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April 22, 1960 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-22

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22, 1960

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

22, 1960 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

COLLEGE IOUND-UP:
Williams To Address Mock Convention

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'til 11:30 A.M.

(4

MINNEAPOLIS - Gov. G. Men-
nen Williams will be keynote
speaker at the University of Min-
nesota Mock Democratic Political
Convention, May 13.
Student delegations each rep-
resenting a state, will work on
credentials and rules committees,
set up a party platform and then
elect Democratic presidential and
vice presidential candidates.
In 1956, due to lack of time the
Democratic mock convention.
couldn't decide on a candidate.
The biggest battle was between
Adlal Stevenson of Illinois and
Averell' Harriman of New York.
In 1952, during the Republican
mock convention, President Dwight
D. Eisenhower and Earl Warren
were elected running mates.
The five biggest fields of discus-
sion in the 1956 convention were
foreign policy, national defense,
taxation, agriculture and civil
rights.,
NEW HAVEN, Conn.-Yale Uni-
versity announced Friday that ef-

fective in July, 1961, tuition in
Yale's undergraduate, graduate
and professional schools will be
raised by amounts ranging from
$75 to $350 a year.
The announcement was made in
conjunction with across-the-board
salary increases for instructors
and assistant professors. Tuition
for Yale undergraduates will be
raised by $150, from $1,400 to
$1,550.
The inclusive fee for tuition,
board, room and health charges,
which is now $2,300, will be in-
creased by $250 to $2,550. One Uni-
versity official expected that it
would be the last increase in un-
dergraduate fees for at least five
years.
If the other Ivy League schools
do not further increase their tui-
tion charges, Yale will have the
highest tuition of the eight schools
for this coming 4cademic year.
At the present time, Yale's tui-
tion rate is $1,400. Soime of the
rates for the other Eastern schools

titpSlC SHOPS

--CAMPUS--
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN--
205 , Liberty
NO 2-0675

F-

are: Princeton $1,450; Columbia,
$1,450; the University of Pennsyl-
vania, $1,250 and Cornell, $1,425.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-A group
of Social Relations students at
Harvard University plan to es-
tablish a cooperative house for
convalescent mental patients if
they can obtain a foundation grant
and approval from state authori-
ties.
Approximately eight undergrad-
uates would live with patients
from local mental hospitals this
summer. The purpose of the pro-
ject would be to help people who
are recovering from protracted
mental disorders make a gradual
transition from protected existence
in a mental institution to active
life in the community.
Living in the cooperative home
with students would enable them
to adjust gradually to independent
life, without feeling isolated or un-
wanted.
AUSTIN, Texas - The much
disputed and debated disclaimer
affidavit was officially denounced
at the University of Texas by the
Committee of Counsel on Academic
Freedom and Responsibility.
Members of the Committee com-
posed of professors of law, eco-
nomics, chemistry and journalism,
issued a resolution urging the re-
moval of this part of the National
Defense Education Act on the
grounds that the government
should not try to regulate a citi-
zen's belief.
NEW YORK, N.Y.-New York
University's director of admissions,
Fred E. Crossland, said no qualified
student was denied admission to
a qualified college last fall due to
a lack of facilities:
Crossland said the overcrowd-
ing, if it exists, is in the admis-
sions offices, not in the classrooms.
"Last September, thousands of
additional young men and women
could have been accommodate in
some of the finest colleges and uni-
versities in thecountry," he said.
"Young people and their par-
ents, hearing dire warnings on all
sides, already have begun to press
panic buttons."
Crossland again said there will
be enough space for all qualified
college applicants this fall.
Borne Speaks
On Research,
Birth Trends
"Population Growth and Re-
search" was the topic of a talk
given yesterday at a colloquium
under the auspices of the sociology
department by Prof. W. D. Borrie
of the Australian National Uni-
versity and Princeton University.
Prof. Borrie outlined trends in
population In Australia and in this
country, noting very similar pat-
terns on a graph.
Around the turn of the century,
the birth rate of this country was
low because of economic recession,
he said, but it picked up a little in
the early twenty's. There was no
great change in birth rate until
World War II, when the "baby
boom" occurred.
This boom was caused by many
factors, Prof. Borrie said, among
which were the greater number
of women between the ages of 20
and 24 getting married, and the
trend of couples having children,
earlier.
Because of the high costs of
sending youngsters to college,
Prof. Borrie warned that people
may not be buying so many carsl
and other expensive luxuries.
Thus, the economy of the country
may be endangered.
He advised that the people of
the United States soon must de-
vise a way to keep the population1

from expanding too rapidly.z
Otherwise crowded living condi-I
tiont and economic decline will
result.
Phone NO 2-4786

Engagements

Wessel-Aron
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wessel of
Chicago announce the engagement
of their daughter, Eden Hope, to
Stewart Hill Aron, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Sigmund Aron of Toledo,
Ohio.
Miss Wessel, a graduate of
Stephens College, is now a junior
in the College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts.
Mr. Aron received his BA from
the University in 1958 and is now
a junior in the Law School. He is
affiliated with Phi Epsilon P fra-
ternity and Phi Alpha Delta pro-
fessional law fraternity.
An early June wedding is plan-
ned.
Essay Contest
To Challenge
Student Body
By SUSAN HERSHBERG
All American and foreign stu-
dents interested in the Univer-
sity's international population are
challenged to advance their opin-
ions in an ISA - SGC - sponsored
essay contest.
"Co-sponsorship with SGC is to
emphasize the part of American
students," M. A. Hyder Shah,
president of ISA, reported.
"The InternationalStudent: A
Misfit or a Blessing?" is the topic.
Prizes of $30 and $20 will be
awarded . The International Stu-
dents Association and the Coun-
cil hope to use these essays as re-
flections of student opinions and
guides to future action.
"This is the first time in the
history of ISA that such a contest
has been held," Shah said. "The
idea of this contest came because
the possibilities of exchange of
ideas between American and for-
eign students is untapped. Through
this contest we hope to see if the
position of international students
on campus is meaningful or not."
Entries must be typed double
spaced, in English, and limited to
1500 words. With each must come
a letter stating the student's
name, address, school or depart-
ment, major, minor, and national-
ity. The contest will close at mid-
night May 2.
Entries become the property of
ISA and SGC, not to be returned.
The Board of Judges are Prof.
Marvin Felheim of the English
department, Prof. Marston Bates
of the zoology department, and
Thomas Turner, editor of TheI
Daily.
Send or bring essays to ISA-
SGC Contest in the Student Ac-
tivities Building.
Entries will be used to formu-
late International Center and ISA
opinions and courses of action re-
garding the problems of the in-
ternational student. The winning
essay will be printed in an ISA
brochure and in the "Daily." It
may further be adopted as a state-
ment of general policy.

,.711

I11

_111

! I

HELP WANTED
SUMMER RESORT - WESTERN MICH-
IGAN, WANTED, SPORTS & SOCIAL
STAFF MAN OVER 30 YEARS OF
AGE. If you would enjoy leading
young adult activities, large Michi-
gan Resort-Ranch (23rd season) has
opening for one man over 30. Season
ends latter part September, start as
early as possible. Our guests are,
young adults, 19 to 35. Applicant
should be able to speak to and lead
large groups. MC aptitude important.
One of the following talents desired:
musical instrument, singing, dra-
matics, sports. Interview will be ar-
ranged in Ann Arbor. Please write
promptly to S. L. Winslow, Montague,
Mich. R.R. No. 2. H39
BABY SITTER: for two infants, ex-
perience desired, weekdays, after-
noons, 12 or 1 to 5 p.m. NO 2-7453.
1137
KITCHEN HELP WANTED evenings only
Monday thru Friday. Call Len Gab,
NO 2-3215. H36
SUMMER RESORT LOCATED SOUTH
OF LUDINGTON, MICH. SPORTS &
SOCIAL STAFF, AGE 20 to 35. COM-
BINATION MUSICAL AND SPORTS
ABILITY. If you would enjoy leading
young adult activities, large Michigan
Resort-Ranch (23rd season) has open-
ings on Sports and Social Staff for
single man, age 20 to 35. Season ends
latter part September, start as early
as possible. Sports instructions with
musical talent In Guitar, Drums, Pi-
ano, Saxaphone or Trumpet. Beach
man with life saving certificate need-
ed. Guests are young adults 19 to 35
years of age. You can enjoy com-
plete sports, social program, dancing
and entertainment while being host
to guests. Interview will be arranged
in Ann Arbor for those selected. Write
to S. L. Winslow, R.R. No. 2, Mon-
tague, Mich. H40
USED CARS
'58 RENAULT DAUPHINE. 40 M.P.G.
$300 plus take over payments. S. Ad-
elman. 29447 Fairfax, Southfield. N17
1946 CHEVROLET. 68,000 miles. Good
condition. $90. Call NO 3-829 after
5:30 p.m. N18
BUSINESS PERSONAL
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr Pat-
terson and Auld Co., 1209 South Un-
versity, NO 8-8887. FF99
FOR THE BEST IN MUSIC it's Johnny
Harberd - Bob Elliot - Boll Weevils -
Andy Anderson - Dick Tilkin - Al
Blaser - Kingsmen - Ray Louis -
Larry Kass plus many others. Phone
THE BUD-MOR AGENCY, NO 2-6362
FF100
EUROPEAN TOURS, '60. 45 days, 9
countries including Oberammergau
Passion Play & Olympics, if desired.
All for $705. For details write West-
ropa, Box 2053, Ann Arbor. FF1
BUSINESS SERVICES
SENIORS
Last chance to save up to 50% on
subscriptions to Time. Life, Sports
Illustrated and Newsweek.
Student price Reg. price
1 yr. 2 yrs. 1 yr.
Time .....$3.87 $7.00 $7.00
Life.....4.00 7.00 5.95
Spts. fli. . 4.00 7.50 7.50
Newsweek 3.50 6.00
Call NO 2-3061
Student Periodical Agency
J40
5-4-3-2-1
PREPARE FOR THE BLAST-OFF
THIS WEEKEND
by purchasing your "fuel" at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
"Just two doors from the Blue Front"
J2
BUSINESS SERVICES: A-1 MOVING.
baggage transfer agents. Pick-up and
deliver. Yellow Cab Co. NO 3-2424, NO
8-9382. J39
SPECIAL SALE FOR APRIL ONLY
Compare these 1 yr. Subscription Prices.
Nat'l Our April
Sub. Usual Sale
Magazine Price Price Price
Am Heritage 15.00 12.50 11.50
Audio 4.00 3.00 2.00
Harper's Mag. 600 4.50 3.50
High Fidelity .00 4.50 3.50
Horizons 18.00 15.30 14.30
Reporter 6.00 4.50 3.50
Venture 7.00 4.75 3.00
To order or to request quotations
on any other magazine, call NO
2-3061 before 5:00 P.M.; NO 3-3018
after. J35
Reconditioned Vacuum Cleaners
$15.00 and up
J. LEABU SALES AND SERVICE
322 E. Liberty NO 3-304
J9

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: One pair girl's glasses, black
frames, black case. Lost Saturday aft-
ernoon April 16, in campus town.
$5.00 reward. Phone NO 5-6973 at
mealtime. A43
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Join Grinnell's
Piano Rental Club
Lessons for 30 days,
piano in your home.
First payment $20
after 30 days only $10 per month.
X45
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
(Pick up and delivery)
Bargain on diamond needles-all types
Hi-Fl kits and service
Pre-recorded tapes, 2 and 4 track
Open 10-6 Monday through Saturday
HI-Fl STUDIO
1319 South University
X43
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Orn Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
X
Service on All
Radios, T.V.'s and Hi-F's
All Work Guaranteed ,
STOFFLET'S RADIO AND TV SERVICE
207 E. Ann NO 8-811
X22
A- New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase PlanI
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
x14
ORGANS and PIANOS by WURLIT-
ZER, EVERETT, & THOMAS. Mak-
ers, restorers, and dealers of rare
violins and bows. Also GUITARS and
BRASS INSTRUMENTS.
Sales - Service - Rentals.- Lessons
MADDY MUSIC
209 E. Liberty. NO 3-3395
X40
PERSONAL
Youth-i-verse . . . or bust!t!
Kappa Delta-Delta Tau Delta
F90
PARADE ON CAMPUS'
3:45 P.M.
today
MICHIGRAS
P97
BACKWARD, turn backward
Oh Time in your flight,
Make me a child again
Just for tonight. F96
Try
Golf
It's
Fun
AEPi-Geddes Miniature Golf1
F98
"This is the Night" for
SHOW BIZ U.S.A.
P94
Watch for the white rabbits.
P93
ROCK TO the Acacia Band at 2 o'clock,
Float 25, Detroit and Kingly Street.
P92
There's a host of toys
For girls and boys .. .
TO
OUR
YOUTH
Carnival tonight at Yost Field House
(tomorrow, tool)
F100
JOHN: With bated breath and panting
heart I watt for our meeting tonight
at the A.E.Phi-Theta Xi booth.
Marsha n0
Dear Phi Sigma Sigma actives:
The hunting season is open now
You and your date may find It
somehow.
Nick Arboritum P38
PHI MU and Sigma Alpha Mu arbitrate
as cartoon characters strike at Michi-
gras 1960. P63
Watch for W U S

FP'
SIP 'N SING
with Gamma Phi Beta and Sigma Nu
at MICHIGRAS
F102
"STEAMBOAT NEW ORLEANS" will
stop at SHOW BIZ U.S.A. P95
DIRTY CARS OR BIKES-Delta Gam-
ma pledges will wash them Satur-
day, April 23, 9 A.M. to 1 P.M. at the
Delta Gamma House. Cars $1.00, bikes
65c. P101
IKE, BEN HOGAN, SAM SNEAD, BING
CROSBY will be there. A E Pi, Ged-
des MINIATURE GOLF. P77
NOTICE
It seems our Goose just wants to
stay on the loose . . . watch out
for it, we know you'll like it.
Tau Delta Phi
Delta Phi Epsilon
P53
OLYMPIA
S.G.C. Cinema Guild, April 21, 22
P41

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.84 4.14

Figure 5 average words to a tine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786

ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER ROOMS for men available
now. McDonnald House, 1108 Hill. See
Mr. Sharma between 5 & 8 P.m. E-19
6 MEN desire board starting April 18.
Contact NO 2-6422. E18
FOR RENT
FOR SUMMER: 5 room furnished apt.
close to campus. NO 3-3626. C15
SUMMER: Large, furnished three bed-
room apt, 1 block from campus. 728
S. State, . C16
FOR SUMMER: Furnished apt. for 2
to 4 men. Call NO 3-7541 ext. 805'
C17
GIRL WANTED to share modern apt.
near campus and hospital. Summer
and/or fall. Call NO 2-2521, ext. 6419
or 6515 after 6 P.M. C18
SUMMER: 3 room furnished apt, ex-
cellent location. Reasonable. NO 3-
7778. 013
BEAUTIFUL wood-paneled apt. Kitch-
en, immediate and summer. NO 3-
8267. L15
NEW LUXURIOUS air conditioned one
bedroom apt. available for summer or
longer. Reasonable rent. Call 5-6457.
C10
SUMMER: 3 rooms, bath, near campus
& S. University stores, quiet. Separate
entrance. NO 2-7711. C12
SUMMER: Brand new furnished apt. 2
bedrooms, G.E. kitchen, half block
from campus. NO 3-6690. 07
WANTED TO RENT: A furnished house
or apartment during the months of
July and August or from the middle
of July to the first of September.
Must have two or three bedrooms.
Three adults. Write Box 10, Michigan
Daily. C99
SUMMER: Modern penthouse for four
or five. Completely furnished, air-
conditioning, sun deck, kitchen fa-
cilities including dishes, cooking uten-
sils and dish washer. On campus. Call
NO 3-5135 evenings. C5
SUMMER SUBLET: new large furnished
2 bedroom apt. Call NO 5-7962 or NO
5-8205. Ci
FOR SALE OR LEASE. Large rooming
house, close to campus, approved for
26 men. Phone NO 2-6156. C14
410 OBSERVATORY near Stockwell,
new 2 bedroom apartments. Immedi-
ate. $135 per month. Call NO 2-7787
or evenings NO 3-2763. 085
839 TAPPAN near Bus. Ed. School. 2
bedroom furnished deluxe couple or
4 people. Call days NO 2-7787 or eve-
nings NO 2-4165. 084
ACTUALLY on campus, clean 5 rooms
furnished. NO 3-5947. C20
CAMPUS ROOMS for men, reasonable.
Linens furnished. NO 3-4747. C17
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS-Modern
apartment, 514 S. Forest. Also room.
NO 2-1443. C25
LARGE ROOM, single $8 per week. HU
2-4959, 5643,Geddes Road. C35
GIRL WANTED to share spacious apart-
ment close to campus next semester.
Call NO 5-7616 after 5 p.m. 067
DO YOU HAVE boarders moving out-
Rooms for rent? Apartments for rent?
Do you want a cheap, convenient,
widely read source to publish this in-
formation??????????? then -- try the
MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED
NO 2-4786
C42

FOR SALE
SIAMESE KITTENS: 2 males 6 m
old, 1 sealpoint and 1 bluepoint. Stu
service. NO 2-9020.,B
BIKE: Girl's bike for sale. 1 year ol
$20. NO 5-7272. B
FOR SALE-Red 1956 MGA. Call 1
3-3814, ask for Jack. - B
EVERGREENS at wholesale for Unive
sity personnel by University employe
Yews, junipers, arborvitae. Spreadin
globe, upright forms. Call Michael I
at NO 8-8574. B
BIKES and SCOOTERS
CUSHMAN HUSKY '53. Transmissio
lights, 422 Adams, W.Q.'NO 2-4401.
ZUNDAPP SCOOTER-'58 Vella. Sacr
fice for quick sale. $225. NO 2-537
1956 VESPA Scooter. Good conditioi
Best offer. Call Jim, NO 3-1444, Z
MISCELLANEOUS
AROUND SOUTH AMERICA, July 41
to August 5th. Panama, Quito, Limf
Cusco, Macchu Pichu, Santiago, Bue
nos Aires, Montevideo, Sao Paul(
Igaassu Falls, Rio de Janeiro, Brasilit
Caracas. Followed by optional tw
weeks In Guatemala, Mexico, or t:
Caribbean area. See all the sighte
meet leaders in all countries; lecture
and discussions. Leader: DR. HUBER
HERRING, author "Good Neighbors
"A History of Latin America," etc. Ad
dress him: 763 Indian Hill Boulevare
Claremont, California. A
JUNE GRADUATES -- Commencemer
Announcenent orders win be take
April 4-8 at S.A.B. 9:00 A.M.-5 P.M.
M
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIE
NEW ATLAS TIRES
"Gripsafe" in sets of 4; 4-670x15,
$58.75; 750x14, $74.95; (plus recap-
able tires and tax). Other sises
comparably low. Tune-ups. Brake
service.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATIOt
Cor. Main & Catherine NO 8-7717
S
C-TED STANDARD SERVICI
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires. batteries and accessor-
les. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service--mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it 1"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
B.
WHITE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
6
SMITH AUTO UPHOLSTERING
Auto and Furniture .
Refinished Reupholstered
Convertible Tops
NO 3-8644
YAHR'S MOTrjR SALES
Bumping and Painting
Used Cars Bought and Sold
NO 3-4510
Both at 507S. Ashley
NEW CARS
BEST DEAL

BIKE SALE
BIKING TO CLASS SAVES TIME

Quality Service
A Must

38 95
LIGHTWEIGHT
3 SPEEDS
LADIES

36 9
LIGHT WEIGHT
COASTER BRAKE
MEN'S

Read
Daily

LINCOLN
MERCURY
COMET
ENGLISH FORD
FITZGERALD
INC.

I

r

I

FOR BICYCLE BUFFS
The New 10 SPEED Schwinn Continental

Classifieds

BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords--$7.95; socks
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. Wl

3345 Washtenaw
Phone NO 3-4197

1 4 Y

I I

I

BUSINESS PERSONAL BUSINESS PERSONAL

I

t AN r __

SGC CINEMA GUILD

{1

.4

m M"
40

I

I

I

Offers a wonderful
new world of
color and action
to all 8mm
camera owners.
E.1.20

11

WHO UNIONIZED those comic strip
characters? They are on strike! You
can be sure it wasn't Sigma Alpha
Mu or Phi Mu. F64

Germany had been awarded the Eleventh
Olympiad before the Nazis took over. Hitler
determined that the Berlin games should not
only be the most spectacular in Olympic his-
tory, but that the Olympic tradition should serve
to disseminate the Nazi doctrine "Strength
Through Joy" to the world at large. .Miss
Riefenstahl, who had just completed the edit-
ing of TRIUMPH OF THE WILL, was given a

See it tonight!
Mother Goose on the Loose!
Tau Delta Phi - D Phi E

I

WNV

.. - 1

I

I

I

'I

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