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December 07, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

10 x**AlR sin GYM!

AG T

Es

/,'

Soviets Propose
Peace with China
Pravda Calls for End of Wrangling
Over 'True Path of Communism'
MOSCOW ()---The Soviet Unionf appealed yesterday to the
Red Chinese to put an end to the public wrankling that has turned
the old Communist'alliance sour,
The bitter quarrel over Chinese and Soviet attitudes to Com-
munism's true' path "has gone too far and in many instances 'has
overstepped the standards of relations between fraternal parties,"
declared Pravda. The Soviet Communist organ held out its olive

National Church Council
Attacks Discrimination

IN CABINET, EMBASSY POSTS:
Will Johnson Ask Changes in Command?

)

NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV
... let's be friends

" branch with renewed proposals to
halt open propaganda warfare and
meet privately to prepare the
ground for a world conference of
Communist parties.-
But the voice of Soviet Com-
munism indicated clearly that in
recent months the two parties
have made no progress toward
agreeing on a continuation of the
Soviet-Chinese party talks which
began here last July and ended in
failure.
Pravda pledged,. however, that
the Soviet Union . would continue
to work for settlement of the dis-
pute-and would wait for time and
history to prove the rightness of
its own views.
"Differences over the tactics of
the party-that is, its ,political
conduct--often are exhausted by
the actual transition of those who
think incorrectly to the correct
path of struggle under the pres-
sure of the course of events them-"
selves," Pravda said.
In seeking an end to the public
slanging match, Pravda set a first
example: it did not mention the
Chinese by name.
Simpson Cites
'Un just' Attack
On Right Wing
WASHINGTON (MP)-Sen. Mil-
ward L. Simpson (R-Wyo) charg-
ed yesterda'y that "rightists and
conservatives" are being blamed
for President John F. Kennedy's
assassination by "people who hope
to gain political advantage from
warping the uncontestable truth."
"After nearly two weeks of na-
tional remonstration," Simpson
said, "it seems quite clear why
the assault is continuing."
He also decried efforts to blame
all Dallas for the slaying, saying.
the city "has no reason to don,
a mantle of guilt because some
groups which have aligned them-
selves with extremist causes are
As the Wyoming Republican
spoke to the Senate, the House.
Republican policy committee also
denounced "efforts to make Amer-
icans gefnerally feel guilty." The
committee of 36 declared.
"Rather than setting American
against American, as easily could
happen if guilt is misplaced and
doubt becomes a device of political
debate, the tragic event should
serve to set the face and heart of
all Americans firmly against the
warped and alien doctrine ... of
Communism.""
The committee said the grief
shared by all Americans should
not be expected to produce "una-
nimity on all of the legislative
proposals put forward by our late
President."

PHILADELPHIA (P)-The Na-
tional Council of Churches yester-
day launched a broad attack on
every kind of racial, religious and
economicdiscrimination.
Its 40 million members were
urged to give wholehearted sup-
port in a crusade for justice.
In a lengthy resolution, passed
overwhelmingly after two hours of
debate and amendments, delegates
called upon the 31 church denom-
inations comprising the council "to
be willing to pay whatever price
of unpopularity or sacrifice these
acts (for racial justice) may en-
tail."
Churches, Unite!
The delegates demanded that
churches unite in support of fed-
eral, state and local laws that
guarantee, without racial or re-
ligious discrimination:
-The right to vote and equal
protection of the law;
-Equal Access to education;
-Equal opportunity for jobs,
union membership and promotion;
-The right to rent or buy and
occupy housing everywhere, and
-Access to all public accommo-
dations.
The resolution also called on all
churches to open membership and
places of worship "without regard
to race or color" and to permit all
qualified ministers equal access to
their pulpits.
It suggested, too, an interchange
of white and Negro members be-
tween congregations on grounds
"that racial pluralism enriches the
experience of the Christian com-
munity."
Discrimination Condemnation
In two. companion actions, the
delegates unanimously adopted a
so-called "message to the church-
es" and a "pronouncement on hu-
man rights" that broadened the
council's condemnation of dis-
crimination anywhere it may be
found.
The message called on churches
to 1) "work within our society to
see that we adopt our economic
patterns to provide as a right an
opportunity for all of our citizens
to earn an adequate livelihood,"
and 2) "help men find a sense of
vocation in their daily work, re-
deem leisure hours to creative use,
undergird the family, preserve the
identity and dignity of persons in
a technological society."
On human rights it urged "re-
newed dedication of our citizens
and our government to the mani-
fold concerns for human rights
within our own country, and in the
growing world community and
thus to larger measures of jus-
tice and freedom for more peace
-on earth."
, Fast Fast Action
As a positive gesture on its feel-
ing on civil rights, a group of dele-
gates went to Washington, where
they buttonholed congressmen to
urge quick action on a civil rights

bill now bottled up in the House
Rules Committee.
The council had suggested use
of a discharge petition to free the
bill from the committee, if it is
necessary.
Filibustering
Threat Stops
New Rules
IWASHINGTON (P-A new fight
which flared up over Senate rules
-with civil rights implications
back of it--subsided yesterday in
a temporary truce which may last
into January.
The scrap had threatened for a'
time Thursday to complicate plans
to wind up the 1963 Congress ses-
sion by Dec. 20. Southern senators
Ihad raised filibuster signals.
Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa),
an advocate of what he calls
"strong" civil rights. legislation
and a man who had helped to
engineer the fight, waved it to an
apparent end in a Senate speech.
No Filibusters, Please
Clark said he had been persuad-
ed that "it would not be in the
public interest" to get involved in
a filibuster that might hold up
the passage of bills the Senate
leadership wants passed.
He sparked absolutely no en-
thusiasm with a suggestion that
the Senate remain in session "all
night and all day tomorrow" to
test out whether the southerners
really were determined to wage a
filibuster fight.
The senator finally agreed to a
procedure for a more or less pain-
less means of shelving the whole
issue. Majority Leader Mike Mans-
field (D-Mont) obtained unani-
mous consent to adjourn the Sen-
ate until Monday instead of re-
cessing.
Key Resolution
Under Senate rules, the ad-
journment automatically washes
out the motion to lay before the
Senate a resolution which would
have been the centerpiece of the
rules row.
,The resolution itself was non-
controversial. It would create a
special Senate-House committee to
recommend improvements in the
organization . and operations of
both chambers, but not to dis-
cuss their rules. Clark-who wants
rules changes, including some
which would make it easier to
choke off filibusters-had disclos-
ed he would move to empower the
committee to study the two
chambers' rules. This promptly
set off the southern senators' plans
to fight it.

By LEWIS HAWKINS
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - When a new
man becomes the head of a big
business enterprise, he frequently
announces his subordinate exec-
utives will remain at their posts.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
has done roughly the same thing
in taking over as head of the gov-
ernment,'
But the corporation president,
after ,a time, usually make- some.
or many changes in command as
he familiarizes himself with the
job. Johnson may be expected to
do the same thing. Historically,
Vice-Presidents taking office as
Presidents have, in due course,
changed cabinet membership sub-
stantially.
Cabinet To Stay
Specifically, the tall Texan
thrust suddenly into the Presiden-
cy by the assassination Nov. 22 of
President John F. Kennedy has
said Kennedy's cabinet members
will remain at their posts.
Pierre Salinger, press secretary
to Kennedy, has told newsmen
that in his first session with the
cabinet the new chief executive
asked all members to stay on the
job. Salinger said Johnson told the
10 men "he needed their help in
the time ahead."
Similarly, Johnson has asked
the nation's ambassadors around
the world not to submit the pro
forma resignations that custom-
arily follow a change in the Pres-
idency.
No Housecleaning
The new President has said
nothing as yet about the heads of
the big executives agencies and
other top posts over which he
holds control. But he certainly has
not hinted at any general house-
cleaning such as usually follows a
shift of power from one party toe1
another.
The cabinet is peculiarly the
special and more or less private
instrument of a President. Its
members must not only subscribe
to basic administration policies
but must be able to function in
harmony with the chief executive
if they are to be effective.
Obviously, it is too early for
Johnson to have applied any such
practical test to his relations, as
chief executive, with men who
make up the cabinet.
The cabinet jobs that are tops
in prestige and power are held by
Secretary of State Dean Rusk,
Secretary of the Treasury Douglas

Dillon, Secretary of Defense Rob-
ert McNamara and Attorney Gen-
eral Robert F. Kennedy, the late
President's brother and all-around
right-hand man.
Nothing on the public record
shows friction between Johnson
and any of these four, and John-
son has even referred to McNa-
mara as the strongest member of
the Kennedy cabinet.
Some observers, feel that, as
Vice-President, Johnson -did not
always see eye to eye with Attor-
ney General Kennedy. Because of
these reports and because of Re-
publican criticisms of what they
call the "Kennedy dynasty", spec-
ulation about a change may cen-
ter on that job.
Committed to Objectives
But regardless of whether there
is cleavage between Johnson and
Robert Kennedy, Johnson is com-
mitted strongly to the late Presi-
dent's policies and objectives, es-
pecially in the field of civil rights
which is the special domain of the
Justice Department.
In addition, as a prospective
candidate for election on his own
in 1964, Johnson might be reluc-
tant to sever a symbolic link with
his predecessor's administration-
although it is obvious that Robert
Kennedy could not expect to exert
the same over-all influence that
he did as the devoted brother of
the late President.
Robert Kennedy has given no

hint of whether he wants to serve
under Johnson.
Another member of the so-
called dynasty is Sargent Shriver,
husband of Eunice Kennedy and
director of the Peace Corps. There
is nothing to indicate Johnson
wants to be rid of Shriver. But if
he did, as a practical politician, he
would have to weigh carefully the
recognized popularity with Con-
gress of both the Corps and its.
director.
The only other member of the
family holding high office at pres-

1111 rI

a

MONDAY, Dec. 9 at 4:10 p.m.

JOHN ROY CARLSON,
Author, Lecturer, "Historian of the Present"
Speaks under H I LLEL'S auspices
On
"HATE FRONTSR
AROUND THE WORLD"

Michigan Union, Rooms R and S

Everyone Welcome

_...

ent is the late President's youngest
brother, Edward (Ted) Kennedy;
but asa Democratic Senator from
Massachusetts, this Kennedy's
political future lies more with state
voters than with the President.
Another Kennedy brother-in-
law, Stephen Smith, is in public
work only peripherally now as a
part-time troubleshooter for the
Democratic National Committee.
As party chief, Johnson would be
in a position to say whether he
wants Smith to retain this role,
assuming Smith wishes to.

Courses got you down?
Need help for those finals ?
Come to the
TUTORING SERVICE
offered by the Michigan Union
Stop in
STUDENT OFF ICES OF THE UNION
2nd floor
Tues.-Thurs. 3-5

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/.'.

L27QZ;

t

K

.{

Join the Daily business staff

MAO TSE-TUNG
... says Pravda
Firm Denied
Export Permit
For Rockets
BONN ()--The government an-
nounced last night it will deny ex-
port licenses to a new West Ger-
man firm which wants to sell
military rockets abroad, particu-
larly in the developing countries.
The government statement said
no permits have been issued for
manufacturing, purchase or sale
of rockets by the Hamburg Weap-
ons and Aviation Armament Corp.-
The statement recalled that,
Bonn had renounced production of
military rockets when it became
a member of the North Atlantic
Alliance under the 1954 Paris trea-
ties.

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Christmas Cards
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PORT AU PRINCE-The Hait-
ian cabinet of President Francois
Duvalier resigned yesterday, au-
thoritative sources reported.
* * *
SANTIAGO, Dominican Repub-
lic -- Military authorities an-
nounced the capture yesterday of
Jose Miguel Roman, a leader of
Castroite guerrillas who have har-
assed the government since Sun-
day. He was captured about two
miles from Santiago. He had been
reported holed up with other
rebels 25 miles from Santiago.
* * *
BEIRUT-The Baath Socialist
Socialist Party, an Arab unity
movement that rules Syria, and
shares in the government of Iraq,
has been banned in Lebanon as a
threat to Lebanese security.
** *
TMATA, South Africa - Chief
Kaizer Matanzainm& yesterday be-
came prime minister of the Tran-
skei, South Africa's first Bantus-

; I

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CIHARkM

tan or all-African state. Matan-
zima scored a narrow victory-54-
49-over paramount chief Victor
Poto, a multiracialist and critic of
the South African government's
policies.
* * *
CLEVELAND-Republican Rob-
ert Taft Jr., declaring himself a
candidate for the Senate yester-
day, said a national GOP ticket
headed by Sen. Barry Goldwater
(R-Ariz) "would make it difficult"
for his senatorial campaign in
Ohio. Taft, 46, will seek the Sen-
ate seat now held by Sen. Stephen
M. Young (D-Ohio). The 73-year-
old Young is expected to announce
soon that he will seek re-election.
*' * *
NEW ORLEANS-Purged of its
initial fury by the assassination
of President John F. Kennedy,
Louisiana's campaign for governor
goes to the voters today. Ten men
are bidding for Democratic nom-
ination. If no one draws over 50
per cent of the vote, the two top
men compete in a runoff election
Jan. 11.
UNITED NATIONS - The 56
United Nations members from Af-
rica and Asia proposed formally
last night that the General As-
sembly enlarge its 21-nation steer-
ing committee by adding three
assembly vice-presidents from Af-
rica and Asia. Diplomatic sources
said they handed in a resolution
to that effect after signing a
sponsors' list at a private meeting
of thet Asian-African bloc.
ALGIERS-Col. Mohand Ou El
Hadj, miiltary leader of the Berber
reebl uprising in October, will be
named minister of veterans affairs
in the Algerian government, gov-
ernment sources repoeted last
night. The official announcement
is expected within the next few
days.
** *
NEW YORK-The stock market
slipped moderately yesterday from
the all-time high recorded on
Thursday in a day of active trad-
ing. The Dow Jones average show-
ed 30 industrials down 3.61, 20
rails up .64, 15 utilities down .36
,an AR ctnlr . Ann v. f

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Comrunion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For Transportation Call 2-2756
9:30 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from
2 to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m. Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
of 6 years of age.
For transportation call NO 8-7048.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Adult Instruction Class and Adult Bible Class-
9:45 a.m.
Church School-9:35 a.m.
8:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Mornina Worship.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. Services, with
Universal Bible Sunday sermon by the Rev.
Alfred Scheips, "Wholesome Words In-
deed!"
Sunday at 11:15 a.m. Bible Class.
Sunday at 5:00 p.m. Gamma Delta chapters
gather for fellowship after attending "The
Messiah," with supper at six.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. Midweek Advent
Vespers, with sermon by Vicar John Koe-
nig (Holy Communion).
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
7:00 p.m. Student Meeting.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. Vespers.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 and 512 E. Huron-663-9376
Rev. James H. Middleton-Senior Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light-Campus Minister
Mr. David Backus-Student Intern
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. Christianity and American Culture
as Seen Through Science. Speaker, Dr. Wil-
liam Kerr.
MONDAY, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Luncheon.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School & Services - 9:30 a.m. and
11:00 a.m.
Sermon-"John Brown: A Study in Sanity."
U-M Student Group, 7:30 p.m. Dr. John Pol-
lard of the Mental Health Research In-
stitute will speak on Hallucinogens and
LSD 25.
Sunday Evening Forum, 8:00 p.m. Miss Eliza-
beth Weil wil speak on the Dance Theater.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.
"New Horizons Are Seen"-Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Methodist So-
cial Creed, Capital Punishment, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program-Reading
of Christmas Pla;. Wesley Lounge.
Y MONUAY
7:00-8:00 p.m.-Cell Group No. 1, Gene
Ransom's office.
TUESDAY
8:30-11:00 p.m.--Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast, Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6.:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, dinner and pro-
gram, Pine Room.
THURSDAY
4:15-5:15 p.m.-Cell Group No. 2, Gene
; Ransom's office.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 am. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild.
9:30 a.m. German Worship Service in Chapel.
(First and third Sundays)
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Musical Services, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. "The
Christmas Story," by P'eter Mennin.
Bible Lecture & Discussion, 10:30 a.m., Dr.
Preston Slosson.
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
5189.

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PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M.-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894

1F

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