100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 09, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY W

[A CAGE TOURNEY:
Vest Virginia, Ohio W in inFirst Round

Wy The Associated Press
11-American Jeiry West scored
points, topped the rebounders
i did most of the playmaking
night as fifth-ranked West
ginia defeated plucky Navy
86 in a first round game in
NCAA Eastern Regional Bas-
ball Tournament.
Vest's play was by far his best
New York. He hit 12 of 21 field
ls, 10 of 15 free throws, and

SUCCESSFUL
STUDENTS
LINCOLN LABORATORY
has openings for a
limited eiumber of en.
gineers, physicists and
mathematicians in orig-
inl research and
development activities.
LINCOLN LABORATORY
is on electronics research
and development center
established by M.I.T. in

grabbed 15 rebounds. He also had
five assists.
West had a good deal of help,
especially in the first half, from
Jim Warren. The 6'2" senior who
triggered West Virginia to its
sixth straight southern confer-
ence tournament championship,
had 22 'oints.
Navy ,which pulled a tremen-
dous first round upset in the
NCAA against North Carolina
last year, was led by bullish Jay
Metzler, who had 27 points and
15 rebounds.
West Virginia hit 37 of 68 field
goal attempts and 20 of 26 free.,
throws. Navy hit 35 of 77 from
the field and 16 of 25 free throws.
Ohio University overcame first
half stage fright last night and
downed Notre Dame 74-66 in the
NCAA Ban
The Daily will devote today'sl
editorial page (See Page 4), to
commentary on the Big Ten
vote to ban all post-season ac-
tivity for Conference athletes.
first game of the Mideast Region-
al of the NCAA Basketball Tour-
nament.
Ohio's Bobcats took the lead 30
seconds after the second half and
were never headed although the
Irish threatened seriously late in
the period.
After six ties in the fist half,
when the lead changed 11 times,
Ohio's Bunk Adams slipped under
for a lay-in to give the Bobcats a
33-32 edge.
Ohio turned hot for the next
eight minutes and at one point
led by 11, 50-39.
Notre Dame, with its one-guard
offense, nibbled away and came

within a point at 58-57. But the
hot shooting Bobcats soon had
the lead to a dozen at 72-60.
Howard Jollif, 6'6" junior from
Canton,. Ohio led the Bobcats
with 29 points on 11 field goals
and seven of 11 at the foul line.
John Dearie and Mike Graney
had 21 and 20, respectively, for
the Irish.
NYC Wins
Russ Cunningham broke open
Connecticut's zone defense with
some eye-popping sharpshooting
last night as New York University
whipped the Uconns 78-59 in the
opener of the first round NCAA
eastern regional tournament.
Cunningham, the team's play-
maker, hit seven of 10 shots in
the first half after the Uconns,
champions of the Yankee Confer-
ence for the tenth straight year,
had zipped into a 19-9 lead. He
added two free thiaws for a 16
point burst as the 12th ranked
Violets outscored Connecticut
31-12 in the 11 minutes and trot-
ted off with a 40-31 halftime lead.
Duke Wins
Duke, with 6'8" Doug Kistler
scoring points routed Princeton
84-60 in a first round Eastern Re-
gional game.
The game was wide open after
Duke moved to a 19-8 lead fol-
lowing an opening field goal by
Princeton's Tom Adams. Kistler,
spinning in for one easy layup
after another, stored 13 points in
succession after teammate How-
ard Hurtgot the first four.
Kistler ended up fith 26 points.
Western Kentucky Wins
Western Kentucky started out
like a snail, then moved to a
lighting 107-84 victory over Mi-
ami of Florida in a first round
Mideast Regional game.

Cincinn ati*
Wins$A
Cage Ti'tle
By The Associated Press
Cincinnati's slick Bearcats Were
the nation's No. 1 college basket-
ball team for 1959-60.
The Associated Press' final poll
of the season yesterday had the
Oscar Robertson-led B e a r c a t s
perched in the top seat - just
where they've been since the first
poll was taken in December.
Now it's to the !Ohio five to
prove its merit in the NCAA
Championshipsnagainst a talented
field that includes California's
defending champs, the No. 2
team in the poll.
Since the AP basketball poll
began in 1949, six of the 11 quin-
tets chosen for the No. 1 rating
crowned their campaigns with
NCAA titles.
A year ago, however, Kansas
State was named the top team
and then was upset in the early
NCAA eliminations. California,
ranked 11th, beat Cincinnati in
the semifinals and then edged
West Virginia for the title.
Another meeting between Cincy
and Cal would set up the game of
the year for the hardwood sport.
This is the first time Cincin-
nati ever has been chosen to lead
them all and it's only the third
time the Bearcats have made the
elite top ten. It all started with
the incomparable Robertson, of
course.
This time Cincinnati, which
wound up its regular season
Monday night with a 25-1 record,
set a front-running pace all the

Corduroy Slacks
are now on sale. '
at
$6.95
607 E. Liberty - Next to Michigan Theatre

TOP GOAUE-Denver's Joe Kirkwood was the leading goalie in
the WCHA and one of the major reasons that his team won the
championship and is an overwhelming favorite to whip Colorado
College in the playoffs for the NCAA Hockey Tournament berths.
DenerIcrsFavored
TDI o Whi CC in Playo
* *
f n aOS

1951.

OUR REPRESENTATIVE
WIL. BE ON CAMPUS
MARCH 16th
CONTACT YOURF
PLACEMENT OFFICE NOW
Research and Development
INCOLN LABORATORY
cssaclvsetts Institute of Technology

Wings Beat Canadiens, 3=0;
Hawks Overcome Pistons

MINNEAPOLIS (R) - Powerful
Denver, a team which swept every
honor in sight during the regular
season, is an overwhelmingrfavor-
ite this week to grab one of the
West's two spots in the NCAA
Hockey Tournament.
Denver meets Colorado College
and North Dakota plays Michigan
Tech in two-game playoffs Friday
and Saturday at Denver and Mich-
igan Tech.
With a 4-0 regular season record
against CC and playing on its
home ice, Denver is expected to
move through the playoff without
difficulty.
The other series, however, is un-
predictable.
Michigan Tech, which finished
second in the Western Collegiate
Hockey Assn., has split four games
with third place North Dakota.
The teams broke even in their
series at Tech.

In the event of a split in either
of the playoffs, total goals will be
used to determine the winner.
Denver won not only the sea-
sonal WCHA championship with
a 17-4-1 record but the individual
scoring and goal tending titles as
well.
Bill Masterton, a six-foot junior
from Winnipeg, was the top scor-
er with 44 points on 17 goals and
27 assists. He was followed by the
Michigan Tech trio of Paul Coppo
and John Kosiancic, 41 each, and
Gerald Fabbro, 38.
The league's best goalie was
Denver's George Kirkwood, a 22-
Year-old sophomore from Edmon-
ton, Alta., who allowed 2.3 goals
a game. George Kukulick of Tech
was second with 3.3.
Michigan State's Mel Christof-
ferson was the tough citizen of
the league, Christofferson logging
20 penalties and the most penalty
time, 48 minutes.
G A Pt&.
Bill Masterton, Denver 17 27 44
Paul Coppo. Mich. Tech 20 21 41
John Kosiancic,

" I

L: !

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-The suddenly come-
alive Detroit Red Wings caught
goalie Jacques Plante without his
famous face mask last night and
blanked the National Hockey
League Champion Montreal Cana-
diens 3-0.
Plante was unmasked for the
first time since he put on the con-
troversial protective device in a
regular game Nov. 1 at New York.
Without it the Montreal netmind-
er appeared shaky and the Wings
ended a 15-game winless streak
against Montreal on their home
Olympia Stadium ice.
Unsung Len Lunde delighted the
home crowd of 13,345 by scoring
once and assisting on another goal
as the Wings strengthened their

position for a berth in the Stanley.
Cup Playoffs.
Detroit pulled into a third-place
tie with idle Chicago, eight points
ahead of the Boston Bruins, who
are virtually out of the running.
Norm Ullman put Detroit ahead
1-0 in the first period after Lunde
dug the puck out and flipped it to;
Ullman in front of the cage.
* . .

L
}
7
"
y
a
1
T
7
f

way.
1. Cincinnati (92) (24-1)
2. California (RY) (24-1)
3. Ohio State (14) (21-3)
4. Bradley (14) (24-2)
5. West Virginia (10) (24-4)
6. Utah (2) (24-2)
7. Indiana (20-4)
8. Utah State (22-5)
9. St. Vonaventure (6) (19-3)
10. Miami (Fla.) (7) (23-3)

Students, Faculty
for 24 hr. report
on the
WEATHER
432
5 NO
6 5-8617
0
7 9
S8 9
SPONSOR
MO .RR LL'S
314 S. State NO 3-2481

1,832
1.7 16
1,492
1,396
1,001
606
460
382
312
312

BOX 21 *LEXINGTON 73
MASSACHUSETTS

Hawks Win, 122-101 r
ST. LOUIS - The St. Louis
Hawks snapped back after two de-
feats at the hands of the Detroit
Pistons and defeated the Pistons
122-101 last night to close out
their Kiel Auditorium home sea-
son with 28 victories against five
defeats.
Bob Pettit, the record breaking
scorer of one season back, topped
the Hawks with 34 points in the
National Basketball Assn. game.
Cliff Hagan scored 30 and Gene
Shue was high for Detroit with 18.

I-M Scores
SOCIAL FRATERNITY "A"
Sigma Phi Epsilon 44, Sigma
Chi 42 (first-place playoff)
Kappa Alpha Psi 48, Pi Lamb-
da Phi 26
Phi Kappa Sigma 54, Theta
Chi 18
Zeta Psi 29, Phi Epsilon Pi 28
Sigma Alpha Mu 42, Theta
Delta Chi 30
Zeta Beta Tau 36, Tau Delta.
Phi 30
SOCIAL FRATERNITY "B"
Acacia 2, Alpha Sigma Phi 0
(forfeit)

_.Michigan Tech
Gerald Fabbro,
Michigan Tech
John Macmillan, Denver
Reg Morelli. N.D.
Jerry Melinychuk, Minn.
Jerry Walker, Deniver
Lewis Angotti,
Michigan Tech
Conrad Collie, Denver

1

19 22 41

14
19
18
13
19

24 38
18 37
18 36
21 34
15 34

12 18 30
14 15 29

__ __ A_

----

-I

YOUR

ATTENTION

PLEASE

for the
university
look

J1
Ta
4E} 4 -

I

SIGN UP NOW for

an interview

III

with the COOPER - BESSEMER
CORP. representative who will be on
campus TUESDAY, MARCH 15.
COOPER-BESSEMER is one of the
most respected names in the heavy
machinery business and its products
are used in the oil, natural gas, chemi-

II

cal, general industrial,

government

and marine fields of

America

and

other countries.

Opportunities are open

in ENGI-

...THE EXPLORATION OF SPACE

NEERING,

SALES,

and MANU-

FACTURING for students with the

Since its inception nearly 23 years ago,
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has given
the free world itsfirst tactical guided mis-
sile system, its first earth satellite, and
its first lunar probe.
In the future, under the direction of the
National Aeronautics and Space Admin-
istration, pioneering on the space fron

tier will advance at an accelerated rate.
The preliminary instrument explora-
tions that have already been made only
seem to define how much there is yet
to be learned. During the next few years,
payloads will become larger, trajectories
will become more precise, and distances
covered will become greater. Inspections

will be made of the moon and the plan-
ets and of the vast distances of inter7
planetary space; hard and soft landings
will be made in preparation for the time
when man at last sets foot on new worlds.
In this program, the task of JPL is to
gather new information for a better un-
derstanding of the World and Universe.

following degrees.

ME

IE

THE JET NI
With smart new crown that is
young at heart-rugged-spirited.
Narrower carefully proportioned
brim. Perfect in town or for
that countr weekend.

"We do these things because of the unquenchable curiosity of
Man. The scientist is continually asking himself questions and
then setting out to find the answers. In the course of getting
these answers, he has provided practical benefits to man that
have.,s.o.mis.urpri.,ev.n the scientist.

Who, at this present time, can predict what potential benefits
to man exist in this enterprise? No one can sy with any accu-
racy what we will find as'we fly farther away from the earth,
first with instruments, then with man. It seems to me that we
are obligated to do these things, as human beings;

EE

CE

II

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan