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November 16, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. N

ichigan Seeks Third Straight Victory

Illinois Attempts Comeback for Title
As Northwestern Tries To Stop OSU

igan grad) before -coming to Ann
Arbor.
Another Trial
The Michigan defense, which
has been strong most of the year,
will face another stern challenge
from the Hawkeyes. While the
Iowans don't possess any hot-shot
The Lineups

IOWA
Webb
Miller
Hilgenberg
Fletcher
Reilly
Kasapis
Giacobazzi
Snook
Rogers
Krause
Grier

Pos.
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

MICH.
Conley
Keating
O'Donnell
Patchen
Hahn
Yearby
Laskey
Timberlake
Clancy
Rindfuss
Anthony

Snook's leading receivers are
Giacobazzi, Krause, and senior
Cloyd Webb, who was particularly
outstanding two years ago when
he was Matt Szykowny's prime
target. Last year, Krause was
listed as a "floater"-he lined up
at tackle and floated into the
backfield to become an eligible
receiver - but now he's a full-
fledged halfback.
Praises Linebackers
Burns calls his pair of guards,
Wally Hilgenberg and Mike Reilly,
"the finest two linebackers on one
team in the Big Ten. There's no
team with two better ones," he
emphasizes. Hilgenberg is the
brother of former Iowa great
Jerry Hilgenberg.
Michigan's starting lineup re-
mains the same as last week at
Illinois. By now things have set-
tled down to the point where
there is a basic first team on of-
fense, and onother one on defense,
inasmuch as the substitution rules
will allow.
The major substitutions on de-
fense lately have been Rowser for

quarterback Bob Timberlake and
linebacker Barry Dehlin for full-
back Mel Anthony in the back-
field, and Jim Conley and Bill
Laskey for John Henderson and
Craig Kirby at the end position,
although Conley does play a con-
siderable amount of offense.
Tackles Yearby and Tom Keat-
ing, guards Joe O'Donnell and
Rich Hahn, center Brian Patchen,
and halfbacks Dick Rindfuss and
Jack Clancy are all two-way
players. Since there are only four
positions which are platooned,
Elliott can get two men in on
fourth down in case of a punt,
and two more in on first down,
alleviating the need for a time-
out.

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Dethroned cham-
pion Wisconsin and Northwestern,
the collapsed pre-season favorites,'
can ruin the Big Ten title hopes
of two other contenders in to-
day's semifinal Conference foot-
ball round.
Wisconsin is host to Illinois,
which has a shade of a champion-
ship chance, and Northwestern in-
vades Ohio State, whose Buck-
eyes must win to overtake also
unbeaten Michigan State in the
stretch drive.
Michigan State, owning a 4-0-1
loop mark and No. 4 spot in the
Associated Press national rank-
ings, marks time with a non-con-

ference joust with Notre Dame at
East Lansing.
Irish Sprint Lags
Notre Dame, with a 2-5 overall
record, has lost three in i row.
Even former coach Frank Leahy
is bewailing what he termed the
lack of spirit among the Irish.
MSU has been getting fat on
Notre Dame in recent year. win-
ning the last seven games and ten
of the last eleven.
That makes Michigan State the
heavy favorite at East Lansing
today in the meeting with the
Irish.
A week from Saturday, Michi-
gan State is home against Illinois
which has a current 4-1-1 Big
Ten record and Ohio State, now
3-0-1, plays at Michigan in the
season-ending round.
In other games, Michigan, 2-2-1
-which last Saturday upset Illi-
nois-entertains Iowa, 2-3; Min-
nesota, 1-4 is at Purdue, 2-3; and
Indiana, 1-4, visits Oregon for a
non-conference tilt.

Illinois, unbeaten in six games
prior to being tripped by Mich-
igan, is a slight underdog against
e r r a t i c Wisconsin, 3-2, who
trounced Illinois 55-7 two years
ago and won last year 35-6. In
the series dating back to 1895,
Wisconsin has won 19, Illinois 15
and there were five ties.
Illinois, playing seven confer-
ence games - compared with six
each for Michigan State and Ohio
State-still can win the undis-
puted crown and a Rose Bowl
trip. But the trick can be turned
only if the Illini whip Wisconsin
and Michigan State and Ohio
State is beaten once.
Michigan State is in the driv-
er's seat. Even if Ohio State can
conquer Northwestern and Mich-
igan, the Spatans-by defeating
Illinois-can get no worse than a
title tie with the Buckeyes. In
that event, Michigan State pre-
sumably would win the Rose Bowl
bid since Ohio State last visited
Pasadena in 1958.

Texas Cotton Hopes Tested;
M1VSU Tacles Notre Dame

quarterbacks or dazzling runners,
both their air and ground games
have shown to be potent on occa-
sion.
The quarterback slot has been
taken over recently by Gary
Snook, who replaced early-season
star Fred Riddle three weeks ago.
Besides being a respectably acu-
rate passer, Snook has demon-
strated his ability to squirm out
when the going gets rough in the
backfield.
Athletic Board
Hardens Stand
On Tender Cut
By TOM WEINBERG
The Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics last night so-
lidified its :tand on the Big Ten's
proposed cut in the number of
athletic tenders at its second
meeting of the year.
The Big Ten proposal would
cut the limit on the number of
tenders from 80 to 70, with a
maximum of 30 a year for football
players and five per year in bas-
ketball. The board favors the cut
to 70, but wants to change the
limit from five to six in basketball.
"The board felt that five wasn't
enough for basketball," Michigan
athletic director and chairman of
the board H. O. (Fritz) Crisler
said after last night's closed meet-
ing.
Adjustment in Basketball
Big Ten Commissioner Bill Reed
said in Minneapolis two weeks
ago that the changing of the
total to 70 was "fairly certain,"
but that a "slight adjustment
would probably be made in the
allocation for basketball."
Reed made his comments before
the University of Minnesota's fac-
ulty senate had publicly come out
against any cut in the total num-
ber of tenders last week.
Currently, there is no limit on
the number of tenders for any
individual sport, as the blanket
limit of 80 for all sports is the
only conference regulation.
Reinstate Need Factor
In other issues last night, the
board discussed its stand on re-
instating the need factor as a
criterion for athletic tenders, a
qualification which was eliminated
in 1960.
A survey of the faculty which
was taken last year by Prof. Rob-
ert Angell of the sociology depart-
ment indicated the faculty's pref-
erence for bringing back the need
factor and for raising the grade-
point qualifications of high school
athletes from the 1.7 minimum
which the conference now re-
quires.
"The board is strongly in favor
of bringing back the need factor
and changing the academic re-
quirement," Crisler said, "but we
won't introduce any proposal at
this time as it wouldn't stand a
chance."
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Detroit 6, Xavier 0

i

By RICHARD EISENBERG
National college rankings and
bowl aspirations go on the line
today as the nation's top teams
meet an array of upset-minded
opponents.
Texas, the top ranked team in
the country, faces Texas Chris-
tian and Longhorn coach, Darrell
Royal, admits he's scared. Three
times in the modern era Texas
has come into this game with the
number one national ranking.
Each time, though heavily fav-
ored, the Longhorns ivere upset.
The last time was in 1961, when
with Texas favored by 27 points,
TCU pulled out a squeaker, 6-0.
Bowl Officials Watch Navy
Cotton Bowl officials in Dallas,
who hope to land the "dream
game" of Texas vs. Navy, will be
casting anxious eyes eastward to
Durham, N.C., where brilliant
Roger Staubach leads the Mid-
shipmen against Duke, a team
which Navy hasn't been able to
beat in the last nine years. The
game will pit Staubach, a lead-
ing contender for the Heisman
trophy, against Duke's aerial-
minded sophomore quarterback,
Scotty Clacken.
In the Midwest, fourth-ranked
Michigan State will entertain al-
ways tough Notre Dame at East

Lansing, in a non-conference
game. Michigan State is one of
the leading candidates for the
Rose Bowl where Washington ap-
parently has one spot clinched.
The Huskies will be seeking to
hand UCLA its eighth defeat at
Los Angeles.
Sooners Face Missouri
Oklahoma, beaten only by
Texas, and Nebraska,rtenth-
ranked with a 7-1 record, are neck
and neck for the Big Eight crown
and an accompanying Orange
Bowl bid. This weekend Oklahoma
battles with Missouri over na-
tional television while Nebraska
plays Oklahoma State. Both, how-
ever, will be thinking ahead to
Nov. 23, when they meet in the
key game.
In the East sixth-ranked Pitts-
burgh hosts once-beaten Army.
Princeton, undefeated til last
week's loss to Harvard, attempts
to bounce back against Yale, in
an important Ivy League contest.
Dartmouth is host to Cornell and
Harvard is at Brown in other
games that could affect the Ivy
title race.
In the South, third-ranked Mis-
sissippi, which seems to have the
inside track to the Sugar Bowl,
faces Tennessee at Memphis. The
Rebels' opponent on New Year's
Day may be powerful Pittsburgh,
despite certain segregation prob-
lems.
'Bama Battles Tech
Most of the attention in the
Southeast conference will center
on Birmingham, Ala., where Geor-
gia Tech and seventh-ranked Ala-
bama clash. Alabama will be play-
ing without star runner Mike
Frachia. Scouts from at least
four bowls will witness one of the
South's most bitter rivalries.
Georgia Tech isa touchdown un-
derdog, but the same was true
last year when the Yellow Jackets
snapped a 27-game Alabama win-
ning streak.
At Athens, Ga., the oldest ri-
valry in the Southeast is renewed
when ninth-ranked Auburn takes
on Georgia. Auburn will be at-
tempting to bounce back from last
week's first loss to Mississippi
State.
North Carolina, still in the ACC
title picture, will place its pass de-
fense, t h e nation's stingiest,
against George Mira of Miami.

PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES

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Reg. Rate
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PLAYBOY COLLEGE BUREAU

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Ann Arbor Folk and Jazz Society Presents

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LESTER
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PAUL KRAUSE
... augments receivers

SPORTS SHORTS:
Ford Signs Coach Job;
Montreal Talks to IBork'

6.>

LOOK AT THAT-Cloyd Webb, 208 lb., 6'5" Iowa senior, should
pace the Hawkeye end corps against Michigan today. Thus far,
as Iowa's top receiver, he has accounted for 402 of his team's
1,007 yards gained passing, with 22 catches and three touch-
downs.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Whitey Ford, the
New York Yankees' southpaw ace,
signed a dual contract as player
and pitching coach yesterday at
a salary estimated at $60;000.
The 35-year-old Ford, who en-
joyed one of his best seasons in
1963 while winning 24 and losing
only seven replaced Johnny Sain.
Sain was released because of a dis-
agreement on terms.
It is believed Ford is the first
active player ever to take on the
additional duties of pitching
coach.
The decision to offer the job to
-Ford was made by manager Yogi
Berra last Wednesday after nego-
tiations broke down between Gen-
eral Manager Ralph Houk and
Sain.
"We asked John to return,
along with Jim Hogan and Frank
Crosetti," explained Houk. "The
other agreed but Sam wanted
more money. We felt his demands
were unreasonable."
* * *
Negotiate for Bork
MONTREAL-George Bork. the
Northern Illinois quarterback with
a sensational record, arrived yes-
terday to negotiate with the Mon-
treal Alouettes of the Eastern
Football Conference.
Bork, who plans to play pro
football after he graduates from
Northern Illinois next spring said
several National and American
Football League teams had ap-
Lroached him about playing, "but
I think T probably wait until
hfter Christmas before I decid?'."
Bork has keen invited -o play

in the annual North-South Shrnl'e
game Dec. 21 at Miami.
"Money is important," Bork
said when asked what terms he
would seek in a contract. "But I
feel i would lake to sign with a
team that I have a future with.
In other words, with one that I
can play ball. I don't enjoy sit-
ting on the bench"
Keon Invaluable
NEW YORK - Punch Imlach,
the Toronto Maple Leafs' Gen-
eral-Manager Coach, still is talk-
ing in the millions.
"I wouldn't sell Dave Keon for
a million dollars," Imlach said
Friday, referring to his star center
who led the National Hockey
League team to two consecutive
Stanley Cup championships. "We'd
have the million, but how could
you replace a player like Keon,"
Last year, the Leafs turned
down a million dollar offer by the
Chicago Black Hawks for Frank
Mahovlich, their high-scoring left
winger.

GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
Tickets on Sale at The Disc Shop,
1201 S. University
& The Record Center, 304 S. Thayer

I

and THE FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS
TONIGHT-NOV. 16-8:30 p.m.
Ann Arbor High Auditorium

All Seats Reserved:

Tickets $3.50, 2.75, 2.00, 1 .75

SGC has been able to make available
parking stickers at a reduced rate
for the Thompson Street Structure
and other parking facilities are now open.
Inquire in Room 113 Student Activities Bldg.

FREE
A well bound copy of the
Hebrew English bilingual New
Testament will be sent abso-
lutely free without any obliga-
tion to any Jewish student or
person desiring copy upon re-
quest. Please write
H. M. MAEL
P.O. Box 9052
Grand Rapids, Mich.

One of the
seven golden keys
to brewing
Budweiser.

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