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February 28, 1960 - Image 11

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Cinema Guild
Presents
Contrary to what Hollywood
would have you believe, movies
are not better than ever. This is
the basic premise on which Cine-
ma Guild exists.
For the unitate among you
CinemadGuild is a functionary of
the Student Government Council
dedicated to bringing the finest
films to Ann Arbor.
Since we have roughly 40 years
of film-making to choose from,
the general level of our program-
ming can hardly help but be high-
er than that of the three local
movie houses which are depend-
ent on current releases for their
fare. Yet people who regularly
line up in the cold before an Ann
Arbor theater, often exhibit an
indifference to Cinema Guild
movies which borders on the
colossal.
There seem to be but two pos-
sible explanations for this phe-
nomena. The first, of course, is
that most people really don't like
great movies. While this remains
a distinct possibility, we cannot
bring ourselves to accept this as
a hard fact of life.
The second possibility, and this
is the one we are endorsing, for
better or for worse, is that the
vast majority of the student body
is unaware of the high calibre of
films shown at the Architecture
auditorium every Thursday, F'-
day, Saturday and Sunday night.
* * a
TONIGHT'S offering, Gunga Din,
is an especially propitious one
to begin this column with since its
title might lead you to suspect it
is a dreary adaptation of Kipling's
poem.
Actually the film owes little to
Kipling besides the title and a
secondary character (the water
boy, naturally). Ben Hecht and
Charles MacArthur, the authors
of the script, turned the picture
into a delightful spoof of Three
Musketeer variations that Holly-
wood was turning out by the car-
load at the time.
" "
YOU old timers (over 25) should
be especially pleased at our fea-
ture next week. Mutiny on the
Bounty is, of course, one of Hol-
lywood's more memorable films.
While it is an excellent sea yarn,
it is chiefly notable for the per-
formance of the magnificent ham
Charles Laughton. Whether strut-
ting on the forcastle (or is it the
poop deck) or bellowing "Mr.
Christian" at a youthful Clark
Gable, he makes a remarkably sa-
tanic Captain Bligh.
~ PRINCE and the Showgirl
is one of those rare works
which improved in its translation
to the screen. Terrence Rattigan's
rather thin story of a showgirl-
prince romance profited by the de-
lightful performances of Sir Lau-
rence Olivier and, surprisingly,
Marilyn Monroe. This was the first
picture in which La Monroe proved
herself adept as a comedienne.
Olivier, of course, reinforces the
opinion that he is adept at every-
thing..
No one here has seen Kon-tiki
and all we can honestly say about
it is that it is a documentary ac-
tually made on Thor Heyerdahl's
raft as it floated westward across
the Pacific. It at least promises
to be interesting.
Its sister showing, however, The
Titan, can be recommended with-
out fear of contradiction. This
magnificent treatment of the life
of Michelangelo is highlighted by
the display of his works. It is
certainly one of the finest things
of its kind ever to be put on film.

LITE NEED be said of On the
Waterfront. Elia Kazan's treat.
ment of Budd Schulberg's power-
ful melodrama is probably familiar
to most of you. In case you've for-
gotten, however, let us remind you
that it's one of the better Ameri-
can films of the decade of the
1950's and Marlon Brando gives
one of his first rate performances.
-Cinema Guild Management
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

(Continued from Preceding Page)
wl:^ travel the wayward paths. It
tolei _ tes all the obscenities and
brutalities that can be visually ex-
plored as long as there is due
penitence at the end.
In the case of the highly spiced
"Happy Anniversary" David Niv-
en's premarital relations with his
wife are fully sanctified by the
Code as long as Mr. Niven even-
tually repents for his promiscuous
activities. From this striking ex-
ample one may justifiably specu-
late how moral the "moral ten-
ants" of the Code actually are.
In addition to this thriving
hypocrisy in the industry's ranks,
the Code more than anything else
has brought about the typically
slick totally unrealistic Hollywood
ending to situations which have
obvious tragic elements at work.
Nowhere was this more apparent
than in the totally inept Edith
Sommers - Mannie Rubin adapta-
tion of Broadway's successful
"Blue Denim."
IN THE ORIGINAL production
the great tragedy of the piece
was the youngsters' inability to
communicate with their parents.
This resulted in Janet's successful
abortion at the climax. But in the
film the original meaning and ef-
fectiveness of the play was com-
pletely mutilated. In fact the au-
thors have gone to such extremes
to make their theme acceptable to
the Code that the word "abortion"
is never actually used.
But what was primarily lacking
is the tragedy's inability to come
to fruition. To accommodate the
unyielding code the boy had to
tangibly pay for his impulsive
sexual indulgence regardless of
how unrealistic and disappointing
the resolution would be. The trag-
edy which was basically Janet's
was transferred as a result to her
lover Arthur. And in this mud-

dling translation the potency of
the original work was sacrificed.
"The Shaggy Dog" chase which
allows the girl to be rescued from
the hands of her unprincipled doc-
tor at the last moment is prob-
ably representative of the most
astonishing mishandling of an
adaptation in several years.
BESIDESTHE BASIC codal ten-
ants the industry must abide
by, there are other obstacles which
must be surpassed in the transfer
to celluloid.
Too often the screen's immense
quality acts to totally overwhelm
and dwarf the material. Such is
the case in the Samuel Goldwyn
production of "Porgy and Bess"
which was filmed in the Todd-AO
widescreen process.
In "Porgy and Bess" we have a
story approaching epic propor-
tions. This is because the Gershwin
work does not confine itself ex-
clusively to a crippled beggar's love
for a sensual woman and her ulti-
mate rejection of him. But rather
"Porgy and Bess" concentrates on
graphically illustrating a way of
life.
Although a great deal of the
film's beauty lies in its tragic love
story much of the brilliance is
derived from the setting and
mores of the personages of Cat-
fish Row. Indeed the settings and
mores are such an integral part
of the story that to subordinate
them to the background dimin-
ishes the greatness of the achieve-
ment.
Thus to accommodate a work as
towering as Gershwin's and give
it sufficient mobility the use of the
broad expansive screen becomes
quite necessary.
BUT TO MAINTAIN complete
honesty with the viewer it
must be said that there are far
too many moments in the film

Porgy and Bess

when the wide screen becomes a
considerable hindrance. This is
especially noticeable in the se-
quences between Sidney Poitier's
"Porgy" and Dorothy Dandridge's
"Bess."
During these moments the
sweeping vistas of the wide screen
prevents the necessary quality of
intimacy from reaching to the
audience. And it was Gershwin's
intensely intimate love story which

contributed so significantly to the
startling brilliance of the original
work.
Somehow or other in the current
Goldwyn production the audience
is able to detach itself far too
frequently from the proceedings.
And this brings us to considera-
tion of a second major point. The
motion picture medium is a dis-
tinct art in itself and an art form
in which certain basic essentials

must
cessft
mere]
lettin;
night
Su(
yield
tatio
Mr. t
sider:
trans
Krarr
to Mi
IIIH
ment
comp
tural
stage
Ho
realh
do n
rigor(
treats
ceeds
andi
the
missi
rectl3
O'Nei
as wi
coted
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adapt
first :
provi
curre
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ings
adult
both
Lond
A
Sop
lege
Dai

Motion Picture Adaptati

U...' .

DEPARTMENT OF

SPEECH

PLAN

TUESDAY, 8:00 P.M., Richard Wac
D S RHEING4
Box office open tomorrow, 10 A.
Tickets available for Tues. performar

C

TO TICKET HOLDERS: The producers wish to
make an urgent plea that you make every ef-
fort to arrive before curtain time-8:00 p.m.,
so as to not disturb other patrons with late
seating.

MORE "BLOCKBUSTER" VALUES
Modern Library GIANTS-Only $295 Each
Sturdy, definitive editions ... 600 to 1,400 pages per volume

Get tickets NOW for...
William Congreve's masterpiece of resto
THE WAY OF THE WC
Wednesday-Saturday, April 6-
Box office open all this week
or use coupon below to order
bymail

081. AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF
MODERN AMERICAN HUMOR
029. THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO
and THE CONQUEST OF PERU
G76. TALES OF GRIMM AND
ANDERSEN
655. NINE PLAYS DY EUGENE
O'NEILL
677. ANTHOLOGY OF FAMOUS
AMERICAN STORIES
634. PHILOSOPHY OF
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
61. WAR AND PEACE
G53. COMPLETE NOVELS OF
JANE AUSTEN
G44. U. S. A.
40. THE.COMPLETE TALES AND
POEMS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE
039. THE.BASIC WRITINGS OF
SIGMUND FREUD
974. THE CITY OF GOD
60. THE FAULKNER READER
"7. AN ANTHOLOGY OF FAMOUS
ENGLISH & AMERICAN
POETRY;
065. TECMPLETE WORKS
QA.OF RAIELAISEWOK
GS. PLUTARCH'S LIVES
027. THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES &
THE DESCENT OF MAN

G52. ULYSSES
032. THE WEALTH OF NATIONS
024. CAPITAL by Karl Mont
G14. BULFINCH'S MYTHOLOGY
059. THE WISDOM OF CHINA
AND INDIA
049. Mark Twain's TOM SAWYER
and HUCKLEBERRY FINN
G0. AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY
072. GREAT TALES OF TERROR
& THE SUPERNATURAL
021. SIXTEEN FAMOUS
AMERICAN PLAYS
G18. ELEVEN PLAYS OF IBSEN
063. SIXTEEN FAMOUS
BRITISH PLAYS
G22. THIRTY FAMOUS
ONE-ACT PLAYS
073. A SUBTREASURY OF
AMERICAN HUMOR
031. FAMOUS SCIENC.
FICTION STORIES
654. ANTHOLOGY OF
BRITISH STORIES
049. GREAT DETECTIVE STORIES
09. GREAT VOICES OF
THE REFORMATION
044. NEW ANTHOLOGY OF
MODERN POETRY

ADDRESS. ~is~ tfii~ifii414rii ii~~ ~i

LABORATORY PLAYBILL
admission free
Thursdays, 4:10 P.M.
March 3, Maurice Maeterlinck's
THE INTRUDER*
March 10, (anonymous pirated ver-
sion of HAMLET) --
FRATRICIDE PUNISHEDt
March 17, Christopher Fry's
A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENTt
March 24, Michael deGhelderode's
ESCURIAL

ORDER h
Enclosed find $ for.
for THE WAY OF THE WORL
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PLEASE CHECK ONE:
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1960

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