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November 15, 1963 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-15

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Education

Group

To Ask

$25

Million Hike

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
Special To The Daily
LANSING-Gov.- George Rom-
ney's advisory "blue ribbon" com-
mittee on higher education is ex-'
pected to tell the governor today
that the 10 state-supported col-
leges and universities need $135
million in operating funds -- $25
million over their current appro-
priations.
This $25 million boost would be
sho.rt of the $33.8 million hike
that the schools are asking in
their appropriation requests. But
it would be considerably higher
than the governor's currently fa-
vored estimate of a $5-10 million
increase.

V

The need for a $25 million ap-
propriation increase is outlined in
a statement of higher education
needs being submitted to the over-
all "blue ribbon" committee when
it convenes at 9 a.m. today at
Michigan State University's Kel-
logg Center, a top Lansing source
revealed yesterday.
Final Recommendation
The "blue ribbon" group will
then compose the final recommen-
dation to Romney. Lansing offi-
cials anticipate this final recom-
mendation will also advise the $25
million increase.
The statement being submit-
ted to the "blue ribbon" commit-
tee was framed by the key "in-
terim" subcommittee charged with

assessing the immediate needs of1
state higher education.
This statement will also advise
that capital outlay funds - used
for construction-be practically
doubled to $47 million from their
current $25 million level, the
source said.'
However, Alvin Bentley, chair-
man of the "interim" subcommit-
tee, noted recently that the re-
port will not offer suggestions for
accumulating the revenue need-
ed to make both the operational
increases and the capital outlay
boosts.
"We were told to chart the
needs of higher education in the
state of Michigan and not how to
finance them," he explained.

By avoiding revenue accumula-
tion questions, the subcommittee
"made certain" that the contro-
versial topics of tuition increases
and bond issues were omitted, he
noted.
The question of where the mon-
ey to finance higher education in-
creases will come from has been
considered recently by Romney
budget aides, the source reported.
Available Revenues
They have emphasized that the
recommendations coming from the
group today will have to be
weighed against the revenues
available before the governor can
compile a final higher education
recommendation for the Legisla-
ture.

Of the $25 million boost in oper-
ational funds which the subcom-
mittee is asking, only $12 million
are for enrollment and cost in-
creases, the Lansing source com-
mented.
These funds would provide for
the projected seven per cent en-
rollment increases-about 10,000
students-in the 10 state higher
institutions next year and the four
per cent cost increases.
Per-Student Basis
"These have been compiled on a
firm per-student basis backed by
strong statistical justification," the
source explained.
He indicated, however, that the
other $13 million proposed fund
boosts "are aimed mainly at im-

provements - without statistical
substantiation."
A Romney aide observed that
these might be at first ignored if
the "blue ribbon" group recom-
mends them as part of the full
$25 million increase that the sub-
committee has outlined.
Enrollment, Salaries
In addition to the operational
and capital outlay fund boosts
that are suggested, the subcommit-
tee report discusses enrollment
predictions, faculty salaries and
the community college system.
The source disclosed that the
community colleges were not, how-
ever, included in the $25 million
budget increases.
Although it is common to speak

of the higher education appro-
priation as going to only the 10
universities and colleges, in ac-
tuality, the same appropriation
bill from the Legislature supplies
funds for both groups.
Community Colleges
Community colleges will, how-
ever, be recommended capital out-
lay increases among the $47 mil-
lion boost suggested.
After discussing the report, the
"blue ribbon" group will turn to
making future plans for its final
long-range report due next No-
vember, the source indicated.
The original assignment of the
"blue ribbon" committee was to
chart the needs of state higher
education for the next 10 years.

For its immediate report to help
the governor make his appropria-
tion recommendations in January,
the "interim" subcommittee was
appointed.
The long-range report will be
compiled in a similar manner as
was used for the interim report.
The source explained that this will
involve the increased use of sub-
committees to investigate specific
areas such as enrollment, commu-
nity colleges, and capital outlay
needs.
The "blue ribbon" chairman,
Don F. Karn and co-chairmen Ed-
ward Cushman and Irving Blue-
stone, met with Romney last night
to discuss the report and finalize
the subcommittee structure.

.,

ANALYZING THE 'U'S
BUDGET, NEEDS
See Editorial Page

Y

Sir iEan
Seventy-Three Years of Editorial Freedom

74Iaiti

CLOUDY
Low-35
High--48
Fair and cool
this evening

VOL. LXXIV, No. 65 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1963 SEVEN CENTS

TEN PAGES

U

S

*

*

* *[

* *

* *

*

* * *

Lea ue,
Union Gives
First Report
Full Backing
League Board Wants
Further Investigation
By JOHN BRYANT
and MARGARET LOWE
The Michigan Union Board of
Directors last night declared that
it still fully supports the Union-
League Study Committee Report
(Robertson Report) while the
Women's League Board of Gov-
ernors appointed an implementa-
tion committee Wednesday toM
study further the recommenda-
tions of the Regents concerning
this report and work with a com- RAY
parable committee of the Union.
The Union Board, in support-
ing the report, noted that it "has
not as yet received general sup-
port from all of the interested
parties" and that "further am-
ea-ination of the concept is appar-
ently still necessary."
Also, the Board gave the Union
president the power to create any
committees necessary to begin
work in two areas, implementa-
tion of any part of the Robertson
Report and a study of the Union
Board itself based on the concepts
advanced in the report. It also
could reopen negotiations on the
University Center concept.
Flexibility
According to Union President
Raymond Rusnak, '64, this power
was given to him so that he might
Sbe more flexible in working with { *
the League committee.
"By doing this, our committee
could be restructured or even di-
vided in order to meet the needs
of the situation. Otherwise, we
would be forced to wait until one
of the monthly Board meetings. GRE
The League committee, com- ...
posed of its executive. officers, one
faculty member and one alumnae, A SIG
will function in five areas:
t Five Areas
1. To consider the Regents'
statement with respect to the re-
port of the Union-League Study
Committeet
2. To outline a structure of com-
Sbined student activities for the
Union and the League; "The v
3. To determine the relationship cluding the
f such a program to the League truth," Rev
4Board (and possibly the Union and Helent
Board);
4. To determine its space and Father
financial needs; Student's S
5. To determine the relationship ship by E
of the merged student activities period of d
to other student organizations. A grea
Close Cooperation which were
League President Gr et che ea nlu
Groth, '64, said that she hopes area, inclu
that the implementation commit- A chem
tee will be able to begin work in United Sta
the immediate future and. that element in
+hsi TPomie ae the ninn miH h erniain anv

Union

Act

on

Aer er

Plan

A - I

TMOND RUSNAK
Robertson report

State Board
Accepts Bid
For College
Special To The Daily
LANSING-Any parcel of hope
to set up a University four-year
branch at Delta was extinguished
Wednesday.
The State Board of Education
approved a revised proposal which
creates a two year private senior
college near the Delta Commun-
ity (junior) College which will be
under a separate board and group
of administrators.
The State Board had deadlocked
2-2 earlier this year over the legal
complication involved in a pro-
posal which sought to establish the
senior college (a private institu-
tion) under the auspices of the
same board and administrators of
the community college (a public
institution).
Legal Question
James O'Neil, one of the State
Board members who objected pre-
viously, explained that he had
switched his vote Wednesday "be-
cause I was satisfied that the legal
question raised is answered by this
new proposal."
University attempts to create a
four-year branch at Delta in the
Saginaw - Midland - Bay county
area began with talks in late 1962
with the Delta Board, the trustees
of Delta College.
These talks culminated in the
creation of a proposal, released in
February 1963, "for a degree-
granting institution in the Sagi-
naw Valley in affiliation with the
University of Michigan.
Blue Ribbon Committee
This proposal was submitted as
a resolution to the Legislature but
was eventually sent to the gov-
ernor's "blue ribbon" higher edu-
cation committee for consideration
along with alternate proposals.

Enrollment Projections

I

Actual
1962
Undergrad- Graduate
uate Enroll-

Desired

1968
Undergrad- Graduate
uate Enroll-

1975

Undergrad-
uate

Graduate

A. & D.
Bus. Ad.
Dearborn
Dentistry
Education
Engineering
Flint
Law
L. S.&A.
Medicine
Music
Nat. Res.
Nursing
Pharmacy
Pub. Health
Soc. Work
TOTAL

Enrollment
726
329
525
80
1171
2876
536

ment
69
604
428
1654
1173

998
8402 2774
1438
479 221
167 95
695 17
144 37
32 233
301
16132 10420

Total
795
933
525
508
2825
4049
536
998
11176
1438
700
262
712
181
265
301
26552

Enrollment
1300
400
800
114
1591
3800
1000

1250
11000. 3720
1540
650 330
192 139
975 80
190 75
350
450
22012 14327

ment
138
875
350
509
2246
1975

Total Enrollmhent

1438
1275
1150
623
3837
5775
1000
1250
14720
1540
980
331
1055
265
350
450
36339

1470
500
1200,
150
2081
4400
1300

1500
14600 5236
1838
800 465
230 170
1200 143
280 100
425
600
28211 19320

Enroll-
ment
150
1350
700
680
2938
2700

Total
1620
1850
1900
830
5019
7100
1300
1500
19836
1838
1265
700
1343
380
425
600
47531

THE ABOVE FIGURES are projections by the University of desired enrollments for 1968
and 1975. The data were drawn up by the individual schools and colleges and assembled by
the Office of Academic Affairs to be used for long-range planning discussion. However, the
figures are extremely tentative and preliminary, according to University officials; many are
only "guesstimates" and all are subject to change. Several miscellaneous statistics are not in
the aboxe box, so the sum of individual figures does not match the totals given. For further
projections, see Page 5.
LIMIT ON ACADEMIC HOURS:
GSC Moves Against Policy

Narrowly Defeat
Key Amendment
Romney Says Rejection of Proposal
Indicates opposition to Total Idea
By THOMAS COPI
Special To The Daily
LANSING-Gov. George Romney's fiscal reform program
was killed yesterday in the House of Representatives.
In a relatively short and quiet session, the House voted
the governor's tax package down 47-44 by refusing to add a
special "tie-in" amendment to Romney's proposal for a state-
wide income tax.
Romney had said that refusal to add the "tie-in" amend-
ment to the income tax bill would be sufficient indication that
the Legislature is opposed toym _

the idea of fiscal reform, and
that he would back a motion
to adjourn if such' action was
taken.
'Partisanship'
The governor blamed the fail-
ure of his tax reform package on
lack of bipartisan support, and
pointed out "partisanship" as the
state's major problem.
The "tie-in" amendment would
have made enactment of the in-
come tax conditional on the pass-
age of the remainder of Romney's
program.
A total of 31 Democrats and 16
Republicans voted down the
amendment which effectively kill-
ed the governor's tax program.
Party Splits
Eight Democrats and 36 Repub-
licans voted in favor of the meas-
ure, illustrating the party splits
which were to play such an im-
portant part in the death of the
plan.
In Senate action last week, the
program was killed for all practi-
cal purposes on that side of the
Capitol.
The Senate had taken no ac-
tion since Nov. 5 when they de-
feated by a 20-11 count a plan to
substitute Romney's income tax
plan for another bill on the floor,
because the governor's was hope-
lessly locked in the Taxation Com-
mittee.
Two-House Defeat
Thus, both houses of the Legis-
lature defeated Romney's fiscal re-
form program without ever actual-
ly voting on the controversial
See ROMNEY, Page 5

By ALISON SMALLEY
G r a d u a t e Student Council
members voted unanimously last
night on a motion conveying their
general disapproval to Dean
Ralph A. Sawyer of the graduate
school of strict enforcement of the
policy limiting the number of
academic hours for working grad-
uate students.

The motion came as a result of
letters, sent by Dean Sawyer's of-
fice, to teaching fellows who have
credit for, or are auditing courses
for ten or more hours. These re-
quested that teaching fellows
working half time drop course
credit hours to eight.
Although a regulation concern-
ing academic hours of all working

TCHEN GROTH
new committee

N FOR SKEPTICS:
Veeping Icons Reeal Work of God'
By JEFFREY GOODMAN '""

graduate students has been on the
books for years, this is the first
time it has been enforced.
Arbitrary Method
The Council expressed dislike
for the arbitrary method requir-
ing teaching fellows to drop
courses two-thirds of the way
through the semester. it also said
that by sending the letters only
to teaching fellows, graduate stu-
dents are discouraged from work-
ing in this field, because of the
credit hour decrease.
In the past, the number of
credit hours a graduate Student
could take were handled on an in-
dividual basis. Advisors, ignorant
of the maximum limit, signed
slips allowing working graduate
students to exceed this limit. Any
student aware of the restriction
could request special permission
from the dean to take more credit
hours.
Lowers Academic Pressure
Dean Sawyer's office says that
limiting the amount of hours a
graduate takes as a teaching fel-
low will result in better perform-
ance because of the lowered aca-
demic pressure. It adds that a stu-
dent is not registered in the Uni-
versity until this time in the se-
mester, because of the extent of
student classification required.
The motion goes on to request

GEORGE ROMNEY
... program dies
IFC
Pick Three
For Posts
The Fraternity Presidents As-
sociation last night approved the
nomination of Ralph Rumsey,
'65 BAd, Michael Bixby, '65, and
Thomas Ayers, '65, to the Inter-
fraternity Council Membership
Committee.
"The committee will endeavor
to help individual fraternities in
this area," they said.

validity of the shedding of tears by these three icons, in-
e 'Our Lady of the Gate' icon, stands as an unshakeable
v. Father Miltiades B. Efthimiou of the Sts. Constantine
Greek Orthodox Church of Detroit said last night.
Efthimiou spoke as the guest of the Eastern Orthodox
Society on three icons (religious paintings used in wor-
astern Orthodox people) which shed actual tears for a
ays in 1960.
t deal of sensationalism was stirred by the three icons,
e seen tearing by hundreds of people in the Long Island
ding New York reporters and photographers.
rical analysis done on tears from the second icon by the
tes Testing Laboratories revealed that the only organic
the tears was chlorine. The laboratory was unable to
v of the other nmnonents

MSU Development Plan
Studies Enrollment
By SUSAN JACOBY
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING-Michigan State University's Educational
Development Project has outlined its goals but still lacks con-
crete proposals for implementation after nearly a year.
University officials say an organization for implementing
the project was created when the Academic Council approved
the newest EDP document Oct. 8.
The revised EDP calls for a three-pronged attack on the
nrobnem of an enrollment which is expected to reach 42,000 by

%al.l; M WTIWE SZ9

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