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February 25, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY l

-. _ o . .

VATHEN, LOCKE, RADFORD:
Wolverine Shot-Putters Improve

the game s n
the thi 91
Fred .Katz, r4ssociate Sports Editor

i

By ROY RHAESA
The rules state that you have to
ay in a six-foot circle while you
y to throw a 16-pound ball as
r as possible.
This is the definition of one of
le less glamorous events in track
nd field: shot-putting.
Every day at Yost Field House,
iree sophomores on Coach Don
anham's track squad practice to
irow that 16-pound sphere as
tr as they can. They are Ray
ocke, Terry Trevarthen and Bill
adford.
Most impressive of the trio

presently is Trevarthen. In the
intra-squad meet in December he
won the shot put with a toss of
49,5". In the two meets with the
Chicago Track Club, he came in
first again with marks of 51'4"
and 50'2".
In high school le had a high of
42'6" with the 12-pound shot.
Changing his style he has in-
creased his distance considerably
and in last week's Michigan Open
he had his best toss to date-52'5".
Locke's high school career was
somewhat opposite that of Tre-
varthen's. His personal record in

high school' was a phenomenal
V4'Op".
Using the larger ball he took
second in the Michigan AAU Re-
lays with 51'4" and later also took
second in the Michigan Open with
his top toss in varsity competition,
which. measured 51'7".
Service Champion
Radford never put the shot
while in high school but took up
the event while in the service and
was proficient enough at it to be-
come the Far Eastern Inter-Serv-
ice Champion.
Radford placed second to Tre-
varthen in the meet here with the
Chicago Track Club. His best
mark, however, was set at the
Michigan State Relays when he
got away a 50'5" throw.
All believe that they can im-
prove in time. Radford hopes to
hit 55' in two years and Locke

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TERRY TREVARTHEN
...*top shot-putter
has his sights set on a goal of over
55' in the next few seasons.
No Goal
Trevarthen has- no personal
goal for he feels that if one has
goals and falls short of them, dis-
couragement and subsequent loss
of incentive will set in.
Goals or no goals, these men will
be trying to improve on their past
performances when they compete
this Saturday night in a dual
meet with Michigan State at East
Lansing.

WITH MEN who know their basketball best, it's California, 2-1.
That's this week's verdict of the 35 coaches who each Sunday
finger the nation's top-ranking college teams for United Press-Inter-
national. Twenty-four members of the selection board see the Golden
Bears (21-1) as the front runner. The defending NCAA champions'
closest competitor, Cincinnati, (20-1) received only one-third as many
first-place votes. Ohio State (19-2) got the nod on two other bal-
lots, while the remaining selector took Bradley (21-2).
The coaches appear so united in their choice for the number
one spot that most non-partisan fans would be willing to accept their
consensus. Willing, that is, until they picked up another paper and
saw where the nearly 200 sportswriters polled by the Associated Press
overwhelmingly favor Cincinnati as America's best team. California
comes out no better than fourth.
All of which leads to the conclusion that polls are full of sound
and fury but signify little.
THE REAL TEST of truth comes in two weeks with the beginning
of the regional playoffs. All arguments will be settled for good
March 19 when the western and eastern champions clash in the title
match at San Francisco's Cow Palace.
Combining the luck of the draw with the season-long form chart,
It would appear now that Ohio State should wander into the finale
facing either Cincinnati or California.
This *riter, usually a strong defender of exciting midwest bas-
ketball, finds it difficult to disagree with the coaches' consensus that
California is the finest in the land.
It's been seven years since the Big Ten last took the national
crown (Indiana In 1953) and the Buckeyes figure as the Conference's
best representative since then. But OSU and its magnificent sopho-
mores are still a year away from displaying all the earmarks of an
unbeatable team. They undoubtedly have the greatest all-around of-
fensive balance and depth of the top contenders. Lucas, Havlicek,
Nowell, Siegried and Roberts are all good for 25 points on any given
night.
But the Bucks have a defense that hasn't matured with their of-
fensive might, even though their allotment of 70 points per Big Ten
game is the league's best. They simply outgun their rivals, as exem-
plified by their 96-95 win over Indiana or last Saturday's 84-83 de-
feat of Michigan State.
CINCINNATI, too, is essentially the same kind of run-and-shoot
club but without the amazing balance. The Bearcats aren't a one-
man club by any means as many would suppose with the presence of
Oscar Robertson, but his 40 points a game account for nearly half
of the team's output. A good team that can bottle him up has the
major part of the battle won. And Bradley proved you can still let
the Big "O" run wild and whip the Bearcats by taking advantage of
a sometimes-poitus defense.1
The key word in analyzing the inadequacies of both OSU and
Cincy is one that Pete Newell and his California team have concen-
trated and capitalized on - defense.
The Bears have It down pat. Their foes averaged a mere 51
points per game last year. And the champs are a better team, offen-
sively and defensively, this season.
IN THE FINALS of the Los Angeles Basketball Classic in December,
the Bears harnessed West Virginia in spectacular fashion, 65-45.
It was billed as a rematch of the NCAA finals last season which Cal
took by one. But the Bears squelched thp Mountaineers, averaging
more than 80 points prior to the showdown, at every turn. The losers
were held to a paltry 39 shots.
Even more astounding, everybody's All-American Jerry West col-
lected only eight points as a 6'6" stringbean with the unlikely name
of Tandy Gillis shadowed him all night and still found time to grab
18 points.
Another skyscraper, 6'10" Darral Imhoff, settled for only five
points, but he hauled in 21 rebounds and rarely gave the Mountain-
eers a chance at a second shot.
UCLA coach John Wooden called the shots perfectly to this writer
before the title game began in illustrating what makes the Bears tick.
Said the veteran coach: "A lot of people call West the best player
in the country. Maybe he is - I don't know. But I do know that if
I could have any player I wanted, I wouldn't hesitate in picking Im-
hoff. He guards that basket so well, you don't have a chance."
The work of All-American Imhoff under the boards and a host
of defensive demons running all over the floor make the Bears nearly
unstoppable once they grab the lead. A 10-point California lead is
comparable to twice that much for most other teams.
It's not fun for a midwesterner to admit, but it looks like the
UPI's coaches are right. Come March 19, California will keep the
NCAA championship trophy in the San Franosco Bay area for the
fourth time in six years.

I
s
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Cle
assi
tal
Oly
a9
por
fen
tie.
af t
the

TOM OSTERLAND
. readies for Spartans

Gymnasts Face
N MSU Tomorrow

U.S. Icers Top Gray
woed en Ties Russia, 2-w2,

By CLIFF MARKS
The top gymnastic treat of the
season is in store for gym fans
tomorrow night when arch-rival
Michigan State brings its unbeat-
en record to Ann Arbor in an at-
tempt to convince the improving
Wolverines.
Coach Newt Loken has billed
the affair as "The Dual Meet of
the Year," which will find the
hosts facing a dual challenge,
hand the Spartans their first de-
feat, and get in their final prepa-
ration for next weekend's Big Ted.
Meet at Minneapolis.-
Not only is State's team unde-
feated, but so are three men, Stan
Tarshis, Angelo Festa, and John
Daniels, in the high bar, still rings
and free exercise respectively.

7

By The Associated Press
3QUAW VALLEY, Calif. - Bill
ary scored four goals, three un-
isted, as the United States re-
ned its perfect record in the
'mpic hockey round robin with
-1 rout of Germany yesterday.
'he victory took on added im-
rtance when Sweden held de-
ding champion Russia to a 2-2
ils Nilsson scored both goals
fer the Swedes, beaten 6-3 by

a
7
i
1

e United States

Monday, had I

The meet will also bring to-
gether two top 'rebound tumbling'
teams with Loken ranking them
about even. "But, in this and
many of the other events, the out-
come will depend on who's hitting
their routines best. Every point is
going to count heavily tomorrow
night," he said.
The invaders from Lansing
have three strong men in the
event, Chuck Thompson, Steve
Johnson, and Tom Temple. These'
three will match up with Michi-
gan's "Tramp Twins" Tom Oster-
land and T. Francis in addition
to dependable senior Al Stall,
competing in his last home meet
along with Wolf Dozauer.
Tumbling Battle
Another top battle is expected
in tumbling where Daniels also
competes. Captain Bill Skinner
and Jim Brown have formed a
formidable duo all year for Michi-
gan. However, Brown is not at.
full strength. He is still not fully
recovered from an injured ankle
and Loken was uncertain as to his
status.
"We'll Just have to see how it is
tomorrow night," he said.
Ldken will be; working all his
men to capacity in the meet, and,
hoped that his nine-man squad
would be able to keep up the pace
against the favored visitors.
Although the Spartans have yet
to lose, a strong Iowa team did tie
them the night before invading
the Wolverines' 'lair' two weeks
ago. That was a disastrous night
for Michigan as the Hawkeyes
romped, but Loken is looking for
a closer meet tomorrow.

ut soft! What taste from
yonder FILTER-BL

T idwell Aim
For 'M' Cage
Point Mark
John Tidwell moved a step clos-
er to setting an all-time Michigan4
single season scoring record this
week as he tossed in 27 points
against Wisconsin to up his total
to 430 points.
Tidwell, who has led the team
in scoring throughout the cam-
paign, has three more games to
pick up the 30 points he needs to
equal the record of 460 set by
M. C. Burton last year. He needs
only 45 more to top the 900 mark
for his two seasons of varsity
competition.
If he continues to score at his
present rate he will top both
marks at Illinois next Monday.
As a result of the 28 point
splurge against Wisconsin, Lovell
Farris has tightened the gap be-
tween himself and Terry Miller in
the team scoring derby, behind
Tidwell.
Farris now trails Miller by 31
points in total scoring over the 21
game route. The scrappy center
also leads the team in rebounds,
holding a commanding lead over
Tidwell who is second.
However burly Bob Brown is
close in the rebounds per game
department as he has pulled down
an average of nine per game,
while Farris has averaged slight-
ly more than 10.
The Michigan scoring statistics

battled the Russians through two
scoreless periods.
The United States, second vic-
tory without a defeat in the cham-
pionship round gave the Ameri-
cans a tie with Canada, which
downed Czechoslovakia 4-0 in the
final game last night. Canada,
which has not permitted a goal
by the opposition in the two games,
plays the United States today.
Russia, 1-0-1, takes on winless
Germany.
Eugeni Grishin, Russia's world
champion speed skater, beat Amer-
ica's Bill Disney out of a gold
medal yesterday by one-tenth of a
second In 500-meter race at the
Winter Olympics.
United States hopes in the men's
figure skating also suffered a set-
back when David Jenkins wound
up third after three compulsory
figures. Karol Divin of Czechoslo-
vakia was first and Alain Giletti
of France second.
In the only other gold medal:
event of the day, Ernst Hinterseer,
a Kitzbuhel farmer, captured the
men's slalom and restored Aus-
tria's badly damaged skiing pres-
tige.

"You could compare this con-
test to the Indiana-Michigan ,
swim meet for equality,"he said,
"with the only difference being
that we're not unbeaten."
Loken was expecting a big
crowd for the contest and said
that there would be "plenty of
room for all." He added that the
home crowd will definitely help
the team's morale.
"The boys are reaching a peak
and we hope to do as well -as last
week against Wisconsin. If we
'hit,' we'll have that added confi-
dence for the Big Ten meet."

LENDI. *

CUos- Meet

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fo
n
t
3
Z
1
3
r
1

Tidwell
Miller
F'arris
Hall
Waentz
Clark
Rlobinh
Meyer
Brown
HIiggs
Sangster
D~onley
Schoenherr
Zimmnermani
Lyons
TOTALS

G
21
21
21
5
12
11
3
9
7
7
5
16
16
6
21

FG
166
127
97
21
41
24
6
10
10
s
6
3
e
1
L526

FTA-FT
129-98
69-56
124-85
16- 5
23-12
25-12
4- 3
29-19
8- 1
9- 6
3- 2
25-12
0- 0
3- 2
0- 0
t469-313

Avg.
20.3
14.8
13.3
9.4
7.8
5.5
5.0
4.3
3.0
3.1
2.8
1.5
0.4
0.4
0.3
r65.0

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