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March 22, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TU

VCAA To Review
nfrew Labels Coaches'
'quests Discriminatory A

Hockey Elig
Gomberg Doi
At I-M Indoo

By MIKE GIULMAN
"It's going to ruin college hockey
i. it passes in the NCAA Rules
Committee."
This is the reaction of Michigan
hockey coach Al Renfrew to the
materialization of the long-threat-
ened imposition of a restriction
on Canadian players in American
college hockey.
Over the weekend the annual
meeting of the American College
Hockey Coaches Association in
Boston turned in a recommenda-
tion to the NCAA that all players
competing in a league with salary
limits be prohibited from Ameri-
can collegiate competition.
Effects Canadian Players
While the proposed ruling did
not mention Canadian players ex-
pressly, it would effect mainly
those who had competed in the
Ontario Hockey Association junior
'A' league.
This proposal will now go to the
NCAA hockey rules committee for
a final ruling.
In other action, the coaches
recommended that in the future,
the semifinal pairing be East vs.
East and West vs. West, so that
an East-West final can be assured.
It had been speculated by east-
ern sportswriters that the proposed
ban was aimed at the NCAA cham-
"pion, Denver, and the large um-
ber of players on Denver's squad
from the Regina Pats in the west-
ern junior league.
even 'M' Players
If this were so, it would also
effect the eligibility of seven form-
er Pats that Renfrew expects to
use next season.
Renfrew, while recognizing that
the rules that come out of the
NCAA rules committee can differ
greatly from the recommendation
that went in, does not think that
the proposal as stated would effect
these players.
"The way it was worded," said
Renfrew, "it read 'salaried league'
and the western league is not a
salaried league. To the best of my
knowledge, the OHA junior 'A'
league is the only one that could
even be considered one."
Pros Move In
"You can bet that the pros
would make the western junior
league a salaried one if it does
pass," said Renfrew pointing out
that this would keep the players
out of colleges and encourage pro-
fessional play.
Renfrew has long expressed his
opposition to the proposal that had
been in the air since early Janu-
ary when Minnesota's coach John
Mariucci announced his intentions
of putting forward such a bill.
The final vote on the Mariucci-
sponsored bill was 19-5, with Ren-
frew and the coaches of North Da-
kota, Michigan Tech, Denver and
Rennesaler Polytechnic Institute
on the short end of the stick.
Three Objections
The discouraged Wolverine
coach has three basic objections
to the impending legislation.
First, that it would be discrimi-
Rule Action
Postponed
y NCAA

natory against the Canadian ath-
lete, second, it is providing bad
publicity for the sport in this
country, and third, that this will
provide a means by which the pro-
fessional hockey leagues could-
prevent Canadian players from
getting an education by keeping
them in the professional system.
"This is playing right into the
professionals' hands," says Ren-
frew. "All they will have to do is 4
to see to it that salary stipulations
are put into all the leagues in
Canada (not just the Ontario Jun-
ior 'A' league). They could havez
expense regulations put into the
western junior league and nake
players there ineligible in this
country, too."
"They could even give the play-
ers in the Pee Wee leagues a dol-
lar or two expense money and
make a professional out of them,"
he went on.
"This could in effect keep any
kid that ever played hockey in
Canada from going to school in
this country and getting an edu-
cation!"
"It's too bad, too, because the LEAPS
fans here have seen some damn high in
good hockey in the past. I guess teamm
we'll just have to wait and see backgr
what happens." Califor
HIT 84.2% IN FIRST HALF:

IN VAIN-Ohio State g
n the air to take the ball 1
ate Joe Roberts in the
-ound stands Jerry Lucas
nia 75-55.

Shooting Sparks OSU to

By TOM WITECKI

I

"They beat California the same
way they beat us, by shooting
fantastically at the beginning of
the game."
The speaker was Michigan bas-
ketball coach Bill Perigo and the
team he was describing was Ohio
State's youthful, but brilliant
cagers, who surprised experts ev-
AANWLAlters
Bowl Choices
S A N FRANCISCO, WP)-T h e
Athletic Assn. of Western Univer-
sities (Big Five) decided yester-
day to select a New Year's Day
Rose Bowl opponent from among
the top teams of the 1960 football
season.
The "at large" selection was
made necessary after the Big Ten
withdrew from the Pasadena,
Calif., classic, granddaddy of all
football bowl games.

erywhere with a 75-55 thumping
of California, to win the NCAA
title.
Against Michigan the hot-
handed Buckeyes opened the con-
test by making 14 of their first
16 field goal attempts. In the 'big'
one at San Francisco Saturday,
Floyd Taylor's sharpshooters were
even more spectacular, hitting on
16 of their first 17 shots.
The Californians, rated as the
best defensive team in the na-
tion. didn't have a chance after
Ohio State's initial onslaught and
trailed at the half 37-19.
Perigo, who watched the con-
test on TV, said, "I think an im-
portant maneuver by Ohio State
was pulling Jerry Lucas out from:
under the boards and placing him
at the high post. This drew out:
California's defensive ace 6'10"
Darrel Imhoff, and enabled Buck-
eye forwards, John Havlick and
Joe Roberts, to dominate the re-
bounding.
"But of course the key factor
was their fantastic shooting,"

a:F
1aJC
uard Larry Siegfried (21) leaps
but it is already in the hands of
NCAA basketball finals. In the
(11). The Buckeyes defeated
NC AA Tistle
added Perigo. Statistics bear this
out. In the first half the Buckeyes
hit on 84.2% of their shots; three
of the players, Joe Roberts, Larry
Siegfried and Mel Nowell, didn't
miss a single shot in the first half.
The overall Ohio State shooting
percentage was an amazing 67.4%0
with all five starters in double fig-
ures. Lucas had 16, Nowell 15.
Sigrid13, Havlicek 12 and
And the most amazing part of
the Ohio State story is that three
of t tarters, NowellLu a a
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Gomberg amassed 25% points,
including two firsts, as it went on
to capture the Residence Hall in-
door track title last night at Yost
Field House.
The outstanding performer for
the meet, however, was Wally Knox
of Hinsdale as he set a new I-M
record in the high hurdles of :09.1
seconds, surpassing the old record
of :09.4 seconds held by J. Kwasny
of Allen Rumsey. Knox also won
the high jump with a leap of 5'6".
Jack Kelly of Prescott was also
a double-winner, taking the pole
Going to Fbr
for Sprinc

ibility
ninates Field
r Track Meet
vault with a jump of 10'8" and the
broad jump with a mark of 18'-
101/".
The final standings: Gomberg
25%, Hinsdale 19, Huber 17%,
Kelsey 15 , Prescott 10, Anderson
and Chicago 9, Allan Rumsey 8 ,
Adams 7, and Scott 5.
Other event winners were: Mile-
Ken Heller, Anderson, 5:08.8; 60-
yard dash-Les Richey, Chicago,
:07.0; 440-Dick Lange, Gomberg,
:59.0; 880-Gary Jochim, Gom-
berg, 2:15.5; Shot Put-Nick Kris-
da, Huber, 40'1".
rida
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RAMO WOOL DRDGE
invites
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in ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
PHYSICS
MATHEMATICS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
to discuss with members of our fielnical Staff
professional research and development oppory
tunities in the following general fields:
MISSILE ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS
ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS
INFORMATION PROCESSING SYSTEMS
DIGITAL COMPUTERS AND CONTROL SYSTEMS
ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION AND TEST EQUIPMENT
BASIC ELECTRONIC RESEARCH
ELECTRONIC RECONNAISSANCE AND COUNTERMEASURES
MICROWAVE TECHNIQUES
OPICS AND INFRARED
AIR NAVIGATION AND TRAFFIC CONTROL,
ANTISUBMARINE WARFARE.
ELECTRONIC LANGUAGE TRANSLATIO~
NUCLEAR ENERGY APPLICATIONS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS '
BASIC AND APPLIED PHYSICAL RESEARCH
Appointments for interviews Friday,
March 25, can be arranged through the
Student Placement Center.
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I

BOSTON, (P)--The NCAA Hock-
ey Rules Committee yesterday de-
ferred action on a recommenda-
tion that Canadians who have
been paid for playing amateur
hockey north of the border be
banned from U.S. collegiate com-
petition.
Rules committee chairman Herb
Gallagher last night said the com-
mittee will take action "when we
receive the recommendation, in
writing, from the ACHCA's secre-
tary, Dartmouth hockey coach
Eddie Jeremiah."
There was no indication when
the committee may receive the
report.
Exhibition Baseball
Milwaukee 6, Los Angeles 4
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago (A) 5
Kansas City 10, New York 1
st. Louis 12, Cincinnati 8
NHL Statistics
FINAL STANDINGS
W L T Pts.
Montrea1 40 18 13 92
Toronto 35 26 9 79
Chicago 28 29 13 69
Detroit 26 29 15 67
Boston 28 34 8 64
New York 17 38 15 49
FINAL LEADING SCORERS
GP G A Pts.
Bobby Hull, Chicago 70 39 42 81
Bronco Horvath, Bost. 68 39 41 80
Jean Beliveau, Mont. 60 34 40 74
Andy Bathgate, N.Y. 70 26 48 74
Gordy Howe, Detroit 70 28 45 73
Henri Richard, Mont. 70 30 43 73
Bernie Geoffron. Mont. 59 30 41 71

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