100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, YC63

Conley Stands Out on 'M' Defense

SPORTS SHORTS:

By BILL BULLARD
"Maybe I'm prejudiced but I
don't think there's a better de-
fensive end in the Big Ten than
Jim Conley," Michigan end coach
Jocko Nelson stated.
The Wolverine starting left end
has drawn praise from the Michi-
gan staff and opposing coaches as
well in the last two seasons. The
rangy 6'3" junior from Spring-
dale, Pennsylvania stepped into
the starting assignment as a soph-
omore a year ago when ineligibili-
ities and graduations left the end
ranks depleted.

JIM CONLEY
... defensive demon

But the inexperienced sopho-
more end soon proved his worth.
By the end of the season he had
racked up 228 minutes of playing
time, more than any other wing-
man on the squad.
Real Confident
"I felt real confident at the
start of this season after getting
so much experience last season,"
Conley said. "I sort of knew what
to expect. I knew what kinds of
teams we were to play and knew
that they hit hard."
Nelson pointed out that Conley
has had a great deal of experience
on both offense and defense. Us-
ually playing a tight end when
Michigan's offensive plans call
for the ends to be primarily block-
ers, Conley has done a good job
Nelson says.
Actually as a pass receiver, Con-
ley has already surpassed his last
season's totals even though he
hasn't been playing as much of-
fense. He has caught six passes
for 114 yards and one touchdown
so far compared with five recep-
tions for 47 yards last season.
Go Both Ways
"I'd rather go both ways and
play both offense and defense,"
Conley says. "I enjoy playing all
the time. But if the coaches feel
that I'm most helpful on defense
that's where I'll play. But I've got
the strength to go all the way
anytime they want me to."
Conley believes that it's im-
portant for him to stay in top

shape.sDuring the summer he runs
at least a mile a day four or five
times a week to prepare for fall
practice.
"I just try and get my legs in
condition. If they're in shape then
the rest of my body will develop
into shape also," he says.
Conley currently weighs about
195 pounds which is 10 pounds
heavier than his playing weight as
a senior in high school. "I've al-
ways thought that I'd like to weigh
10 or 15 pounds heavier but I've
never let it bother me," he says.
"I weighed in at 204 pounds at
the start of fall practice but I've
lost some since then."
'Built Wiry'
Nelson commented that Conley
was "built wiry" and was a tough
football player. He said Conley's
build and aggressiveness made him
a match for his Big Ten oppon-
ents.
The Northwestern and Illinois
games were Conley's best this sea-
son according to Nelson. "But he's
played real steady all year long,"
Nelson added. "His overall play has
been good.
"Jim is just a good all-around
football player. He's a solid player
and he always gives you 100 per
cent effort all the time."
Conley, like all the other Wol-
verines, is looking forward to the
Ohio State contest this Saturday.
"The problem is not so much with
Ohio State's speed," he said. "If
Bill Laskey (defensive right end)
and I can contain the end sweeps,
I'm sure the middle of our line
will hold solid.
"The Ohio State line is not as
strong as it has been the past
two years. But it's still tough.
"I think the big thing is for all
our guys to take up a personal
challenge to just go out there and
knock the hell out of them. Ohio
State this season is not the Ohio
State of old. But the only way to
beat them is to hit them hard."
TCimberlake
Named Best
In Midwest
Bob Timberlake, Michigan's
first string quarterback, has been
named "Midwest Back of the
Week" by United Press Interna-
tional for hishoutstanding per-
formance in the 21-21 tie with
Iowa last Saturday.
In the game against the Hawk-
eyes, he gained a total of 230
yards, 93 passing and 137 running.
His rushing yardage is the most
gained by any Wolverine back in
a single game since Jim Pace
raced for 164 yards against Ohio
State in 1957.
The play that shook the Iowa
defense most was a delayed sneak
run by Timberlake for good yard-
age. He also gained ground by
running on pass plays when his
receivers were covered.
Coaches Impressed
Both Bump Elliott and Hawkeye
Coach Jerry Burns were impress-
ed by Timberlake's performance.
"We really didn't expect to see
him run that much," said Burps.
"He looked smarter and faster and
I think he's quicker than Ron Di-
Gravio (Purdue's quarterback) ."
For the season, Timberlake has
netted 162 yards in 78 carries for
a 2.08 average despite being caught
for losses when his pass receivers
were covered. In the passing de-
partment he has completed 42
of 85 passes for 588 yards and
three touchdowns. He is in third
place in scoring for the Wolver-
ines with 23 points on two touch-
downs and 11 extra points.
JEWISH BOOK
j FAIR K

at!
WA H R'S
in co-operation with Hillel
N OV. 18-27

By The Associated Press
HOUSTON-Texas, a state pro-
ducing about 10,000 Negro high
school football players and some
3,500 basketball players, now is
going to see more of them staying
at home for their collegiate com-
petition.
The University of Texas of the,
Southwest Conference has inte-i
grated its sports and will start re-
cruiting the Negro athletes. South-
ern Methodist announced that Ne-
groes could be used on its team
and University of Houston, an in-
dependent, said qualified Negro
athletes would be sought.
The integration of Southwest
Conference athletics came about
rather quietly.
It all began when Darrell Roy-
al, University of Texas athletic
director and coach of the nation's
No. 1 football team, held his reg-
ular Monday get-together with
sports writers and said:
"The Athletic Council met with
the administration this morning
and we decided that any student
who meets academic and athletic
requirements is eligible to try out
for any sports at this moment."
That statement broke the ice.
Now most of the seven other mem-
bers of the Southwest Conference
can be expected to follow suit.
For years, teams from the Big
Ten, Big Eight, Big Six, and other
conferences raided the state of its
Negro football stars. Or the ath-
letes went to all-Negro colleges in
the state, such as Prairie View
A & M and Texas Southern.
Several years ago the barriers
against Negro participation in
sports at Texas colleges started
falling as integration of the
schools spread.
North Texas State University,
the fourth largest college in the
state with 10,000 students and a
member of the Missouri Valley
Conference, has opened athletics
to .. egroes. A number of small
colleges in the state, including
several in the Lone Star Confer-
ence, have had Negro athletes for
several years.
Overlook AAU Rebuff
HAMILTON, N.Y.-The United
States Baseball Federation said
yesterday it wouldtbe a good sport
for the sake of the. 1964 Olym-
pics and. overlook for the pres-
ent an AAU rebuff to its bid to

represent the United States on an
international body.
But the Federation said it would
renew its fight in 1965, thereby
promising ' an intensified chal-
lenge to the dominance of the
Amateur Athletic Union. The AAU
has been the sole sanctioning
agent for U.S. entrants in inter-
national competition, although it
does not represent baseball.
In the meantime, Everett D.
Barnes, Federation president, said
his group would cooperate with
the U.S. Olympic Committee to
complete arrangements the fed-
eration had begun for baseball ex-
hibition games in Tokyo next
year.
"There is too much at stake,"
Barnes said, "to allow this delib-
erate and purely political setback
to prevent America's baseball
players from taking part in the
1964 Olympics."
Looking for a
Good Haircut
try the
U-M BARBERS
5 BARBERS
NO WAITING
N. Univ. near Kresge's

due December 3,

1963, at 5:00.

Texas Schools Decide
To IntegrateAthletics

-Daily-Jim Lines
CONLEY CHARGES-Michigan first string left end, Jim Conley
(82) fakes out an unidentified Hawkeye lineman and prepares to
rush fullback Lonnie Rogers (44) in Michigan's 21-21 tie with
Iowa last Saturday. Conley has been a standout on defense all
season.
GRIDSELECTIONS
Are you always the goat and never the hero?
Do your friends push, shove andrkick you around? When you
go to the beach, do bullies come around and kick sand in your
face? If you want to change all of this and are afraid of going to
Charles Atlas for help here is an answer for you:
The Daily's Grid Picks contest is guaranteed to make a new
man out of you. You would be amazed if you saw the changes in
the 95-pound weaklings who have won the Grid Picks contest.
Winning the contest can change you from the wishy-washy slob
you are to a dynamic Marlboro-type man.
If you would like to take advantage of this wonderful offer,
you must enter the contest now before it is too late. There are
only two more days left before the end of this season's contest.
Simply turn in your selections to The Daily by 9 p.m. Friday.
Sorry, but this fantastic offer is limited to one entry per person.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

-
LAST TWO DAYS!
WOLVERINE CLUB PRESENTS
Student A ir Charters,
to NEW YORK
on*UNITED AIRLINES
"THANKSGIVING VACATION"
Leave Nov. 27 ......................... Return Dec. 1
"CHRISTMAS VACATION"
Fit. No. 1-Leave Dec. 20..................Return Jan. 12
Flt. No. 2-Leave Dec. 21 ........... .... Return Jan. 12
ROUND TRIP . .. 151.5O
Includes Special Buses Between Union & Willow Run and All Taxes
UNITED AIRLINES IS THE NATION'S LARGEST REGULARLY SCHEDULED AIRLINE WITH
AN OUTSTANDING RECORD OF DEPENDABLE PERFORMANCE. THESE DEPARTURES ARE
GUARANTEED, WEATHER PERMITTING. BOOK NOW, AND BE SURE YOU'LL BE HOME
FOR THE HOLIDAYS !
Call Wolverine Club- NO 3-9731

I

PETITIONS are now available for the
SGC MEMBERSHIP
TRIBUNAL
in the SGC offices. Petitions are

1. Ohio St. at Michigan (score)
2. Illinois at Michigan State
3. Wisconsin at Minnesota
4. Purdue at Indiana
5. Notre Dame at Iowa
6. Penn State at Pittsburgh
7. Dartmouth at Princeton
8. Harvard at Yale
9. Oklahoma at Nebraska
10. North Carolina at Duke

11. Florida at Miami (Fla.)
12. S.M.U. at Baylor
13. Rice at T.C.U.
14. Oregon State at Oregon
15. U.C.L.A. at Southern Cal.
16. California at Stanford
17. Washington S. at Washington
18. Utah at Utah State
19. Tennessee at Kentucky
20. Missouri at Kansas

r1

e

I

Pro Standings

U

Chicago
Montreal
Toronto
Detroit
New York
Boston

NHL
W L TPts. GF
12 2 4 28 66
8 5 4 20 53
8 6 2 18 47
6 8 2 14 34
5 111 11 44
3 10 3 9 32

GA
37
47
47
44
53
48

Syracuse

University

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Montreal 3, Toronto 1
New York 1, Boston 1 (tie)
Chicago 5, Detroit 2
NBA
EASTERN DIVISION
W L Pet.
Boston 12 1 .923
Cincinnati 10 8 .556
Philadelphia 6 8 .429
New York 6 12 .333

SEMESTERS ABROAD
ITALY No language requirement
GUATEMALA Spanish prerequisite
FRANCE French prerequisite
SUMMER ABROAD
Home Economics
Special Education
FOR INFORMATION

GB
4z
6%/
8

ACADEMIC

PROGRAMS ABROAD 0 UNIVERSITY
610 E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 13202

COLLEGE

WESTERN DIVISION
W L Pet. GB
St. Louis 10 6 .625 -
Los Angeles 9 7 .563 1
San Francisco 7 7 .500 2
Detroit 5 9 .357 4
Baltimore 3 10 .231 5Y2
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 124, Cincinnati 118
Philadelphia 118, New York 101
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit vs. Cincinnati at Indianapolis.
St. Louis at Los Angeles

OPEN MONDAY NIGHTS 'TILL 8:30

Ann Arbor's Headquarters For:
Basketball Equipment
UN I FORMS-BALLS-GOALS

WHO SAYS THAT THE ONLY
SHOES UNIVERSITY MEN
WEAR ARE SNEAKERS?
We can't dispute their popularity. The mark of distinction
-dirt! However, as experts in traditional university clothing
and furnishings, we know that college men-in addition to
being sneaker-wearers-have definite preferences when select-
ing their shoes. And, we specialize in these preferences. From
our comprehensive collections of University Shop shoes, all
made to our exacting standards, we show the favored wing
tip, 20.00; the saddle, 20.00; the moccasin, 16.50; and, of
course, the sneaker, 9.00.

'9

1

"Converse

All-Star Shoes"

STEIN & GOETZ Sporting Goods
315 So. Main St.-Downtown

SKI

with DICK BARRYMORE
in his color movie

.inmt.mm4

F

THE WHITE SEARCH

f l I

r~W

III

I

F-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan