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August 30, 1963 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Fl

t

teveal Breakthrough in Blast Detection

guish them from natural phenom- ground blasts is "probably the
ena. fruits of three years of research"
Better Technique by the IST team.
A more sophisticated technique The work carried on by IST isj
consists of utilizing electronic ap- part of the Vela Uniform Project
paratus which changes seismic of the Defense, Department's Ad-
waves into audible sound waves so vanced Research Projects Agency.
that a monitor can tell them apart It is sponsored through 1964 and is
by their distinguishing character- under the aegis of the Office of
istics. Scientific Research and the Cam-
Prof. Wilson noted that the re- bridge Research Laboratories, two
ported confidence of this country research facilities of the Air Force
that it can readily detect under- Office of Aero-Space Research.
Cost of Higher Education
Continues To Increase

Zeisler Hits.
Magazines'
Recruiting
LINCOLN, Neb.-The Associa-
tion for Education in Journalism's
Magazine Council at a recent
meeting this week found much
room for improvement in the mag-
azine industry's present recruit-
ment and training programs.
Prof. Karl F. Zeisler of the
journalism department, the coun-
cil's chairman, delivered the find-
ings in a report to the Association's
annual convention.-

Research expenditures play a
large part in college and univer-
sity costs. Schools now spend ap-
proximately 19 per cent of the
current fund expenditures on or-
ganized research, the study show-
ed. This is an increase of 30 per
cent over 1959-60.
Another report indicates that
the student-staff ratio at the na-
tion's colleges will increase from
the average 12-1 ratio for 1959-60
to 14-1 by 1969-70. These figures
are predicted on a total degree
enrollment of about seven million
students by fall 1970.
The growth in numbers of full-
time instructors in all areas of
study will increase annually by
only 14,000 during the next decade,
compared with an average annual
growth of about 10,000 for the past
five years.

KALEIDOSCOPE:
Summer's News in Review

11

PROF. KARL ZEISLER
... the grubbier guilds

(Continued from Page 1)
aid in maintenance of the judiciary
system and, together with Joint
Judic, will advise the vice-presi-
dent for student a'ffairs on changes
in rules and regulations. It will be
composed of three faculty members
and two students appointed by the
University President.
MSU Causes Frowns
Michigan State University's an-
nouncement that it will have 190
merit scholarship finalists in its
freshmen class caused some un-
easiness at the University over the
summer.
Vice-President for Academic Af-
fairs Roger W. Heyns prepared a
report comparing merit scholar-
ship records of the two institu-
tions. One finding showed MSU
was making great efforts to change
its image. MSU's "merit rate" in-
creased from 33 last year to this
year's 190.
The OSA is preparing a re-
evaluation of structural changes
made last year, which will be com-
pleted shortly. It will also cover
virtually all areas of interest to
the OSA such as the Union-League
merger and parts of the Reed Re-
port.
Tribune Survey
According to a Chicago Tribune
survey of federal education spend-
ing, the University ranked fourth
in a small group of major univer-
sities that receive most govern-
ment research funds.
Wegman Talks
On Health Bill
In Washington
(Continued from Page 1)
facilities in the school of public
health must occupy a lower prior-
ity in the immediate future."
He reasoned that the federal
government should support the
training of public health personnel
at both state and private institu-
tions because they are being edu-
cated for public service in state,
local, national and international
organizations.
The construction bill as it was
passed by the riouse would author-
ize grants totaliing $175 million
over three years. Not more than
$25 million would he available the
first year and $75; million would
be available each of the next two
years. The measure is basicaly the
same as that originally recom-
mended by President John F. Ken-
nedy-however the duration of the
grants was cut from 10 years to
three years.
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It received more than $31 mil-
lion from the government last year
out of a total of $1.6 billion for re-
search.
The Institute of Science and
Technology received nearly a $5
million contract to build and oper-
ate ankinfrared observatory on Mt.
Haleakala in Hawaii-
'U' Misses Contract
The University failed to receive
a hoped for $50 million contract
from the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration space elec-
tronics center.
NASA is currently sponsoring $4
million at the University and is
getting a $1.75 million building on
North Campus to house its work.
Under a new system begun this
year, the University reluctantly
submitted to the State Comp-
troller's office its "initial request"
for funds to continue the same

r .i.

level of existing services for 1964-
65.
'Requests' $41 Million
It sent in a request for $41
million with an expected other in-
come of $13 million from student
fees and nearly $1 million from
miscellaneous sources. The Uni-
versity does not really want the
"initial request" which represents
a bare minimum for its needs.
The $41 million does not in-
clude the cost of year round oper-
ation. In its budget submitted last
year, the University requested $44.2
million and received $38.2.
A two-point grade point average
may no longer be entirely suf-
ficient to re-register. For the last
year and a half the Administrative
Board has been reviewing student
records when over-all and semes-
ter average has fallen below a two
point.

The stu y
more science
needed than
fields.

also predicted that
instructors will be
teachers in other

Birth Control
Said To Have,
Large Backing
A wealthy manufacturer with a
strong interest in birth control told
a meeting of the Planned Parent-
hood Clinic here earlier this week
that 85 per cent of the people in
the world today are in favor of
some form of population control.
Joseph Sunnen, president of a
St. Louis automotive parts com-
pany, has sponsored development
of a medically accepted non-pre-
scriptive drug useful in such con-
trol. He annually distributes thou-
sands of free units of the drug.
Sunnen said the major problem
in birth control work is going out
in the field to reach people who,
because of economic conditions,
cannot come to ask for help. Many
women interested in family plan-
ning, he pointed out, may already
have a large number of children
and may therefore /be unable to
attend educational clinics.
He cited Puerto Rico as one
area where, after a program of
household visits by trained nurses,
a 64 per cent decrease in pregnan-
cies was observed.

"Such recruitment and initial
employment practices as prevail in
much of the magazine industry
strikes this council as a calculated
back-of-the-hand -to journalism
education," Prof. Zeisler wrote.
The council expressed concern
over future opportunities for mag-
azine journalists, and warned the
industry that it might find itself
"guessing where future George
Horace Lormiers, Henry Luces,
and Frank Crowninshields will
emerge from the baseboards."
Some of the practices the Coun-
cil's report "deplores" included
"... the all-too-frequent practice
among magazines to require fe-
male journalism graduates to
equip themselves with shorthand
and indenture themselves as 'Girl
Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays'
as a prelude to legitimate employ-
ment on editorial staffs" and the
male graduates' demeaning status
as "a medieval craft apprentice in
one of the grubbier' guilds."
In a more positive statement the
Council reported a successful first
year in its summer internship pro-
gram with the industry, and noted
that this program has done much
to bring the magazine field and
the journalism schools closer to-
gether.
"The response, in this instance,
was greater from the industry
than from the progession, which
at least is a switch. The council
hopes other industry groups will
join the internship program," the
report said.

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