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November 22, 1963 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-22

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:TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22. 1963

TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRTDAV WfliTRMflF~R. 9i~ 1042

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LISTS SIX POINTS:
DAC Enumerates Demands for 'U' Officials

Chances of Added Tuition Hikes Dim

(Continued from Page 1)
The letter was signed by DAC
Chairman Charles Thomas, Vice-
Chairman Davi Barnard, Mrs. L.
Meyers, Lewis Meyers and Peter
Signorelli, '64. The five act as
DAC's executive board. Meyers is
a teaching fellow in the English
department. Mrs. Meyers, Bar-
nard and Thomas are not con-
nected with the University.
"The Direct Action Committee
hereby serves notice upon you,"
the letter concluded, "that failure
to accept and act upon these de-
mands within the time limits stip-
ulated above will result in a sec-
ond picket of the Administration
Bldg. This projected picket line
will shut the, building for the
hours prescribed by DAC for the
demonstration.
"All efforts to enter the build-
ing, whether by employes, unalign-
ed civilians, University officials or
police, will be forcibly opposed."
Speaking for DAC, Meyers ex-
plained last night that the time
limits attached to the demands
"would have gone into effect on
the date the University agreed to
them. It is obvious that there will
be no agreement, so they no long-
er apply."
Picket Soon
Meyers said the picket would be
held before the end of the year
but refused to give an exact date.
He said it may not come before
the end of the semester. Classes
end on Dec. 14, while final exams
end one week later. The Admin-
istration Bldg., however, remains
open after students leave campus.

Meyers called the University's
release of the DAC letter "a fair-
ly underhanded action. We want-
ed to negotiate, but this has cer-
tainly undermined the negotia-
tions." He added that University
Personnel Officer Charles All-
mand, to whom the letter was
delivered, had promised the group
a personal reply by mail. Allmand
denied that any promises were
made.
Meyers said he has given All-
mand specific cases of discrimina-
tory hiring. "We haven't run any
test cases ourselves, but we have a
list of qualified Negroes who have
been rejected for jobs by the Uni-
versity.
Pierpont Replies
Disputing this charge, Pierpont
added in his statement that the
University "has a comprehensive
program in its employment poli-
cies and procedures to be sure as
is humanly possible that all quali-
fied members of minority groups
who apply for available positions
are employed and given every op-
portunity to advance in their dut-
ies and responsibilities.
"The University simply does not
discriminate in its hiring prac-
tices," he said.
The vice-president used the
same language two days ago when,
speaking for the Regents, he re-
jected a proposal from Student
Government Council's Human Re-
lations Board that the University
study its employment structure to
seek out and eliminate "barriers
to the employment of minority
group members."

HRB Chairman David Aroner,
'64, expressed dissatisfaction with
Pierpont's view at the time, and
challenged the University to pub-
lish a department by department
breakdown of Negro employment.
Such a study would "prove em-
barrassing," Aroner claimed.
He declared last night, however,
that he was equally opposed to
DAC's methods. "I question
whether they have gone through
all the available channels, to what
extent they have discussed their
demands with the University,"
Aroner said. "They haven't pre-
sented any facts," he added.
"I've never felt able to say that
t h e University discriminates,"
Aroner said. "The University has
a definite non - discrimination
policy, and I think most people at
the top are doing their best to
enforce it. There are probably in-
dividual cases of discrimination
at lower levels, but individual
bigots will eventually be found out
and fired.
Bigger Concern
"I'm more concerned with struc-
tural procedures-promotion and
recruitment, for instance-which
have been built in over the years.
These procedures were certainly
not designed to discriminate -
but they work, in effect, against
minority groups."
Aroner said the problem is one
which demands expert study. "No
laymen can pinpoint these prob-
lems. They require sociological
study."

The following is the coplete text of a letter presented to
the University on Tuesday by the Direct Action Committee.
LIST OF DEMANDS:
1. Preferential hiring. (one week)
2. Termination of the practice of testing applicants for jobs
in such a way that skills which are irrelevant to the particular
opening are called for;. an end to the practice of giving aptitude
tests that function to guarantee middle-class employes only
for office jobs. (one month)
3. Dismissal of racists, bigots, those who reject qualified
applicants for jobs on the sole basis of their race, color, creed,
nationality or political affiliation. (one week after fact is
established)
4. Official notification to be received by DAC of openings,
until an agreed upon number of Negroes are given preferential
hiring. (one week)
5. After this number is reached, all such openings to be
announced through regular channels: no hiring by word of
mouth unless it can be shown that all formal efforts to fill a
position have failed.
6. All personnel responsible for hiring to be officially noti-
fied of these changes and modifications in employment policy.
(immediately)
The Direct Action Committee hereby serves notice upon
you that failure to accept and act upon these demands within
the time limits stipulated above will result in a second picket
of the Administration Bldg. This projected picket line will
shut the building for the hours prescribed by DAC for the
demonstration. All efforts to enter the building, whether by
employes, unaligned civilians, University officials or police, will
forcibly opposed.
Signed:
Charles Thomas
DAC Chairman
David Barnard
DAC Vice-Chairman
Mrs. L. Meyers
Lewis Meyers
Peter Signorelli

(Continued from Page 1)
enrollment pressures and rising
operational costs.
Schools 'Resigned'
The 10 schools have requested
a $33.8 million increase, "but they
are already resigned to the fact
that these appropriation requests
will be well-trimmed," Orlebeke
indicated.
He is one of series of adminis-
trative budget officials currently
examining the individual approp-
riation requests. The budget hear-
ing for the University will be held
next Tuesday.
The Legislature issues the total
higher education appropriation in
one bill, but divides each institu-
tion's allotment within the bill.
Need More Money
Romney is well-aware that this
year's legislative operating ap-
propriation of $110 million-only
$6 million more than last year-
could not be repeated again, the
aides noted.
Inflation and enrollment in-
creases alone would require a
minimum $9-$10 million boost to
match the effects of this year's

$6 million raise. Van Dusen ex-
plained.
If salary raises are to be in-
cluded, an extra several million
will be needed.
$12 Million Enough
A $12 million increase overall
for higher education would supply
the University with sufficient
funds to preclude a tuition hike,
Regent Allan Sorenson of Midland
estimated at the Regents meeting
last Friday.
The $12 million tentative in-
crease is considered by the aides
as a basic minimum considering
the predicted revenues for the
1964-65 fiscal year of $600 million
and a $25 million surplus in rev-
enue this year.
The Romney administration will
tend to be conservative in creat-
ing revenue projections on which
to determine the appropriation
recommendation, Orlebeke em-
phasized.
This caution is spurred by the
new constitution's provision that
appropriation promises may have
to be cut back in the actual
spending in order to achieve a
balanced budget.

I

*

CHARLES ORLEBEKE
... may oppose hike

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