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February 05, 1960 - Image 22

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FEBRUARY 5.:1960

THEMIHIG N AIL-F |RAR|||04

.. i'1 1JlYV Fli41 U 17)OU

IRVARD ATTAINS GOAL:
California Asks Faculty Salary Rise

BERKELEY 'The Regents' of
the University of Californiathave
requested a 10 per cent salary in-
crease for all faculty members.
The increase would necessitate
a state appropriation of $5,555,000
to the nine-campus university,
The Daily Californian of Berkeley
reports.
University President Clark Kerr
explained the increase was re-
quested because "the university
has fallen five per cent behind
salary increases in major univer-
sities of the country."
He said the trend nationally is
to raise salaries another five per
cent this year, so the Regents
unanimously recommended a 10
per cent increase to catch up.
Faculty members received a five
per cent raise last year, after the
Regents had asked for 10 per cent.
In other action, the Regents ap-
pointed a three-man committee,
headed by Speaker Ralph Brown
of the state legislature, to study
the question of executive sessions.
Brown recently came out in op-
position to the closed sessions held,
by the Regents. He is the author'
of the Brown Act, which prohibits
all local government agencies
from holding closed sessions ex-
cept to discuss hiring, firing and
salaries of personnel.
*. * *
AMES - The Cardinal Guild
Senate, Iowa State University's
student government, has passed
a resolution to add one more deci-
mal place to the present grading
system.
Instead of receiving a 4.0 for
his "A" grade, a student might

receive a 3.6 or 3.9, depending on
his mastery of the course. A sug-
gested amendment has been pro-
posed, defining grade ranges as
an "A" being 3.6 to 4.0,a "B"
from 2.6 to 3.5, a "C" from 1.6 to
2.5, a "D".from .6 to 1.5, and an
"F" from .0 to .5.
Among the advantages pointed
out is the ready differentiation of
the student who just doesn't have
Rtegents Note
New Budgets
of $3 Million
Budgets initiated since Dec. 18,
1959 totaled $3,229,037, the Re-
gents were told at their January
meeting.
Research grants and contracts
made up $1,933,127 of the total.
The rest was divided as follows:
instructional programs, $761,230,
student aid which includes fel-
lowships, scholarships, and grants,
$524,554; state and public services,
$10,000; and student activities,
$116.
The money came from several
different sources with the federal
government providing $1,609,927
and foundations $750,636. The
other sources were: industry and
individuals, $451,110; endowment
income, $183,466; student fees,
$174,100; state and local govern-
ment, $56,500; and s e r v i c e
charges, $3,298.

the ability but who deserves bet-
ter than a "D" from another who
could have earned a "B" with a
little more work.
Athletic and extra-curricular
eligibility would also be affected,
since it would not be possible to
remain eligible with a straight
"C-" record.
*s
CAMBRIDGE - Harvard Uni-
versity has attained its goal of
$16,000 average professorial sal-
ary, President Nathan Pusey said
in his annual report.
* * *
PRINCETON-Otto Butz, editor
of the controversial book "The
Unsilent Generation," will no
longer be an assistant professor
of politics at Princeton University
next year.
His dismissal has aroused much
feeling in academic circles be-
cause of its apparent connection
with the book. This selection of
essays by Princeton students, ac-
cording to its critics, implies that
"orgiastic drinking parties" and
"drunken bouts at local taverns"
are Princeton's "major social
prop."
For promotions Princeton con-
siders a faculty member's scholar-
ship, quality of teaching, and
general contributions to univer-
sity life. Princeton President
Robert F. Goheen said that he did
not consider the book an example
of "good university citizenship,"
and that Butz's contract would
not be renewed in June.
Butz has questioned Goheen's
idea of good university citizen-
ship, asking "Is this conception of
citizenship keeping yourself out
of anything important, anything
controversial?"
A course evaluation issue of the
Daily Princetonian said Butz "re-
ceived almost unanimous acclaim
for being sincerely interested in
the student and making poten-
tially dull material lively and in-
teresting." He lectured one of
Princeton's most popular under-
graduate politics courses. Butz
was not universally liked by polite
faculty society, according to The
Princetonian.
DENVER-A resolution to per-
mit control of all state colleges
and universities by the Colorado
University Board of Regents has
been introduced in the Colorado
legislature.
The resolution would permit the
legislature to place other state-
supported colleges under the Re-
boards now controlling them.
It would also permit establish-
ment of University of Colorado
campuses in towns other than
Boulder.
Opposition, particularly from
agricultural interests, was likely
because Colorado State Univer-
sity is administered by the State
Board of Agriculture.

Point Four
Youth Corps
Considered
WASHINGTON (AP) - Would
well-educated Americans sign up
for two years' work on develop-
ment projects abroad as a substi-
tute for military service?
Would enough-say 10,000-be
interested in such work at soldier's
pay even without the incentive of
having it satisfy draft obliga-
tions?
Congress has been asked to find
out. And, to stimulate its interest,
Rep. Henry S. Reuss (D-Wis.)
has put in the Congressional Rec-
ord an analysis made at his re-
quest of the possible organization
and role of a "Point 4 Youth
Corps." He had on file in the
House a bill for a thorough study
of the idea.
The analysis in the Congres-
sional Record is by Arthur H.
Darken, foreign affairs specialist
on the staff of the Library of
Congress. It suggests that any
such corps contain only young
men and women'who have had at
least two years, preferably four
year, of college study. For the
women, of course, service would
be purely voluntary. Draft exemp-
tion would be an attraction only
to men.
The draft exemption would
bring its own problems. It might
attract opportunists having no
real interest in working among
retarded peoples. It might arouse
the opposition of the military
services and veteran organiza-
tions.
Darken suggested a compromise
under which there would be
offered exemption from the draft
but also exclusion from veteran
benefits.

Personality More Telling
Than Policies in Elections

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Personal attributes more than
policy statements contributed to
the development of the public
"image" of the candidates in the
last twq presidential elections, ac-
cording to four University social
scientists.
Director Angus Campbell, Phil-
lip E. Converse, Warren E. Miller
and Donald E. Stokes, all of the
University Survey Research Cen-
ter, will publish their findings in
a new book, "The American
Voter."
They found that the public was
largely unaware of Adlai Steven-
son's positions in either 1952 or
1956, despite his concentration on
foreign issues. And even after
four years in power, Pres. Dwight
D. Eisenhower was connected with
domestic issues only slightly by
the public.
This general failure to connect
issues with individuals is account-
ed for by the low level of atten-
tion that politics commands. Only
after the Chief Executive assumes
office and acts is he identified
with certain stands on national
policy.
Yet, until a candidate gains the
White House, the public is more
likely to discuss the issues in
terms of the major party image
rather than their standard bear-
er. At the same time, winning the
presidency may reshape the party
image.
"A clear example of this is pro-
vided by changes in the public at-
titude about the economic impli-
cations of a Republican adminis-
tration. Having been associated
with the great economic collapse
of 1929-1932, the Republican par-
ty was unable for 20 years to dis-
pel the notion that its return to
office would jeopardize our econ-
omic well being," the book argues.

Not until economic prosperity
had been experienced with a Re-
publican in the White House did
the party make substantial head-
way against this theme."
Also, the Eisenhower Adminis-
tration was not successful in dis-
pelling popular belief that the
GOP is the party of the great and
the Democrats the party of the
small," it adds.
"The public may have been sen-
sitive to the evidence of the busi-
ness orientation of an administra-
tion that recruited most of its
prominent officials from private
industry."
Stevenson's great public con-
cern with foreign policy made no
deep impression on the electorate
and although Eisenhower was
linked in the public mind with
questions of foreign policy more
than Stevenson, Eisenhower was
no more clearly identified with
domestic issues than Stevenson,
even after four years in the White
House.
Eisenhower's appeal, strongly
personal in 1952, became over-
welmingly so in 1956, the book
said.
"It was the response to personal
qualities - to his sincerity, his
integrity and sense of duty, his
virtue as a family man, his re-
ligious devotion and his sheer lik-
ableness that rose in the second

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RegentsGrant, Cancel Leaves;
Professors Take Sabbaticals

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Six leaves of absence were
granted, an extension of one leave
was granted and another exten-
sion cancelled by the University
Regents at their January meeting.
At the request of Prof. Robert
B. Hall of the geography depart-
ment, extension of his leave for
the 1960-61 year was cancelled.
He plans to return from Japan,
where he has been representing
the Asia Foundation, and will re-
join the Department fo Geogra-
phy in the fall.
Two of six leaves granted were
sabbaticals. One went to Prof.
Ralph W. Hammett of the archi-
tecture and design college, for
first semester, 1960-61. He plans
to continue research on the "Age
of Grand Monarchs" and its ar-
chitecture, 1500 to 1914.
The other sabbatical was
awarded to Prof. Richard L.
Weaver, of the natural resources
school and the education school.
On leave for the 1960-61 year, he
will work under a Fulbright Lec-
tureship in Pakistan. Prof. Weav-
er will be a member of a workshop
team which is to visit secondary
schools.
Prof. Earnest Boyce, chairman
of the civil engineering depart-
ment was given leave for Febru-
ary, March and April to under-
take a sanitary engineering con-
sultant assignment in India at
the request of the International
Cooperation Administration.
Roger J. Frock, research assist-
ant in the Willow Run Labora-
tories, was given leave from Jan-
Local Official
Dies of Stroke
Oswald John Koch, Ann Arbor
postmaster for 16 years, died Jan.
14 at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital.
Koch, 63 years old, was a form-
er State Highway Department
superintendent here and a local
businessman.
He lived to see his dream of a
new main post office for Ann Ar-
bor come true.

uary 17 to April 17. He will be on
active duty in the United States
Naval Reserve.
Prof. John R. Reinhard of the
English department, was granted
sick leave for second semester,
1959-60.
Sick leave granted to Prof. Ken-
neth K. Landes of the geology de-
partment, was extended from De-
cember 31, 1959 to January 31,
1960.
Prof. Leland Stowe of the jour-
nalism department, was granted
leave, without salary, for second
semester, 1959-60. As a roving edi-
tor of "Reader's Digest," he will
undertake an assignment in
Western Europe, and possibly in
North Africa and the Middle East.

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