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April 16, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

is A MYTIM" A W invvir v j% , inner..

TWO HE MCHIAN D ILY l a,.lffln e__

SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1960

0

arx Expert
fo Discuss
Revolutions
"The Russian Revolution and
he Revolution of Our Times," is
subject of a speech to be given1
>y Prof. Alfred G. Meyer, of Mich-
gan State University, in the
nulti-purpose room of the Under-
graduate Library at 8:15 p.m.
Tuesday.
The Democratic Socialist Club
s sponsoring.
Prof. Meyer, who is affiliated
with the 14SU political science de-
partment is recognized as one of
the foremost authorities on the
subject of Marxist political move-
nents throughout the world.
He is the author of "Marxism-
[he Unity of Theory and Practice"
and "Leninism."

Call Parley
To Discuss
Sit-in Strikes

'Ensian Appointments

Movement
To Confer

Leaders
on Goals

BETSY UNDERWOOD STEVE AUGUSTYN
... accounts manager ... finance manager

JUDY DONER
.. . personnel director

S. Hurok Presents

RICHARD
the 20th Century Troubodor
Auspices: Old West End
Folk Music Society
in association with
Daniel Gordon
FRI., APRIL 22,8:30 P.M.
at
Former Esquire Theatre
209 Superior St.
Toledo, Ohio
(now Toledo Youth Center)
Tickets: $4.00, $3.00, $2.00
Available at
HINES WORLD OF SOUND
641 Madison Ave.
GRINNEL BROS.
411 Jefferson
REESE RECORD SHOP
Westgate Shopping
KAUFFMANN MUSIC STORE
2063 W. Central
SELIGMAN BROS.
1234 Sylvania'

TOM KABAKER KEN McELDOWNEY
... magazine editor ... associate city editor

KATHY MOORE
. . .associate editorial director

Invitations have been issued re-
cently to some 1500 student lead-
ers in the United States to attend
a National Student Conference on
the "sit-in" movement.
The conference will be held in
Washington on April 22-23. John.
Feldkamp, Student Government
Council President, will represent
the University.
Sponsored by the United States
National Student Association, the
conference is designed to bring
together student leaders from all
over the country.
Present Goals
According to Donald A. Hoff-
man, USNSA President, and Cur-
tis B. Gans, National Affairs Vice-
President, the purpose of the
conference is to present partici-
pants with a coherent picture of
the nature and goals of the South-
ern movement and to discuss the
responsibilities of all students with
regard to this movement.
Gans said they hope to create
a national awareness that a num-
ber of students are concerned
with the situation in the South.
Hoffman commented that the
"sit-in" movement is the most
important development in race
relations in recent years, and that
it is significant that the protest
has come primarily from college
students.
Student Requests
"The conference has been or-
ganized," he said, "because of re-
quests from student body presi-
dents throughout the country for
information concerning the move-
ment."
Since demonstrations began in
the South at the first of the year,
many sympathy actions have
taken place in other parts of the
country. Fund-raising drives, en-
couragement to the Southern stu-
dents, and official protests have
characterized the concern.
"In all areas of the country,"
Hoffman said, "the American stu-
dent is vitally concerned with the
human rights picture in the
South. We feel there is a great
need for co-ordinated discussion
of the "sit-in" movement so that
all opinions may be heard and
students can gain a total picture
of what is happening in the South
and what is happening outside
the South in support of the move-
ment."
Meetings Open
Meetings will be held on an
open basis, including presentation
of pro and con viewpoints. Par-
ticipants will be able to receive'
first-hand information on the sit-
uation from the Southern students
themselves.
Delegates to the convention will
be provided with scholarships'
covering room expenses and par-1
tial travel subsidies.

-Daly-Larry vanic.
NEW EDITORIAL STAFF--Chuck Moore (left) has been appointed 'Ensian engravings editor. Dotty
Morrall (center) is copy editor, and Art Neuman (right) is new personnel director.

Board in Control Names'
DailyEditors, Managers
(Continued from Page 1)

Champe, '60BAd, as finance man-
ager, Augustyn also comes from
Detroit. He is an accounting ma-
jor and an Evans Scholar.
Miss Underwood will follow
Marilyn Fisher, '60, as Daily ac-
counts manager. She is a resident
of Ann Arbor majoring in French

DIAL
NO 2-6264

and is president of Phi Mu soror-
ity.
McEldowny, a political science
major, will replace Peter Dawson,
'60, as associate city editor. He is
a 20-year-old resident of Battle
Creek.
Succeeding Barton Huthwaite,
'60, as associate editorial director,
Miss Moore is from Flint. She is
a 20-year-old junior concentrat-
ing in English.
The senior appointments for the
summer edition of The Daily were
also announced by the Boa-rd last
night. Miss Moore will be summer
editor and Charles Judge, '62BAd,
will be business manager for the
summer.
Judge is a resident of Ames,
Iowa, and a member of Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity. His ac-
tivities have included membership
on the central committees for
Homecoming and Michigras.
Board Names
Senior Staffs
For 'Ensiai1
(Continued from Page 1)
we have many ideas. "We hope to
continue the fine line of year-
books Michigan is noted for."
Martin, 20 years old, is a sopho-
more economics major.
Newman, a 20 year old history
major concentrating in pre-legal
studies, comes from Washington,
Pa.
Miss Morrall, a sophomore,
majoring in psychology, is 19 years
old, comes from Youngstown, 0.
Moore succeeds Carol Hand-
schumacher '60 Ed. A sophomore
from Dundee, Mich., he is 20 years
old.
THE
PROMETH EAN
*
OPEN DAILY
at 2 P.M.
Entertainment Nightly

PAINTING:
'U' Exhibits
Modern Art,
Twenty-six contemporary paint-
ings from the Guggenheim Mu-
seum and other collections have
been selected for the exhibition,
"Images at Mid-Century," now on
display at the University Museum
of Art in Alumni Memorial Hall.
James Johnson Sweeney, direc-
tor of the Solomon R. Guggenheim
Museum, New York, who selected
the contemporary paintings ob-
served: "If we hope to understand
what a painter, a poet or any
other artist is trying to do, we
must see his efforts as a means
of communication--a language."
Painter's Language
"The painter's language, like
the poet's must be constantly re-
freshed. Whether the artist cre-
ates his painting out of elements
or forms that have readily or less
readily recognizable associations
has no necessary bearing on the
intrinsic quality of his work.
"The only thing that counts is
whether the artist, for his expres-
sion, has created a "New Noun."
Lectures in Conjunction
The exhibition, which will con-
tinue through June 12, is being
presented along with a lecture
series under the auspices of the
architecture college and the Mu-
seum of Art.
Two lectures, one by Sam Hun-
ter, chief curator of the Min-
neapolis Institute of Arts and
the other by Dore Ashton, asso-
ciate art critic of the New York
Times will be given on April 20
and 27 respectively at 4 p.m. in
the Architecture Auditorium.
Ceramics Shown
Another exhibition currently at
the Museum is one containing cer-
amics by 11 potters-an interna-
tional group representing Japan,
Italy, England, the Scandinavian
countries and the United States.
Most of the articles in this ex-'
hibition, "Clay Forms," are for
sale. Items in the display were
selected by John Stephenson and
Paul Suttmen, both of the ar-
chitecture college.
A lecture by Bernard Leach,
English ceramist, will be presented
in conjunction with the exhibit at
7 p.m. May 3 in the Architecture
Auditorium.

-Daly-Larry Vanic.
NEW BUSINESS STAFF--Edward Lublin (left) is Advertising Manager of the 1961 'Ensian, Sue
Philippart (center) is Accounts Manager, and Roger Burt (right) has been appointed Sales Manager.
ECONOMICS, ART
Honors Prorm xrpands Courses

I I

The most important develop-
ment in the Honors Program at
the University is the institution
of two new courses in the College
Honors program.
The first of these will be College
Honors 198, which was formerly
Economics 198, General Systems
Theory. This course, which will be
taught by Prof. Kenneth E. Bould-
ing, will be open to seniors in the

honors group in all fields of con-
centration and will be an inter-
disciplinary survey of various phy-
sical, biological and social sys-
tems.
The second new course, to be
taught by Prof. Marvin Felheim,
will be College Honors 91, This
course will be Romanticism in
American Arts and will deal with
the fields of literature, music, art,
and the visual arts.
The program will also continue
its present courses.
A sign of the progress of the
honors program from its beginning
two years ago is that next year,
for the first time, seniors will take

honors degree in all departments
of the University.
The high quality of the honors
group and greater competition for
admission to the University will
enable the Honors Council to
raise its standards for admission
of incoming freshmen. Prof. An-
gell commented that "it is very'
evident that we are getting more
good students here."
The minimum college board
score standard for the honors
group has been raised from a 630
average two years ago to a 670
average for next year. Prof. An-
gell said that "a large percentage
of the group which was originally
selected would not now be invited
into the Honors group."

Maize, Blue Pranksters Shake
Campus for Frosh Weekend
4/-.

- I
E LATE SHOW TONIGHT

~c sop "
,( ETRO .Old OP
9t

" 1 P.M

J

I

I Last Chance

Lost Chance

GOOD SEATS FOR MATINEE TODAY
Evening Sold Out
"THE OLD LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
REAALY BEGAN TO ROCK!" (Mich. Daily)
"ALL THE ACTORS WERE GOOD-SOME
TRULY GREAT" (Mich. Daily)
"Irene Connors as Ruth . . . acted and mimed her
way through the role with a delightfulness that would
be enough to make the Civic Theatre ignore Rosalined
Russell"- (A.A. News)
"JOEL BOYDEN ... A MAN MOUNTAIN OF FUN!"
(Mich. Daily)
"David Newman, Ted Heusel . . . Bette Ellis . . . Jim
Bob Stephensor. .. were memorable." (A.A. News)
"CHOREOGRAPHY ... REMARKABLE !"
(A.A. News)
"Miss Hauman (Eileen) filled the theatre with her
sparkling personality." (Mich. Daily)
"MUSIC (Bernstein's) . . . AND LYRICS . . . FINE
BLEND OF APPROPRIATENESS AND SAVORY MEL-
ODY." (A.A. News)
MUSICAL COMEDY HIT
unAIInenFI

By LYNNE FRIEDMAN
"Beware of Little Blue Boo!"
cautioned Debra Horwitz, '63, pub-
licity chairman for the Blue Team
of Frosh Weekend.
"He's been especially mischiev-
ous this week," she added.
He turned the residence halls'
desserts into blueberry cobbler,
left his footsteps on trees on the
diag, and has even caused the
bells in Burton Tower to ring dif-
ferently, she said.
Seen On Campus
Little Blue Boo has also been
seen all over campus on the backs
of unsuspecting students.
African Union
To Celebrate
Freedom Day
The African Students' Union is
sponsoring an annual banquet to
celebrate Africa Freedom Day, at
the Father Richard Center April
23.
Sudanese food will be served,
and the celebration will feature
African art and music.
The guest speaker will be Mr.
Eduardo C. Moundalane, a re-
search officer with the United'
Nations. He will discuss "Develop-
ment of a New African Personal-
ity in African and World Affairs."
Tickets may be obtained from
the Michigan Union or the African
students.

The Maize Team, as well as the
Blue, presented skits on the diag
this week. The Maize Team, whose
theme pertains to the Deep South,
presented a skit honoring Maisey
Bell, the epitome of Southern
womanhood. The Maize Publicity
committee also scattered daisies
on the diag.
Adding new holidays to the
month of April, the Maize Team
has declared all Wednesdays
"Maize Days." And to daze the
campus, members of the Maize
team will be wearing yellow bows
with long streamers in their hair.
Rumors Of Spring
The rumor around campus is
that the recent balmy Southern-
like days have been by courtesy
of the Maize team.'
As "Beware of Little Blue Boo"
was this week's indication of the
Blue team's theme, the message
from Maize cooed, "We cotton to
y'all!"
New members were added to
both the Maize and the Blue
teams this week. The names of
all freshmen women who were not
already participating in Frosh
Weekend were distributed arbi-
trarily among both teams, and
these women will be contacted by
the finance committees.
All freshmen are requested to
pay their 50 cents class dues.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

DOORS
OPEN AT
12:45

It +

I.ame *O.. -n -A - , - .
Ca
starring
Also BUGS SUNNY Cartoon From WARNER BRO$.

DIAL
NO 5-6290

I

I

I

I

S.G.C.
Cinema qiI4
TONIGHT and Sunday
at 7:00 and 9:00
"DREAMBOAT"

A
NIRENE
(R1
E
S

BilWED., MAY 4
ANN ARBOR HIGH

TWO SHOWS

7 and 9:30 P.M.

Continuous
Today
From 1 P.M.

d ' +.

DIAL
NO 8-6416+

TICKETS

I Xkah$4.40, $3.30, $2.75,

_. ir. r rirwn..

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