 636 1

30
4
21
is
5
19
25
27
:10
0
1
1.
S
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
163'

30 6 23 .435
6 0 1 .400
24 0 16 .393
27 2 25 .386
17 0 14 .309
22 1 12 .306
21 1 12 .304
23 0 10 .295
17 4 17 .283
0 0 1 .250
4 0 2 .166
1 0 0 .166
2 0 1 .143
1 0 2 .111
1 0 4 .100
0 0 0 .000
o 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
o 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
199 14 140 .313

COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING
GALORE I !!
Try our 10 Haircutters
- NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre
NO Ww
is the time to
STORE
your
WINTER
GARMENTS
Returned fresh
and clean at the end
of the season.

6:30 P.M.

2 P.M.
4-5:30 P.M.

8:30
Open

P.M.
to public

Registration; housing arrangements (Third Floor Union)
Keynote address: BAYARD RUSTIN: Special Assistant to Martin Luther
King, Jr.
A NEW TIDE IN THE STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM: The Negro Move-
ment for Equality, South and North. Informal off campus coffee hours. Dis-
cussions with leaders of the Southern student movement. Places to be
announced at the Keynote address.
Opening session: Introduction to the work of the conference. Allard Low-
enstein, former president NSA.
THE DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CHANGE
Three simultaneous panels:
No. 1) The Politics of Change
Arthur Johnson, Executive Sec'y., Detroit branch of the NAACP.
John Feild, former director of the Michigan FEPC; Legislative assistant
to Sen. Philip Hart,
Michael Harrington, research staff, Fund for the Republic; contributor
to The Reporter, Commonweal, and other publications.
No. 2) . Change and Role of the Large Institution
Alvin D. Loving, Assistant Professor of Education, University of Michi-
gan at Flint.
Herbert Hill, Labor Secretary, NAACP.
No. 3) Change and the Community Structure
Morris Milgram, President of Modern Community Developers
Mel Ravitz, Department of Sociology, Wayne State University; Detroit
City Planning Commission.
Eleanor P. Wolf, Department of Sociology, the Merrill-Palmer School.
WORKGROUPS (First Meeting)
THE PROBLEMS: WHERE DO WE STAND?
TwelvJ concurrent workgroups on particular problem areas. The focus will
be on, POSSIBILITIES OF STUDENT ACTION in each of the areas consid-
ered. Students will stay in the same workgroup throughout the conference.
Each group will have a professional resource person.
Late registration-Informal get-togethers.
Encampment for Citizenship meeting: Saal Lesser
Faculty meeting: Dr. Morton Sobel, Anti Defamation League
Townspeople meeting
FILMS: "Crisis in Levittown, Pa."
"All the Way Home"
Montgomery Bus Boycott
THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ORGANIZATION OF THE NEGRO COM-
MUNITY. (The adjustment the Negro community has made to de facto
segregation. Political power, economic power, channels of mobility, reward
allocation system; consequences of integration on these structures and the
sources of resistance to change.)
Speakers: Ted Cobb, Deputy Director, Chicago Urban League
Herbert Hill, Labor Secretary, NAACP
Informal coffee discussions
Introductory session. Review of Friday's programs. Remarks: The relation
between theoretical knowledge and social action programs-Eleanor P.
Wolf, Department of Sociology, Merrill-Palmer School.
Curtis Gans, National Affairs Vice-President of the National Student Asso-
ciation, will speak on the sit-in movement and its implications for the
Northern student.
THE DYNAMICS OF ACTION Panel
A general survey of organizations working against discrimination, the tech-
niques they use, the resources they have to offer. Emphasis will be given to
ways for student groups to work with community organizations on the prob-
lems of the community. Speaker: Mrs. Frances R. Cousens, Research Direc-
tor, Michigan Fair Employment Practices Commission.
WORKGROUPS (Second Meeting)
THE PROBLEMS. IMMEDIATE STEPS FOR STUDENTS TO TAKE, LONG
RANGE POSSIBILITIES TO BEAR IN MIND. This second meeting of the
workgroups will consider concrete programs of action, the resources needed
to make them effective, their orgasization, and their relation to other stu-
dent and community activity.
Delegation meetings
Delegations from colleges will assess the relevance of workgroup recom-
mendations to their own campus situation, will discuss priority programs
for the coming year on their campus and particular problems; e.g.,, re-
sources, personnel, etc., with which they need assistance
Students from the University will meet to discuss action program i Ann
Arbor.
Banquet
Speaker: MORRIS MILGRAM, speaking on his interracial Princeton hous-
ing development.
Greetings: Lt. Governor John Swainson
Social
Banquet
Speaker: JAMES FARMER, Program Director, NAACP
Presentation and vote on workgroup and delegation recommendations, and
selection of an inter-college student committee to coordinate future activity.

I

I

I

IP
Koch , ....3
McGinn. ...... 2,
Rinckey .......9
Brefeld ,..... .2
Mogk.......17
Liakonis .... 9 :j
Marcereau .. .15
Kerr ........16Z
Brodshaw .... 33?j

H
30
25
9
9
12
10
11
25
10

BB
21
9
11
8
9
11

sO
31
25
5
11
13
9
9
7
11

W]
4
4
1
1
1
1
0
0
0

L
0
0
0
1
1
1

It's not too late to hop on the right
one-before graduation time.
if you're interested in a business
of your own and no limit on earn-
ings, you should look into the
advantages of a career in life
insurance selling.

i

10:30 P.M.
SATURDAY, APRIL 30
9 A.M.
10 A.M.
2 P.M.
4:15 P.M.
6 P.M.

'MIajor League
Standings

There's a lot that you may not
have realized about this absorb-
ing business. Let us show you
what a career in life insurance
can mean to you.
ROLAND D. BENSCOTER
General Agent
227 Municipal Court Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan
NOrmandy 3-4151
PROVIDENT MUTUAL
Life Insurance Company
of Philadelphia

STORE

NOW -

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Pittsburgh .. 9 3 .750
San Francisco . 8 4 .667
Los Angeles ... 7 5 .583
Milwaukee ..,.. 6 5 .545
St. Louis......5 6 .455
Philadelphia .. 5 7 .416
Cincinnati..4 9 .308
Chicago........ 3 8 .273
YESTERDAY'S SCORES
Los Angeles 9. Chicago 4
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2
Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 5
only games scheduled
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
San Francisco at Los Angeles
only games scheduled
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Detroit.........5 2 .714
New York ,..5 3 .625
Washington «.. 5 5 .500
Kansas City ... 4' 4 .500
Boston......... 4 5 .444
Baltimore ..... 4 5 .444
Chicago ....... 3 4 .429
Cleveland ......2 4 .333
YESTERDAY'S SCORES
Kansas City 3, Detroit 1
Washington 5, New York 4
Baltimore 8, Boston 3
Only games scheduled
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Detroit at Kansas City
Cleveland at Chicago
Boston at Baltimore
Only games scheduled

PAY LATER
Gold Bond
Cleaners
515 East William
Your Campus Cleaner

GB
2
2
3
4
5
GB
14
z
2
2
2
2%~

I

11 i

"Your Best Bet -Call A Vet"
VETERAN"'S CAB
NO 3-4545 NO 2-4477 NO 3-5800
Shuttle Service Between Wayne Metro. Airport and Union
CAB SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports
Callour office for group rates

III

I

i

SUNDAY, MAY 1
12:30-D P.M.

A

STUDENTS ARE INVITED TO REGISTER FOR PART OR ALL OF THE CONFER-
ENCE AT ROOM 3C OF THE MICHIGAN UNION. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF
THE KEYNOTE ALL PROGRAMS WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE UNION-3rd FLOOR

We Go Anywhere

24-Hour Serviee

. . .

r

11

Ill E~i

HOUR
Dry Cleaning
by ARMEN
The Most In Dry Cleaning

Less weight,
less care,
more comfort
in wash'n wear
Start your own COOL wave
(to last all summer) with
one or more of these dunk-
able, drip-dryable, non-
wiltable lightweight suits.
75% Dacron. 25% Cotton

THE WORKGROUPS
(Friday and Saturday, 2-4 P.M.)
The task of the workgroups will be to develop concrete programs of
action. Each of the workgroups is concerned with some area of potential
action on the part of students. The workgroups will suggest specific
programs in these areas and should recommend steps to implement these
programs in as much detail as possible.
These recommendations will be presented to the conference as a whole
for approval at the Sunday session.
Specifically, the workgroups will be concerned with these questions:
1) What are the problems and what is their extent?
2) What are the forces which hinder solution of the problems?
3) What are the concrete possibilities of student action?
The last question will be considered in terms of specific programs:
the form of the action; the manner in which the action is to be or-
ganized; the resources on which the action program will draw.
After the topic heading of each workgroup are listed problems pos-
sibly suited to student action. These items do not constitute an agenda;
they are suggestions, listed in order to delimit the ground each work-
group will cover (either in whole or in part), and to exemplify the level
of specificity on which each group will operate.
WORKGROUP I: INCREASING NEGRO EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
Suggested focus: Canvassing employers willing to hire Negroes to
apply for jobs that are open; educational programs on FEPC and com-
.amnt&filih ,wn.dure. increaing onnortunities for acquiring additional

WORKGROUP V: DIRECT NON-VIOLENT ACTION
Suggested focus: Techniques of sit-in; picketing; running of test-
cases; decorum & procedure; public relations; desirable degree of or-
ganizational structure; etc.
WORKGROUP VI: FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES .
Suggested focus: Coordinated activity over a number of campuses
against national organization to change its policy; encouraging Negroes
and other minorities to seek membership; cooperation between different
fraternities; university action against chapters which discriminate; etc.
WORKGROUP VII: INTEGRATION IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES AND
SOCIAL LIFE
Suggested focus: Encouraging.Negroes to seek positions of leadership
in student activities; establishing interracial clubs and social groups;
kinds of activity useful for promoting meaningful contact between
White and Negro students; etc.
WORKGROUP VIII: DEVELOPING THE ACTION POTENTIAL
OF THE NEGRO COMMUNITY
Suggested focus: Developing awareness of the full extent of the prob-
lem; channels of communication between student groups and the town
Negro community; promoting an action orientation in the Negro stu-
dent; etc.
WORKGROUP IX: HIGHER EDUCATION
Suggested focus: Encouraging Negroes to seek higher education;
providing scholarship aid; combatting quotas in college admission

11

1 1

Ili

II

I

v

I

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan