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February 25, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Sou

th Will Use Filibuster
Sidetrack Legislation

GERMAN WORRY:
Children Not Given Facts of Nazi P*ur

To

i

1!

MISSILE RACE:
Secret Testimony Fails
To Settle Senate Fe ud

WAS INGTON ( -A Hours of
secret testimony by Allen. W.1
Dulles yesterday failed to bring
agreement among Democratic and
Republican Senators on whether
the United States is catching up
with Russia in the missile field.
Dulles, director of the Central
Intelligence Agency, made a return
appearance before the Senate
space and preparedness subcom-
mittees in its prolonged inquiry
into the "missile gap" dispute.
Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (D-
Tex.), chairman of both subcom-
mittees, said some new material
was presented "but I could not
say the confusion has been claii-
fled."
Difficulty Amazing
"It is amazing how difficult It
is to get a simple statement of
facts," he added.
Sen. Stuart Symington (D-Mo.)
said Dulles' testimony "confirms
the-fact that there is no justifica-
I 1
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THE DASCOLA BARBERS
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tion for elimination of the 3 to 1,
or reduction of the gap ratio."
Russia was estimated last year to
have a 3-1 lead over the United
States in the missile race.
However, two Republicans, Sens.
Leverett Saltonstall of Massachu-
setts and Clifford P. Case of New
Jersey, joined in saying Dulles had
removed all confusion.
Saltonstall said Dulles' testi-
mony removed possibly misunder-
standings between previous state-
ments by Dulles and by Gen.
Nathan F. Twining, chairman of
the join chiefs of staff.
Missile Gap Narrower
Center of the controversy is the
testimony by Twining and Secre-
tary of Defense Thomas S. Gates,
Jr., that recent intelligence esti-
mates indicated the missile gap
had been narrowed this year com-
pared to last.
After Dulles testified the first
time, some senators said the pic-
ture he painted was not nearly so
bright, although they didn't dis-
close what Dulles actually said.
Twining also startled members
of the subcommittees in followup
testimony by saying that he never
saw certain missile charts pre-
sented by Dulles.
Johnson said some of Dudles'
testimony today may prove helpful
to committeemen after study.

Group Fights
Civil Rights.
Senate Battle
Johnson Requests
Continuous Sessions
WASHINGTON (P)--Southern-
ers, outnumbered in the Senate's
civil rights battle, announced to-
day they'll fight back with all the
obstructive tactics of a filibuster.
Beginning tomorrow, Sen. Rich-
ard B. Russell, (D-Ga.) said, the
southerners will not permit the
Senate to transact any business
that requires unanimous consent.
The unanimous consent device is
much used to speed along Senate
work, and its absence could be a
considerable handicap.
Russell said obstructive devices
would be in order as retaliation to
the call by Sen. Lyndon B. John-
son (D-Tex.), the Senate leader,
to begin around-the-clock Senate'
sessions on Monday.
Continuous Sessions Expected
Continuous sessions could be
expected to wear down physically
the southerners fighting off new
federal rights legislation. Russell
called the proposal a "kind of leg-
islative torture."
However, a foremost backer of
rights legislation, Sen. Jacob K.
Javits (R-N.Y.), proceeded on the
assumption that day and night
sessions are a certainty, and a
necessity if the Senate is ever to
pass on whether to help southern
Negroes vote.
"As we get into 'round-the-clock
sessions and some understandable
irritation of tem ┬░rs on the sub-
ject," Javits told the Senate.
Cites Demonstrations
As symptomatic of these issues,
Javits cited demonstrations in
Tennessee, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Virginia cities where
Negroes have been demanding
equal service at lunch counters.
In Chattanooga, he said, sit
downs by Negroes "did erupt into'
a racial riot" and "what is hap-
pening is symptomatic of the re-
fusal to accept a suppressed
status."
Sen. Johnson, a potential candi-
date for the Democratic presiden-
tial nomination who needs both
southern and northern support,
told newsmen:
"The Senate is determined to
pass an effective bill to guarantee
effective voting rights.
Members Determined
"Many members are equally de-
termined to discuss this subject
fully and thoroughly.
"I respect both desires and since
there is much pressing Senate
business ahead of us, the only way
I know in which both desires can
be met is to lengthen the daily
Senate session."
Yesterday's session lasted more
than 11 hours, and Johnson said
he expected nothing shorter than
12 hours on the remaining days of
this week.
In a parliamentary maneuver,
Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R-Ill.),
the Senate minority leader, moved
today to offer the administration's
civil rights program as a substi-
tute for the bill now before the
Senate.

By RICHARD O'REGAN
Associated Press Staff Writer
MUNICH--Ask German school
children how Hitler treated the
Jews and what do they reply?
"I don't know anything about
Hitler and the Jews. When I ask
my parents what happened they
say, 'You wouldn't understand'."
"My parents don't tell me any-
thing. They just say I wouldn't
sleep."
"Why don't they write some-
thing in our history books about
this? Why do they write only
about the military side of the
war?"
These are extracts from com-
positions by children in a Munich
school.
Blanket of Silence
In the recent wave of anti-
Semitic outrages in West Ger-
many, authorities were shocked
that many incidents were com-
mitted by youths who were not
old enough, as children, to have
been influenced by Nazi propa-
ganda.
Schools were attacked from
many quarters for casting a great
blanket of silence over recent his-
tory. Parents similarly were ac-'
cused by educators for failing to
inform their children.'
A great debate now is going on
how much children should be told.
In a state-'un school here, the
principal sought to find out how
much his students knew. Two
questions were put to 226 children,
aged 12 to 16. They were:
"What do you know about Hit-
ler's relationship to the Jews?"
and "What is your opinion of the
anti-Jewish expressions in various
West German cities?"
"The results, published in the
Stueddeutsche Zeitung," showed
that 60 of the 226 students knew
absolutely nothing about Hitler
and the Jews. Three boys from a
class of 13-year-olds turned in
completely blank papers.
Others among the 60 confined
themselves to writing: "Unfortun-
ately I cannot write about this
theme because I have never heard
anything about it" -- "I really4
don't know anything about this"
-- "Hitler ruled up to 1945. Prob-
ably he did not do the Jews any
good."
Fifteen said they knew nothing
about the recent incidents in
Germany.
The children rarely knew the

numbers of Jews who died under
Hitler. When figures were given
they were listed mostly as "thou-
sands." Only seven of the 226 stu-
dents knew the facts - that six
million Jews perished.
Seventeen of the children ex-
pressed definite anti-Jewish sen-
timents. Twenty interpreted Hit-
ler's treatment of the Jews as
harmless.
'War Against the Jews'
Twelve-year-old Christa was
one who knew nothing of the Jew-
ish exterminations. She wrote:
Titan Soars
Success fully,
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (A) -
A Titan missile raised America's
hopes of narrowing the missile gap
with Russia yesterday when it
successfully flew the intercontin-
ental range course for the first
time.
The 98-foot giant, being devel-
oped as this nation's most potent
military rocket, hurled an opera-
tional type nose cone 5,007 miles
to an intended target off the
South Atlantic island of Ascen-
sion.
A data capsule was ejected from
the nose cone after it plunged
through the intense heat of re-
entry into the earth's atmosphere.
The temperature on the surface
of the cone reached ,about 12,000
degrees fahrenheit.
Two hours later a recovery ship
plucked the capsule from the
water.' It contained instruments
to record the cone's performance.
The Air Force announced yes-
terday's test was successful.
The success is certain to relieve
some of the pressure on the Titan,
which has been under severe Con-
gressional criticism- because of a
series of failures dating to last
May.
In that 10-month period, only
one Titan was launched success-
fully. This was Feb. 2 when sec-
ond-stage ignition was achieved
for the first time. That rocket
went 2,000 miles.
Three days later trouble again
hit the program when one of the
big missiles exploded in flight aft-
er its nose cone fell off and it went
out of control.

"Hitler made war against the
Jews. The Jews had to wear swas-
tikas and were not allowed in
shops. Hitler killed himself be-
cause he had suffered so much."
Eleven of the children wrote
that they were told nothing at
home about the Hitler period.
Others said they learned nothing
in school either.
Oine 18-year-old wrote: "In his-.
tory, we have not yet reached the
period after 1900. I only know that
Hitler regarded the German race
as being the only worthwhile
one."
Those children who mentioned
the extermination of the Jews
mostly attributed this to Nazi race
theories or to religious grounds.
One wrote: "Many people were
jealous of the Jews because they
were mostly rich people and knew
how to trade."
Others explained the persecu-
tions like this:
"The Jews were persecuted by
the Germans because they sold to
other countries, particularly Rus-
sia and Czechoslovakia, and re-
vealed to them new and old se-

crets" -- "Through their t
and haggling, the endangeret
German economy" - "Prol
Hitler had had experiences
the Jews. Therefore he hated
and had thousands of them g
in concentration camps."
Those children who wrote a
the, recent anti-Semitic incid
mostly were critical of them.
In one class where a tea
had given the children de:
historical information over
years 1933-1945, the.reaction
more positive. Wrote a. 13-:
old girl: "I don't understand
so manyepeople say, 'Oh
those times are gone.' It is
those times are gone, but cax
forget Hitler's cruelty and
suffering of the poor Jews? :
No."
Only one boy saw a dange
the new German democrac
the recent anti-Jewish incid
He asked: "Have the former r
changed their minds overnig
Then he wrote about the re
desecration of the Amberg F
gogue and closed with the i
tion:
"How will it all end?"

__ _ _ _ ,

Burnmuda
ladabout...

LYNDON B. JOHNSON
... continuous sessions
TOP U.S.:
Redts See
New Rise
NEW YORK-The Soviet Union
considers the present balance of
power only temporary, correspond-
ent Whitman Bassow of the Co-
lumbia Broadcasting Co. told the
second annual Conference for
College Editors.
The USSR expects to pass the
United States in economic power
in "20-odd-years," Bassow said,
and realizes a period of peace is
necessary for attainment of thisj
goal.
Premier Nikita Khrushchev has,
called the Western world "a tired
mare" whose problem is not Ito
put on weight, but to stay alive."
As present colonies become in-
dependent, the present colonial
powers will lose both resources and
markets.
Thus weakened, thedcapitalist
countries will be forced to tarn
to socialism. The newly indepen-
dent nations will not adopt social-
ism spontaneously, following the
example of the Soviet Union,
which has made tremendous gains
and which has no "record" as a
colonial power.

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Second Front Page
Thursday, February 25, 1960 Page 3

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