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March 20, 1960 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-20
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ t-,.

- _ ;

Lincoln Arts Center

(continued from Preceding Page)
According to the older theories,'
used in building La Scala and the
Philadelphia Academy of Music,
it is best to put up the walls and'
let theunfinished building stand
without a roof for about a year to
weather. Then the Vuiding will
be acoustically sound.
Obviously there will be no time
to weather the new auditorium,
and the architects will rely on sci-
ence to produce an auditorium
with acceptable acoustics.
Since the New York Philhar-
monic has been waiting to get out
of Carnegie Hall for over 25 years,
it would be disasterous if their
new home should turn out to be
a dud. One need only remember
the opening of Ford Auditorium
when it was discovered that the
acoustics were bad. Detroit fiaxed
its auditorium with a band shell
to make the building acoustically
passable. But they were lucky.
What would happen if the Phil-
harmonic were to move in to an
acoustic dud and discover that it
couldn't be fixed. Carnegie Hall
will have been torn down by then,
and the orchestra can't use Hunt-
er College indefinitely.
SHOULD something, almost any-
thing, go wrong with the hall,
the orchestra's contribution to the
center would be limited, if not
cancelled out altogether. No mat-
ter how fine the technicians and
architects are, acoustics are un-
predictable at best.
This same problem applies to all
the new buildings. The Metro-
politan Opera, in contrast to the
Philharmonica, however, is not
strapped for a place in which to
perform. The Met owns its build-
ing and will not do anything until
it has moved into its new home
and been assured that it will be
satisfactory. This house has been
planned for a long, long time.
Rockefeller originally bought the
site of the Rockefeller Center with
the thought of donating it to the
Met for its new home. That was
over thirty years ago and Mr.
Rockefeller didn't choose to wait.
The new "Met" is to be "modern
rococo" in design, whatever that
is. The first plans were beautiful,
but with each succeeding set of
Kerouac 's
New lif rook
Of Poetry
(Continued from Page 2)
I suspect Kerouac is still drun
with words. Donald Hall say
that's a nice way for young poet
to be. But the time comes whe
you grow up and learn to us
words to express ideas as best yo
can. The professional writer i
supposed to be capable of doing
this best. Kerouac is a professiona
writer.
NORMAN Mailer recently wrot
of Kerouac:
"He is as pretentious as a ric
whore, as sentimental as a lolly
pop. Yet I think he has a larg
talent. His literary energy is enor
mous, and he had enough ofa
wild eye to go along with hi
instincts and so became the firs
figure for a new generation. A
his best, his love of language ha
an ecstatic flux. To judge hi
worth it is better to forget abou
him as a novelist and see hit
instead as an action painter or
bard."
Methinks Mailer's right. Kee
in mind that the man is not tryin
to write the great American any
thing but is playing the thespia
amusing himself mostly while try
ing to make a living at it-an
you might come to see the poem

of Mexico City Blues as bein
not-so-bad-after-all.-
One last admonition: Read th
work aloud before passing judg
ment.

1

designs, the builders have been
trying to cut down on expenses
with the result that the new house
may end up a wee bit on the
chintzy side.
If the "Met" is thinking of cut-
ting off its nose to spite its face,
it's going about it in a very proper
fashion. As they will be stuck with
the new house for at least another
hundred years, they seem penny
wise and pound foolish to scrimp
on anything so lavish by tradi-
tion and definition as an opera
house.
T HE NEW opera house is being
planned to hold about four
thousand patrons, approximately
four hundred more than the pres-
ent building. This has caused a
problem peculiar to opera houses.
Either the house must be build
on the traditional horse-shoe pat-
tern, which offers the possibility
for superb acoustics, but faculty
sight lines, or it must be con-

structed along the lines of a movie
house, deep and high.a
A horrible example of the lat-
ter type is the Chicago Civic Opera
House. It is wide, high and above
all, deep.
The result is that anyone who
is not sitting in the first section
of the main floor is too far away
from the stage. Even in the first
row of the first balcony, or from
the boxes one tier below, it is im-
possible to make out what a per-
son on the stage looks like.
T HE MET plans to use the horse-
shoe design, sight lines and all.
This means a large minority of
the patrons will not be able to see
sections of the stage, but everyone
will be able to see the people in,
the boxes.
Society demands to be seen,
something that is hard at Chicago.
But some grande dame with lots
of diamonds can put on quite a
show from a box at the Met, old
or new.
This may seem a stupid con-
sideration, and indeed it is, but
these are the people who year
after year pour in money to make
up the Met's deficit, and the Met
is in no condition to bite the hand
that feeds it.

So the Metropolitan Opera has
chosen better acoustics, more good
seats, fewer really bad seats, and
a content "400."
A possible compromise between
the two extremes would be a modi-
fled horse-shoe with boxes and
balconies circling about two-thirds
of the theatre. This would enable
most of the patrons to see most
of the stage with no seats being
in a position of really obstructed
view. This would require a deeper
auditorium to keep the same seat-
ing capacity, but not very much
deeper, and the acoustics need not
be endangered at all.
THESE TWO organizations will
be the mainstays of the' new
center alonlg with the Julliard
School of Music. Nothing definite
is known about the plans for the
school except that it too will have
an auditorium for the production
of opera and concerts. -

No plans are known for the
ballet or the repertory theatre.
How will these groups cooperate?
Will something new and better
come out of this center? Or is it
simply that everything seems to
have worn out at once (about fifty
years ago) and as long as every-
one is building, why not put them
all together so the critics won't
have to spend all their money on
taxis while hopping from one
event to the other?
Should this be the case, the
Lincoln Center would be a "cul-
tural mecca" only in that it will
be a concentration of performing
organizations. Real cooperation
depends on the adaptability of the
auditoriums. If they are success-
ful, it will be an impetus toward
a working together. If not, or if
the managements of these groups
fail to come through with new
ideas for aiding each other and
themselves, the whole thing will
have been a waste.

Student of Today:
Image of the' Past
By KARL ZEISLER

_9
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7
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PHIL STANLEY JERRY LIBBY
KAY MIESEN TOM HYATT
BOB ALEXANDER HUGH SCOTT
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hugh Scott agency

RECORD CHANGERS

STUDENT existence on campus1
today seems little differentf
from that of 35 years ago; per-
haps it is more so in degree than
in kind.
It consists now as it did in the1
not-really-so-fabulous 20's of stu-
dents finding themselves under!
the goad of a faculty patently su-
perior for a midwestern campus.
And self-searching students then
as now clearly reflected the hau-
teur this superiority cast on their"
plastic minds.
Then as now there were die-
for-Rutgers Joe Colleges in verit-
able if not moth-eaten coonskin
coats and recently-proscribed ja-
lopies, contemporaneously called
flivvers. Then as now there were
the Beats, contemporaneously call-
ing themselves the Lost Genera-
tion. They were really an anchon-
ism or hangover in the mid-20's.
The true Lost Generation was
Hemingway's-the men who had
worn a uniform, whether on cam-
pus in Student Army Training
Corps, on the Western Front in
the Red Arrow Division, or driv-
ing an ambulance as he did in
Italy.
THERE was then a much sharp-
er campus cleavage between
the Greek Letter Organization
Karl Zeisler is a professor
;n the journalism department
and a graduate of the Uni-
versity. He also serves on the
Board in Control of Student
Publications.

Men and the Plebes or Independ-1
ents. It was al almost unbridge-1
able social gap between the lat-7
ter and the sorority girl. It
sparked a superheated competi-
tion for BMOC jobs such as edi-
tor of the Daily, Gargoyle, Chimes
or Ensian . . . president of the
Senior LS&A or Engineering class,
or of the Student Council.
A strong suspicion rankledj
among the Independents that the
competition was rigged, that the
fraternities ganged up to domi-
nate the Board in Control, the
class and the all-campus elec-
tions. At least the competition
kick was a far cry from apathy.
Still another element of differ-
ence was size. Eight or nine thous-
and vs. 20,000 marks a recogniz-
able difference in any communi-
ty, be it a campus, a city, an ar-
my or a denomination.
It was a walking-distance cam-
pus. When a fraternity bought
the Hoover (Ball Bearing) house
out on Washtenaw, conservatives
cried havoc. Ferj' Field and the
Arb were the farthest out educa-
tional outposts. Astronomy stu-
dents spent an evening or two at
the Observatory.
U. H1ospital had just moved
from the complex now housing
the Institute for Social Research
into its new quarters after they
had stood with bleakly boarded
windows during the war years
when the Legislature ran out of
funds.
EVEN law students, living in the
partly-completed Lawyers'
Club, the first penetration south
of the original 40 acres, steered

their unbuckled galoshes back to
the Diag for classes in old Haven
Hall. 'Time between classes was
seven minutes.
It took all afternoon to register,
including your physical, given by
medics on Waterman Gym's run-
ning track balcony. Some stu-
dents actually attended meetings
of their Lit school classes-frosh,
soph, junior and senior, that is.
Bolting academic classes thrice
meant disaster.
Two all-pervading differences
were Frosh Pots then and commu-
nal living in dorms now. Fresh-
men, wearing the gray badge of
their enforced out-group, were oc-
casionally if half-heartedly hazed
by a few sophomores. Cap Night
in Sleepy Hollow, now buried un-
der the Medical Center, was about
the biggest all-campus affair. The
bonfire where this hideous head-
gear was spectacularly consumed
engraved on alumni memories the
sea of pink, open-mouthed faces
singing "Where oh Where?"
THERE were three dorms-all
female: Martha Cook, then as
now under the William W. Cook
benevolence-a brain haven, Hel-
en Newberry and Betsy Barbour.
Dormitories, financed by the New
Deal, and Marxism came to the
campus in the 30's, and whether
the Regents ever made the con-
nection is dubious.
TheIndependent student's cas-
tle was his room, in a rooming
house or boarding house presided
over by a dean-approved land-
lady, the ultimate right field in
private enterprise.

If the male student's room was
festooned with pennants and a
No Parking sign, he either wore a
pot or was what today would be
called Gung Ho. If he bought an
extra bookcase (one had to be
furnished under University rules)
at the second hand store on S.

Difference
in degree only

,

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One of many
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Spring accents planned to harmonize or contrast
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alere you'll find everything
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Beautiful dresses of all sizes
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NEW HANDBAGS

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Co-ordinate tone
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-Al Young

I

~ICH ZI

U.
SUNDAY.- MARCH 20, 1960

AICHI

ZZINE

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