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August 30, 1963 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I'

WELCOME,
STUDENTS!
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COACHES' RESPONSIBILITY:
Crisler Urges Prevention of Gamblng

Trimester To Help,
Harm 'M' Athletics

By JIM BERGER
Associate Sports Editor
H. O. (Fritz) Crisler, Michigan's
athletic director, maintains the
college coaches have to take a per-
sonal approach to prevent gain-
bling scandals similar, to" those
which shook the National Football
League this year.
Crisler said that "here at Michi-
gan the coaches talk seriously to
the athletes and warn them of
the implication involved in having
anythingto do with professional
gamblers."
The point of controversy in the
recent professional football crack-
down are the so-called "cards"
which are distributed by bookies
and gamblers. These cards list var-
ious football games and give the

point spreads. In addition to the
various professional games, there
are college games on the cards.
Must Legislate r
Crisler is definitely in favor of;
getting the college games off these
betting cards. "The only way that
it can be done is through legisla-
tion," Crisler said. "Most coaches
feel the same way I do about this
kind of thing."
The Michigan athletic directorj
recalled incidents when he was
coaching when gamblers would try
to seek" information about the
team. "I can remember many tele-
phone calls I used to get from men
who would say, for example, 'this
is the Associated Press in New
York' and they would ask about
injuries and what kind of shape
the team is in," Crisler said.
"It was quite obvious that these
people were gamblers because in
this case why would the AP in
New York call when they could call
from Detroit," he explained. "What
I would always do was tell them
that I was busy at the moment
but I would call them back and I
asked for their name and number.
"At this point the telephone

would click because they didn't
want to give their names," Crisler
said. "Last year Bump (Elliott,
Michigan's football coach) and
Dave (Strack, Michigan's basket-
ball coach) were called on several
occasions, and they did the same
thing.
"After a while I didn't get called
anymore because the word got
around their 'professional frater-
nity' and subsequently Michigan
appeared very seldom on the
cards," he continued. "Even now
Michigan doesn't appear much on
the cards."
Crisler pointed out an' incident
about three years ago when a
Michigan athlete got into trouble.
"This boy didn't do anything dis-
honest," Crisler said. "He was just.
distributing' the cards to. his
friends."
Not Concerned
Crisler said that he didn't con-
cern himself that much with the
recent NFL controversy. "That is
professional sports and they have
completely different rules to en-
force punishments than college
coaches do."
Crisler also said that he has

never heard of any "pressure" on
college coaches to "beat the spot."
"Just about every coach I know
is happy enough just to win and
they usually don't care by how
much."

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FRITZ CRISLER
... fools phony phoners

What effects will the proposed
trimester have on intercollegiate
athletics at Michigan?
H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler, Michigan
athletic director, sees both advan-
tages and disadvantages in the
new plan, which would institute a
15-week summer session approach-
ing a par with the fall and spring
semesters traditionally offered at
Michigan.
Michigan Only One
Michigan is presently the only
university in the Big Ten which
has made changes in the calendar
to accommodate the system. All
the other schools have either the
quarter system or semester plan.
Michigan's move has been to
prepare to carry through a tri-
mester schedule-if the state Leg-
islature in its spring session will
vote a $6 million appropriation
to meet demands for faculty pay
boosts and facility upgrading.
"In the fall and spring I think
the trimester could present us with
some difficulties," Crisler said.
"But I think it would work out
well for the most part in the win-
ter season."
No Summer Athletics
Crisler pointed out that the
summer session under the tri-
mester \vould be without intercol-
legiate athletics. It was thought by
some people at one time that if
an effective trimester could be in-
stituted by many schools that it
could be a great thing for inter-,
collegiate baseball sincefcolleges
could carry a lengthy summer
schedule.
Even if schools adopted the tri-
mester it would be a difficult thing
to start any kind of summer in-
tercollegiate competition, Crisler
said. Students today are too used
to the summer vacation and it
has become part of the American
educational system to have it. Be-
sides, many students depend on
the summer vacation for jobs, he.
added.
Crisler cited Pittsburgh as an
example of the trimester in opera-
tion. "During the regular year,
Pittsburgh has an enrollment of
9000," he said. "But during the
summer semester it is reduced to

approximately one-fifth that num-
ber."
He pointed out that a good
percentage of the students attend-
ing the summer semester at Pitts-
burgh are graduate students who
are finishing up to get their de-
grees.
The original intention of the
state universities in adopting the
trimester was to utilize the school
facilities to full advantage over
the summer months, Crisler said.
However, if only that small a
number of people take advantage
of the summer session (using the
Pittsburgh example) it is certain-
ly lacking something in fulfilling
its purpose.
Getting back to Michigan ath-
letics under the trimester, Crisleq
said that Michigan is already hav-
ing problems in the fall with the
new system. "We had to get spe-
cial permission from the Big Ten
to start football practice for next
fall earlier than the other schools,"
he said.
"In the winter, I think the tri-
mester will work out quite well,"
he continued. "It will give us a
long, interrupted period for the
winter sports season."
Two Winter Breaks
Under the semester system,
Michigan has two substantial win-
ter breaks. Both the long Christ-
mas vacation and the exam period
which ensued about a month later
caused scheduling problems.
"In the spring again there is a
possibility of some definite prob-
lems," he said. "Under 'the trimes-
ter plan, it is conceivable that
the Conference meets would occur
at the exact time as the exam per-
iod. If this is the case, we probably
wouldn't be able to participate."
Crisler said that the ideal situa-
tion would be to have every con-
ference school conform to one par-
ticular type of school calendar
whether it be the trimester, semes-
ter or quarter system.
"Even in our periods without in-
terruptions. other schools will be
having exams on other systems
and this also presents many dif-
ficulties in scheduling," he said.
-gim Berger

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Olympics Could Boost
Detroit's Pride, Image

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By DAVE GOOD
Sports Editor
Detroit's chances of wresting
the 1968 Olympic Games away
from its three rival bidders -
Mexico City, Buenos Aires, andl
Lyons, France-appear to be get-
ting dimmer and dimmer, but if,
the International Olympic Com-,
mittee should select Detroit at its
October meeting, the state of

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Michigan would stand to receive
an economic impact of nearly
$146 million.
On the surface, this looks like
it would be a healthy shot in. the
arm to the state's financial
troubles. The real benefits, how-
ever, would be expressed more in
terms of pride in accomplishing
a worthwhile project than. in
money.
This is the considered opinion
of Prof. Alfred W. Swinyard, who
reached the figure in a study of
expenditures released through the
Bureau of Business Research of
the University Graduate School of
Business Administration.
No Money Solution
"I don't see that this is any
terrific help for Michigan's fi-
nancial problems," Swinyard:said.
"I don't look to this as a solu-
tion. But as far as helping build
a more favorable image of the
state and of Detroit, it's hard to
imagine anything that could be
more important than getting the
Games here.
"It would help dramatize our
ability to cooperate and to put
on a good show. These benefits
far outweigh any monetary gains
that Michigan might make"
Swinyard and research asso-
ciate James N. Vedder spent
nearly a month of their spare
time to complete the study at the
suggestion of the State Fair
Authority.
Before coming up with their
total estimate of $146 million,
they consulted the Detroit Olym-
pic Committee, Detroit C I t y
Planning Commission, Convention
B u r e a u, Housing Commission,
Mayor's Commitee for Industrial
and Commercial Development,
Michigan State Fair Authority and
Wayne State University.
Set Up Model Olympics
"Essentially, what we did was
to set up a model Olympic Games
to estimate the expenditures,"
Swinyard explained.
But although the two research-
ers took into consideration con-
sumption expenditures, capital ex-
penditures and derived expendi-
tures, Swinyard emphasized, "You
just can't talk in terms of profit
to the state and cost to the peo-
ple. It's true that some stage
agency will incur a debt of $25,
million for the proposed stadium,
but this will presumably be repaid
over a period of 30 to 40 years,
"The state isn't really raising
taxes to construct it. They're Just
underwriting the cost through
the parimutuel betting funds
which the state takes in. Eventual-
ly the stadium will be paid for by
the people who use it, underwrit-
ten by the onesuwho bet on the
horses."
Swinyard emphasized that plan-
ners are counting on attracting
the Detroit Lion football club and
Detroit Tigers baseball club as

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