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November 14, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I4. I963

PAGESIXT~l MIHIGA DALY HURDAY. NfEMV 1_

, 1avo

I

GRID SELECTIONS

Keen's Matmen Eye Another Title

LIBERAL

ARTS

.

Get your name in The Michigan Daily. Of course one way is
to drop in here and fill out an official Grid Picks entry before 9 p.m.
Friday and win two free tickets to the Michigan Theater, which is
now showing "Incredible Journey."
The other way?
Why, breaking all precedent, the noble sports staff will run
the name of the unfortunate who picks the most number of games
WRONG. Don't forget, now. You are to try and get them all right
or all wrong.
To give you a clue, in one of the big games, Texas Christian
meets Texas, and three of the four times in which the Longhornsl
have been going through a season undefeated and untied, the
miserable Horned Frogs have risen up to give them a beating.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

ALL DEGREE LEVELS
9 Analytic Research
! Language Program
* Computer Programming
* Mathematics
* Statistics
ALL ACADEMIC MAJORS
NEEDED
Training in Specialized Techniques
Are Provided by NSA
Liberal Arts Majors (except mathema-
ticians) are required to take the PRO-
FESSIONAL QUALIFICATION TEST
given on
7 DECEMBER, 1963
Applications for test MUST BE IN NOT
LATER THAN 22 NOVEMBER.
See your COLLEGE PLACEMENT OFFICER now
for a Test Bulletin containing further details.
Since no test is required for math majors, they
should contact their college placement officer
for an interview with an NSA representative.
NATIONAL . SECURITY
AGENCY
WASHINGTON, D.C. area
An Equal Opportunity Employer

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9.
10.

Iowa at Michigan (SCORE)
Illinois at Wisconsin
Minnesota at Purdue
Northwestern at Ohio State
Notre Dame at Michigan St.
Indiana at Oregon
Georgia Tech at Alabama
Arkansas at So. Methodist
Maryland at Clemson
Navy at Duke

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Louisiana St. at Mississipi St.
Miami (Fla) at No. Carolina
Oregon State at Southern Cal
Army at Pittsburgh
Texas Christian at Texas
Vanderbilt at Tulane
Washington at UCLA
Stanford at Washington State
Yale at Princeton
Oklahoma at Missouri

By TOM ROWLAND
Michigan wrestling coach Cliff
Keen will have a Big Ten cham-
pion team at his back and a well-
stocked crew in front of him as
he starts his 38th year at the
Wolverine mat helm this winter.
The Wolverines are defending
conference titlists after rolling
past second-place Iowa in the
Big Ten tourney a year ago, and
Keen has all but two of his
championship lineup returning.
"We'll have a good team," com-
ments Keen, "but it's too early
to start thinking about any line-
up. Every position is up for grabs."
Keen knew he would have to
fill the heavyweight spot vacated
by Big Ten champ Jack Barden,
but there will be another big open-
ing at the other end of the weight
scale-123 pounds-where Carl
Rhodes didn't return to school
this year. Rhodes was expected to
be a mainstay in the lightweight
division.
Two More
Also gone this winter are 147-
pounder Jim Keen and last year's
captain Nick Armelagos-both
with their years of eligibility spent
-but elsewhere the Wolverines are
going to be well supplied with
experienced returnees.
"It's going to be a toss-up for
Rhodes' place," says Keen. "Ralph
Bahna wrestled several matches
for us last year at 123, and he'll be
a big contender for the spot. Two
sophomores in there will be Tino
Lambrose and Jesse Pitt.
"Pitt broke some bones in his
hand last Friday, and we'll have
to wait and see how fast he re-
covers."
The big name at the 130-pound
position will be junior Dave Doze-
man, who made a good showing at
the conference meet last year andI

won the first place consolation at
130. Soph Billy Johannesen and
junior Doug Horning are also like-
ly to have a good chance at the
spot.
"Dozeman will probably com-
pete for the 130-pound position
unless he can't make the weight,"
says Keen. "Last year he alter-
nated between 130 and 137 and
may do the same thing this year."
Strong Bet
Gary Wilcox looks like a strong
bet at 137, but outstanding sopho-
more Carl Jenkins could give him
a fight for the starting spot along
with Dozeman.
One of Keen's most outstanding
sophs last year was 147-pounder
Lee Deitrick, who was nipped out
of a Big Ten championship in the
147 final match. He'll be back at
147 but may possibly move up into
the 157-pound bracket.
The Wolverines will be well
stocked in that 157 class. Veteran
Wayne Miller is team captain and
will no doubt see plenty of action.
The only returning Big Ten
champ, Rick Bay, is a 157-poun-
der, but football will keep him off
the mats for the next few weeks.
"We expect that it will take a
while for Rick to get into shape
for wrestling," comments Keen,
"but we're hopingthathe'll make
it before the season is too far
along.
"Bay can also wrestle at, 167, es-
pecially if Chris Stowell doesn't
make this weight and moves up to
177. Also at 167 we've got Dave
Post, who has been looking good
this year. Jim Evashevski is an-
other promising sophomore."
Vacated Heavyweight
Joe Arcure, who saw action in a
couple of meets last year, can
wrestle at 177 or in the vacant

heavyweight bracket. Other likely'
grapplers to anchor the lineup are
Bob Spaly, who wrestled at 177 in
the Big Ten meet, and sophomore
Byron Tennant.
As for the efforts of the rest
of the conference trying to un-
seat the defending mat champs,
Keen comments soberly, "There
isn't a team that won't be rough.
Each year this conference gets
tougher.

"Michigan State, as usual, is
going to be a powerhouse, they're
just loaded with talent. Iowa, too,
is going to be strong. They lost a
couple of experienced boys, but
they also had a very good fresh-
man team last year.
"As for us. we've got good per-
sonnel, and the team shows a lot
of good desire. If they keep it up
we're going to be a strong title
contender."

MICHIGAN UNION CAFETERIA
Thursday Night's Featured Item
BROILED HALF CHICKEN
Served in the
CENTER ROOM 5-7 P.M.

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'ur - --

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PETITIONS are now available for the
SGC MEMBERSHIP
TRIBUNAL
in the SGC offices. Petitions are
due December 3, 1963, at 5:00.
SEE and H EAR
The Outstanding
K LH
The MUSIC CENTER, Inc.
1304 S. University 304 S. Thayer
In Campus Village Opposite Hill Aud.

STAR GRAPPLER-BA-Chris Stowell, who compiled a 7-2 record as
a sophomore last year, may move up to the 177-pound division.
He started the team off on the right foot last year by notching
the team's first pin in its first meet of the season.
'CLASS' CLASH:
Sit-In Stalls Return
Of Football at Chicago

......

Read and Use
Michigan Daily Classifieds

a -

COLLEGE GRADUATES-
TRAINING PROGRAMS LEADING TO
INTERESTING CAREER POSITIONS
OFFERED BY
THE STATE OF MICHIGAN
STARTING ANNUAL SALARI ES-
$5,804.64 and $6,117.84

MIGHTY MATMAN-Junior Dave Dozeman will figure heavily
as the Wolverines attempt to repeat as Big Ten champions.
Last year Dozeman finished 5-1 in dual meets, and won the
first place consolations at 130 pounds in the conference meet.

Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO--Football may be
coming back to the University of
Chicago, but not without a fight.
Stagg Field here looked more
like Birmingham, Ala., last Friday
as 200 students delayed a football
game for two hours by "sitting-in"
across the 50-yard line.
The sit-in, which hq d been
threatened on several earlier oc-
casions, was finally triggered by
an announcement Thursday that
CBS-TV would film the game be-
tween Chicago and North Central
College. The demonstration, its
sponsors said, was to protest the
"undue publicity" the broadcast
would give to football at the uni-
versity.
Only 'Class?'
The administration line is that
there is no football team but only
a "class" which happens to hold
scrimmages w i t h " neighboring
schools. Some students say it looks
like football to them, since classes
are held complete with cheerlead-
ers, programs and up to 1000 spec-
tators. (Football was officially
dropped at U.C. in 1939.)
Half an hour before game time,
demonstrators seated themselves
in the middle of the field and
,withstood the attempts of univer-
sity officials, campus and city po-
lice to remove them. Several stu-
dents were piled into a paddy
wagon but later were released at
the university's request.
The opening kickoff was moved
to the 40-yard line since the 50-
yard line was filled with demon-
strators. One of them, however,

stole the ball and prevented all
play. After recovering the ball,
Chicago lost the game, 7-6.
What Else?
When asked for a comment,
U.C.'s coach Sid Stein said, "It
was an unusual play we lost on, a
fumbled lateral.'
Demonstrators' signs read "Ban
the Ball," "Hutchins Is Our Lead-
er," !No Big Ten, No Little Ten,
No Middle Ten," and "Today
North Central, Tomorow the
World."
Signs interpreted as pro-football
included "Football Players Have
More Sex Appeal." "Football Si,
Odd Balls No," and "Study and
Football Are Mutually Exclusive,
Eliminate Study."
Sailing Club
Takes Second
The Michigan sailing club quali-
fied for the Midwestern Cham-
pionships last weekend by placing
second in the District 'A' elimina-
tions.
Detroit won the regatta with a
score of 28. Michigan followed
with 26. Wayne scored 23 points
and Michigan State trailed with
18.
During the weekend of Novem-
ber 29-31 the Midwestern cham-
pionship will be held in Chicago.
Dick Ruettinger was the high
point skipper last weekend.. Also
in the crew were Chuck Cannon,
Bill Moss and Terry Timm.

11

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I1

AREAS:

All $3.98
12" IPs

Administrative Analysis
Agricultural
Budgetary Control
Chemistry
Economic Research
Employment Counseling
Forestry
Game and Fish Biology
Geology
Highway Planning
Institutional
Management
Insurance Examining

OPEN MONDAY TILL 8:30

Land Appraisal
Library Science
Mathematics
Parole and Probation
Personnel Methods
Personnel Technical
Processing
Physics
Property Appraising
Psychology
Purchasing
Right of Way Buying
Vocational Rehabilitation

airy- :.s

9

)

Ii'

Michigan Civil Service is now recruiting applicants for
its current examination program. Trainee positions in-
volving on-the-job development programs will be filled
from this examination. Variations in majors required
according to class.
Write to the MICHIGAN CIVIL SERVICE COMMIS-
SION, LANSING, MICHIGAN, 48913, for examination
applications. An equal opportunity employer.
BENEFITS AVAILABLE TO
STATE OF MICHIGAN EMPLOYEES:
Pay rates well in line with those of other employers
Regular salary increases
Transfer and promotional opportunities
State contributory group health and life insurance pro-
grams-State pays major share

Hundreds To
Choose From:
Including:
Blowin in the Wind-Peter, Paul &
Mary

The new Campus boot from
S.FxA University Shoe Collection
From our large and rugged group that
tread -the best quadrangles in the country,
we feature this handsome boot in etched
saddle leather, with crepe rubber sole and
heel. We see it winning honors for good
looks and great wear-with-all; in natural

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Your bike has
feelings, too!

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it in

*7
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Movin'-Peter, Paul & Mary
Peter, Paul & Mary
Trini Lopez At PJ's

for a complete
6 WINTERIZATION

All The Top Stars!

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