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April 17, 1960 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-17

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9 x

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 17,1 1960

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 17. 1960

' +s

lnnesota Favored in Big Ten
9

FRESHMEN STAR:
Whites Maul Blues, 48-0, in Scrimmage

CHICAGO (P) -- Minnesota isv
seeking a third straight Big Ten
baseball title this year and if the
league's pitching prowess is all it
is cracked up to be, the other nine
teams are expected to put up a
merry chase.
Except for the champion Go-
phers, every team in the league
hopes to improve this season
through better pitching.
And if Minnesota has a weak-
ness, it could very well be in pitch-
ing. The Gophers lost Fred Bruck-
bauer and Dick Siebert Jr. through
graduation. This twosome ac-
counted for nine of Minnesota's
ten conference triumphs last year.
Play Begins
Conference play will begin-this
weekend with Illinois, Purdue,
Michigan and Michigan State get-
ting things started. Illinois will be
at Michigan Friday and at Michi-
gan State for a doubleheader Sat-
urday.
Purdue will be at Michigan State
Friday and at Michigan for two
games Saturday. The following
weekend will find all league mem-
bers in conference competition
with single games on Friday and
doubleheaders Saturday.
Despite possible pitching diffi-
culties, Minnesota again will be
the team to beat. Shortstop Dave
Pflepsen and Second Baseman
John Erickson are back and help
form the best infield in the league.
Deep in Catching
The Gophers are deep in catch-
ing. And back in the outfield is
Ron Causton who led the league
in batting last year with a .475
average.
Illinois and Wisconsin, who
finished in a second place tie in
1959, will be strong again. The,
Illini have a veteran pitching staff
headed by Terry Gellinger who
had a 9-0 record last year andf
was 5-0 in the Big Ten.
Russ Martin and John Jurase-
vich will provide outfield punch
and what problems Illinois might
have can crop up in the infield
where shortstop Bob Klaus no
longer will be operating.
Badgers Have Veterans
Wisconsin will field a veteran
team including pitchers Marty
Stillman, Jack ;Simon and Bill
Richards. This trio provided seven
of Wisconsin's nine conference
victories.
A big loss was catcher Ed Can-
ATajor League
Standings
N(ATIONAL LEAGUE

non but back again are outfield-
ers Dale Hackbart and Russ Muel-
ler who batted .310 and .300,
respectively, in league competition.
Indiana could easily improve on
its fourth place tie with Michigan
State. The Hoosiers have four
pitchers returning who turned in
all eight of Indiana's ten vic-
tories.
They are Paul Deem, Paul Mi-
chaels, Dick Persinger and Bob
Kyff. Don Foreman, an outfielder,
will carry the big stick. He batted
.339 last season.
Eight Lettermen
Purdue has eight retutrning let-
termen and five are pitchers, in-
cluding Jack Helkamp who was
2-0 in the Big Ten. Bernie Allen,
who batted .348, will be back at
shortstop.
Northwestern will field a veteran
team with starters at all but two
positions. Don Weaver batted .364
in the Big Ten and will be in the
outfield.
Michigan has high hopes after
a successful Arizona tour which
produced eight victories in 11
games. Denny McGinn and Al
Koch hurled two victories each
and very regular in the lineup
managed to hit ..300 or better.
MSU Deep on Mound
Michigan State has a deep
pitching staff headed by Mickey
Sinks and Don Sackett but the
Spartans will be weak in the out-
field and need hitting help.
Iowa should improve on its ninth
place finish. Eleven Hawkeye let-
termen include pitchers Dick Clau-
sen, Allan Klinger and Rog Ru-
deen.
Ohio State has 10 top veterans
back and the Buckeyes considered
their recent Southern tour a suc-
cess with five victories, two losses
and two ties. Top pitchers are
Tony Drobnick and Paul Seitz.
Bob Stearns and Bill German give
OSU a solid outfield.

By ROY RHAESA
The White team, composed of
veterans and a flock of promising
freshmen, crushed the Blues, 48-0,
yesterday, in the first scrimmage
of spring football practice.
A crowd of about 200 persons
watched the scrimmage through-
out its two hour length.
The most impressive players for
the White team were Bob Chand-
ler, a promising freshman quar-
terback from LaGrange, Ill., and
Dave Raimey, a frosh halfback
from Dayton, Ohio.
Both Score
The 185-lb. Raimey tallied twice
as he plunged through the line
both times from about five yards
out.
Chandler also figured in two

i
1
a

GOPHER STAR--Senior shortstop Dave Pflepsen forms part of
the Minnesota infield which is supposed to be tops in the Big
Ten. The Gophers are favored to win their third consecutive
Conference title this year. The season opens this weekend.

SPORT SHORTS:
Pistons Acquire Ferry; Ingo To Sign

T T 11
Jones Hurls,
One Hitter
By The Associated Press
Sam Jones, the toothpick-chew-
ing workhorse of the San Fran-
cisco Giants, came within four,
outs of another no-hitter and then;
settled for a one-hitter in a 6-1
victory over the Chicago Cubs
yesterday.
Big Sam, a 21-game winner for
the Giants a year ago, followed up
his opening day 3-hit job against
St. Louis with 7% hitless innings
against the Cubs. Then pinch-
hitter Walt Moryn, batting with
two out in the eighth, homered
for the only Cub hit-and run.
Red Schoendienst and Ed Bailey
also had big days as the Milwau-
kee Braves routed Philadelphia in
Gene Mauch's debut as Phillie
manager, 13-3. The Cincinnati
Redlegs thumped Pittsburgh 11-3.
Schoendienst, making a come-
back after a year under treat-
ment for tuberculosis, went 4-for-
4 with a triple, double and two
singles and drove in three runs
for the Braves. Lew Burdette
coasted to victory in his first 1960
start.
Bailey went 5-for-5 for the
Reds, including a double, as Cin-
cinnati made it easy for young
Jay Hook, who went the route on
a 7-hitter.
The Dodgers, with a chance to
tie the Giants 3-1 first place rec-
ord, met St. Louis in a night game
at Los Angeles, winding up the
Saturday program.
In American League exhibitions,
Richmond of the International
League beat Baltimore 6-2, Boston
whipped New York 4-1 at Yankee
Stadium, Detroit stopped Kansas
City 5-1 at West Palm Beach,
and Cleveland defeated the Chi-
cago White Sox 4-1 at Mobile,
Ala.
Iteachers1

scores, both resulting from long
passes. The first was a 35- d. toss
to end Bill Hornbeck, and the sec-
ond another 35-yd. throw with
halfback Dennis Fitzgerald on the
receiving end.
Other touchdowns scored by the
Whites, all on short runs, were by
Harry Newman, Paul Raeder, Ken'
Tureaud and Jack Strobel.
Many more touchdowns could
have been scored but Coach Bump
Elliott reversed the white teams
several times after they had pene-
trated to the Blues one yd. line.
Another freshman quarterback
also performed well during- the
drill. Dave Glinka, from Toledo,
Ohio, showed an accurate passing
arm as he pinpointed several re-
ceivers. In addition, he likes to
run with the ball if he sees an
opening. In two tries he picked up
thirty yards for the Whites.
Veterans Shine
The two veterans who showed
up the best were quarterback John
Stamos and fullback Ken Tureaud.
Stamos, though shaky at first, soon
started finding his targets and
was able to move his white team
well.
Tureaud showed grinding power
as he drove for yardage, although
Blues were hanging all over him.
Elliott said that first week of
'M' Baseball
Michigan's doubleheader with
Eastern Michigan yesterday was
postponed because of wet
grounds. The games have not
yet been rescheduled.

drills have proceeded about'as ex;
pected. "We're just trying to get
our basic offense set up and evalu-
ate our men."
Offense the Same
That basic offense is the same
one that was used last season. It's
the winged T with the ends in
tight. "Later in practice we'll start
opening up our offense more un-
til we approach the one that we'll
use during the Big Ten season,"
said Elliott.
Elliott added that the scrim-
mage, which was designed to im-
prove offensive timing, showed the
usual early season mistakes.

CHICAGO (A') - Jerry Lucas of
Ohio State today was named the.
Big Ten's most valuable basketball
player.
Lucas, who helped lead the
Buckeyes to the conference title
and the NCAA championship; is
the second Ohio State player to
receive the award put out by the
Chicago Tribune.
Robin Freeman won it in 1956.
Lucas was chosen from a list of
10- players. Each team named its
most valuable player and then a
23-man panel including veteran
officials, coaches, Big Ten Com-
missioner Tug Wilson and Tribune
Sports Editor, Wilfried Smith
voted.

Ohio. He played in 27 games dur-
ing the regular season and scored
710. points. He also picked up 442
rebounds on defense.
Terry Dischinger of Purdue was
second. Others in the' running
were Governor Vaughn. of Illinois,
Whalt Bellamy, Indiana; Don Nel-
son, Iowa; Lovell Farris; Michi-
gan; ' Horace Walker, Michigan
State; Ron Johnson, Minnesota;
Willie Jones, Northwestern, and
Fred Clow, Wisconsin.
Two weeks ago Lucas received
another coveted award -when he
was named to the United States
Olympic Team. He was one of
seven collegians named to the 12
man squad that will compete in

Lucas, 20, is from Middletown, I Rome.

When asked about his defense
Elliott replied, "we haven't even
started to work on it yet." This
phase will be undertaken later in
spring practice.
Although it was only the first
real drill of the spring the play-
ers were hitting very hard, and
in spite of the fierce contact there
were no serious Injuries.
Elliott said that "some of the
quarterbacks are looking real
good." As to specific players he
pointed out the work of Raimey as
very good. "But it's really too
early to tell how anyone is going
to do," he concluded.

U! i

If

'll

'I

By The Associated Press
DETROIT -- In a move to bol-
ster their front line, the -Detroit
Pistons yesterday acquired forward
Bob Ferry from the St. Louis
Hawks in a straight player deal
for veteran Ed Conlin.
Ferry, who stands 6'8" and
weighs 230, was the only rookie
to crack the star-studded St. Louis
lineup during the past National
Basketball Assn. season. He scored
364 points in 62 games for the
Hawks.
Johannson on Way
PRAGINS, Switzerland - World
heavyweight champion Ingemar
Johannson said yesterday he is
flying to New York next Monday
to sign the contract for his June
22 return fight against Floyd Pat-
terson.
Johannson has been training in
Switzerland since April 5 when he
piloted his own four four-seater
plane into Geneva from his home-
town, Goteborg, Sweden.

Ohio State's Lucas Chosen..
Most Valuable in Big Ten

W
San Francisco 3
Cincinnati .... 2
X-Los Angeles 2
Milwaukee .... 2
Chicago......2
Pittsburgh .... 1
Philadelphia .. 1
X-St. Louis ... 4

L
1
I
1
t
2
3

Pct.
.750
.667
.667
.667
.300
.333
.333
.00

GB
14
I14
1%
24

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
X-St. Louis at Los Angeles
(incomplete)
Milwaukee 13, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 11, Pittsburgh 3
San Francisco 6, Chicago 1

Jones Stars in Relays
QUANTICO, Va. - Hayes Jones,
the Eastern Michigan flash, turn-
ed in the fastest 110-meter high
hurdles of the year - :13.6 - and
Ed Moran breezed to a 4:04.6 mile
victory yesterday in the Quantico
Relays.
This was Jones' first outdoor
effort this spring.nHis clocking was
eight-tenths of a second under the
qualifying time for the Olympics.
Moran, who had a disappoint-
ing winter indoors, turned in a
solid performance. He had hoped
to get down to the Olympic qual-
ifying time of 4:02.
The Michigan State two-mile
relay team not only set a meet
standard but the 7:33.2 clocking
was the fastest of the year. Jim
Carr, Brian Castle, Bob Lake and
Willie Atterberry carried the baton
for the Spartans.
Dave Sime, the world record
holder in the 200 meters and 220-
yard dash, pulled a muscle and
had to scratch from the final of
the 100 meters. The pull isn't be-
lieved to be serious.
Speedway Entries Close
INDIANAPOLIS - Three form-
er winners were among drivers
nominated when entry lists for the
Memorial Day 500-mile auto race
closed Friday midnight.
Fifty-two cars, 10 of them with-
out drivers, had been entered and
Indianapolis Motor Speedway of-
ficials said they understood eight
or 10 more entries were mailed
ahead of the deadline.
The field will be cut to 33 start-
ers in time trials, May 14, 15, 21
and 22.
Rodger Ward of Indianapolis,
the 1959 Indianapolis winner who
became the first race driver to
earn over $150,000 in one season,

was among the entries. Former
Memorial Day winners Jimmy
Bryan, Phoenix, Ariz., and Troy
Ruttman, La Mirada, Calif., also
were nominated.
Nieder Outputs Davis
SANTA BARBARA, Calif.-
Handsome Bill Nieder outshone
Dave Davis with a best mark of 63
feet 1D4inches in their heralded
head - to - head shotputting duel
here yesterday.
But neither could break the
existing world record or even ap-
proach his own best marks.
The two giants performed in the
feature attraction of the 22nd an-
nual Santa Barbara Easter Relays.
* * *
Kingpetch Takes Title
BANGKOK, Thailand - Pone
Kingpetch, 22-year-old son of a
poor Thailand fisherman, yester-
day won the world's flyweight box-
in g championship by a split de-
cision from defender Pascual Perez
of Argentina in a bloody, 15-round
bout.
Sailing Club
Wins Title
The Michigan Sailing Club yes-
terday won the Big Ten Sailing
championship at Base Line Lake
by scoring 76 points to easily out-
distance their six other foes.
Michigan State grabbed second
place with 57 points, followed by
Wisconsin with 54 points. Ohio
State and Northwestern tied for
fourth with 53 points.
It was the second Michigan vic-
tory in the three meets they have
competed in thus far. Earlier they
won the Annapolis Regatta.

ToAK T ThkkfrTrosEIf E
(TAKE A CRACK AT THESE QUESTIONS AND SEE IF YOU CONNECT*)

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
Announces
Lecture No. 6 in series, "WHAT'S WORTH LIVING FOR?
Some Guidelines for the Perplexed of the 60's"
Wed., Apr. 20 at 8 P.M. in Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
George E. Mendenhall, Prof., Near Eastern Studies
"The Biblical Hierarchy of Values"

L

$

students
HAVE FUN

I

MAKE GOOD MONEY

this summer
Work for

$

SUMMER PLACEMENT

Attention State of Michigan Residents free to work full
time all summer. Earn $125 per week plus scholarship
opportunity. Experience not required. Car necessary.
Applicants will be interviewed at the UNION, Room
3G promptly at 2:00 P.M. and at 4:00 P.M., Thursday,
April 21, 1960.

Workman's
in CHICAGO
0 INTERESTING

" GOOD PAYING
* TEMPORARY
$ OFFICE JOBS
Experience Necessary

$

RESERVE YOUR JOB NOW
Write for application
Workman
Diversified Enterprises, Inc.
320 N. Dearborn, Chicago 10
$4833 Irving Park Rd.,
Chicago 41
5935 S. Pulaski, Chicago 29

The senior officers of
the Michigan Union announce
EXTENSION of petitioning for
general male co-chairman of
1960 Homecoming.
1. Pick up information in Union student offices -
2nd floor - North Wing - from 2-5 P.M. WEEK-
DAYS.

11 .

If you were offered a high-paying summer i
an animal trainer, would you (A) insist on s
animals? (B) ask for pay in advance? (C) find
why professionals won't take the job?

4k.1
V

2, Petition due: Thursday, April 21
. Interviews: Sunday, April 24

Syracuse University
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
ABROAD

"Time heals all wounds"
v is a statement (A) de-
nounced by antiseptic
manufacturers; (B) as
true as "Time wounds all
heels"; (C) that means
your mind can build its
own scar tissue.
AOQ Bf C
In traffic, when a driver
behind you blows his
horn, do you (A) go and
' sock him? (B) wonder
what's wrong? (C) hope
it'll settle his nerves?
An B c
When a pal bends your
ear about why his filter
cigarette is best, do you
listen most to (A) his
chatter about how good
it tastes-regardless of
/I how it filters? (B) his re-
mark that the filter must
be good because it's new?
(C) his comments that
both really good filtration
and real tobacco taste are
important?
,,-~ --, f-1,-,

s
C
8
S
S
r
e
r
r
x,
d
f
t
7
n
e
A

b as
mall
out AOBLM Cl
women who think for themselves have
studied the facts about filters and have
chosen Viceroy ... the one cigarette
with a thinking man's filter and a smok-
ing man's taste.
*lf you checked (B) in three out of four of
these questions, you don't exactly flunk-but
if you checked (C), you think for yourselfI
.
KIN IZ?
'Jhc 17}...'..'i-r:',?*k n : ,' .::....m.:..:.

Men who face wind and weather

FULL SEMESTE
ABRO)

RSI
ADj
for
ates
LY!

SUMMER
ABROAD 1960*
for graduates
or undergraduates

choose the protection of...
AFTER SHAVE

under gradua

FRANCE
(Coen) French,6 credits

ITAI

I

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