100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1963 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9i

ErGnT

Tur MICHIGAN DATTV

MY TYI@f iPi M1 H +a. rwysaw.,i ,... .,.. w . .e......

aIaa r JJ l.ZRZ . isaCR a vt lU ZF r .J _.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1963

I

11

r UDUI T:

'U' Faces Financial Crisis

1
l
{}
I'

(Continued from Page 1)
E. Lesch of the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs.
Neither the administration nor
the faculty are satisfied, however.
"The disparity between progress
at the University and the advances
at other institutions makes it in-
creasingly difficult to meet com-
petition and retain present facul-
ty and staff and attract needed
new faculty members," the budget
message states.
Both the University's anticipat-
ed enrollment increases and the
lack of new staff hiring have al-
ready been cited. The two factors
are obviously contradictory. "We
are definitely understaffed," Nie-
huss asserts.
The University plans to add 170
teachers to its staff if it receives
the full appropriation. This addi-
tion, which would raise the total'
staff to roughly 2000, would main-
tain a student-faculty ratio of
1:14. What if the appropriation
doesn't come through? "We can't
keep taking in students without
more faculty," one prominent ad-
ministrator said.
Aside from enlarging the teach-
ing staff, the Regents claim that
"the anticipated larger student
body and current deficiencies
make it imperative that the Uni-
versity . . . expand instructional
programs, increase allocations for
instructional materials and equip-
ment and meet the higher de-
mands upon the admission and
registration offices and general
administrative services."
Library Services
Vice-President Niehuss considers
library books and services funds
second in importance only to sal-
ary increases. The total request
runs a little over $500,000.
"Library facilities are one of
the determining factors in wheth-
er or not a faculty member will
stay or come here," Niehuss says.
A study by Frederick H. Wagman,
director of the University Library,
has shown that while the Univer-
sity has the highest graduate and
second highest total enrollment of
any school in the country, its li-
brary expenditures rank far below
those of most comparable insti-
tutions.
Building maintenance falls in
the same pattern. "All you have to
do is look around to see that the
campus isn't kept up the way it
used to be," Niehuss observes. The
total requested increase of $566,-
000 includes provisions for the
operation of such new buildings as'
the music school and Fluids En-7

INADEQUATE?-The oft-crowded Undergraduate Library is part
of a library system which University officials feel has fallen be-
hind growing enrollment and faculty needs. Library expansion
has been given high priority in the 1964-65 request for state
appropriations increases.

gineering II construction on
North Campus.
Research and public service re-
quests involve primarily the Insti-
tute of Science and Technology,
($550,000) and secondarily, vari-
ous government projects, business
projects and experimental work in
radio and television ($290,000).
The appropriation for third
term operation is needed to im-
plement trimester plans. While the
University moved toward a tri-
mester schedule this year, the Leg-
islature did not provide funds with
which to establish a full summer
term next year. The University is
asking $1.2 million to implement
the program in 1965.
However, most administrators
admit the program will be dead for
1965 unless the Legislature com-
mits itself to an appropriation by
the end of the year, an unlikely
prospect. Earlier this week, N. Edd
Miller of the Office of Academic
Affairs predicted that full year-
round operation would not go into
effect for "decades."
Lansing a Factor
While the University considers
all of its requested increases nec-
essary, recent history would seem
to deny optimism. Indications
from Lansing have not raised any
hopes. State Comptroller Glenn
Allen said last week that the to-
tal appropriation for higher edu-
cation-which covers nine other
institutions besides the Univer-
sity-would receive, only a $10
million increase, to $120 million,
in Gov. George Romney's recom-
mendations to the Legislature.
The dubious status of Romney's
fiscal reform plans leaves even
that figure in doubt.
On the other hand; both Uni-
versity and state officials have
suggested that Romney's "blue
ribbon" education committee will
recommend to the governor a to-
tal higher education budget of
$140 million. This figure is much
closer to the $144.8 million re-
quested by the ten institutions for
the next fiscal year.
Where does this leave the Uni-
versity? "We've been told that no
figure has been set," Niehuss said.
University officials will go to

Lansing to discuss the budget late
this month. Romney will make his
recommendations to the Legisla-
ture in December.
"Until we know otherwise, we
assume that we'll get what we
ask for," Niehuss remarked. "We
haven't started discussing what
we'll do if the appropriation fol-
lows the pattern of the last several
years."
He added that, "we can't keep
living on promises of 'next year' as
far as our staff is concerned.
Without the necessary funds there
has to be a breaking point. We
can't maintain our quality and in-
crease our quantity, both of which
are necessary to cope with ex-
panding enrollment.
"Of course, the University is not
going to fold up. But we cannot
forever continue to avoid two ser-
ious consequences: a deteriorating
quality of instruction and a place
less desirable to faculty."
Staff, Niehuss said, is the key to
a good University. "Classroom
space can always be found some-
how; teaching excellence cannot."
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Alpha Phi Omega, H{ospital Party, Nov.
7, 6:45 p.m., Univ. Hospital, 13th Floor.
* * *
Baha'i Student Group, Ego: A Baha'i
Interpretation, Nov. 8, 8 p.m., 500 E.
William, Apt. 3.
Cercie Francais, Coffee Hour, Nov. 7,
3-5 p.m., 3050 FB,
Christian Science Org., Testimony
Meeting, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m., SAB, Room
528D.
* * *
Congr. Disc. E & R Student Guild,
Mid-week Worship, Nov. 7, 12:10 p.m.,
Douglas Memorial Chapel,
* * *
Physical Therapy Club, Film, Nov. 7,
7:30 p.m., 5603 University Hospital,
S* * m
Russian Club, Coffee, Russian Rec-
ords, Conversation, Nov. 7, 3-5 p.m.,
FB, Faculty Lounge, 4th Floor.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, Planning
Session and Social Hour, Nov. 10, 7:30
p.m., Unitarian Church.

C
E
1
i
z
3
t
t
t
C
3
f
c
I
I
i
c
(E

Washington State Civil Service-Cadet China Lake, Calif-All Degrees: AE &
Teacher of the Deaf-require 2 yrs. Astro., ChE, EE, EM & ME & Physics,
DAILY OFFICIAL college with major study in educ. MS-PhD: Chem.-(Analyt. & Org.) &
* * * Math. BS: E Math. R. & D., Des. & Test.
BULLETIN For further information, please call__
a Ext.3544, Bureau of Appointments, 3200
(Continued from Page 5) SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB- Employmen
Law School Admission Test: Candi- Camp Mataponi, Maine-Will inter-
dates who are registered to take the view on Fri., Nov. 8 (tomorrow) from The following part-time jobs are
Law School Admission Test on Nov. 9, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Summer Placement. available. Applications for these jobs
are asked to report to 100 Hutchins Possible openings are for women as: can be made in the Part-time Placement
Hall on Sat, morning at 8:30 a.m. group head, waterfront counselor, sail- Office 2200 Student Activities Bldg.,
ing counselor, tennis counselor, golfi during the following hours: Mon. thru
Law School Admission Test: Those counselor & land sports. Minimum age Fri.. 8 a.m 1il 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
candidates who were scheduled to take is 21.Emlyrdeiosfhrngtuns
the Law School Admission Test on Nov, Information from the U.S. Dept. of E for part-time or full-time temporary
9 in East Lansing, and who have reg- Interior has arrived concerning summer work, should contact Dave Lowman,
istered at 122 Rackham Bldg., are asked employment as range, forestry, survey- Part-time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext.
to report to Aud. B, Angell Hall on Sat. ing, engrg. & fire control aides. S s i c o
morning at 8:30 a.m. Rochester Gas & Electric Corp., New jobsshoud dosult the b nboard
York-Interviewing Nov. 12 at Engrg. in Room 2200, daily.
French and German Screening Exam- Placement. Sign schedule at 12-H W. 1-Laboratory Technician to work one
inations: The screening exams in French Engrg. Male, U.S. citizens in ChE, EE, day a week (8 hrs.). Will be trained
and German for Doctoral candidates IE, ME & Acc't. Soph., Jr. for specific ob, but some lab ex-
will be administered on Tues., Nov. 12, perience necessary.
from 3-5 p.m. in A ud. C, Angell Hall. TEACHER PLACEMENT: 1-Illustrator to work approx. 10 to 20
screening exam before taking the writ- Beginning the week of Nov. 1.1, the hrs./wk. Must have some experience.
ten test in French or German, unless following schools will be at the Bureau Will be doing straight copy work.
they have received B or better in to interview prospective teachers for 1-Switchboard Operator to be on call
Frencha rI or German 111. Those who this year and next: days. Hours are flexible.
failed to pass the screening exam in WED., NOV. 13- 1-Psyche Aide. Female, 23-32 yrs. of BE
Oct. may not attempt it again until Flint, Mich.-Grades K-6; Type A. Sp. age with college background to
Dec. Ed.; El. Sci.; Rem. Read.; Sp. Corr.; work with adolescents. Hours are 12 D
JH Math; Girls PE; Visit. Teacher a.m. to 8 a.m. Mon. through Fri.
Farmer Woodrow Wilson Fellows (in- Home Ec./Engl. 10-Students from Dearborn area need- D
eluding Honorary Fellows) who will be- Swartz Creek, Mich.-Grades 1, 2, 3, ed for part-time sales work in local
gin full-time work on their disserta- THURS., NOV. 14- clothing store until June. Must H
tions in Feb., March, or April, 1964, Cleveland, Ohio-Kindergarten; Elem.; work full-time during summer in
and who will complete all require- All secondary fields except Russian and e n branch. Experience not M
ments for the doctorate within four German._essential.
and one-quarter calendar years after Detroit, Mich. W
beginning grad level study, may now * *
initiate applications for Woodrow Wil- For appointments and additional in- Pern
son Dissertation Fellowships. Prospec- formation contact the Bureau of Ap-M
tive candidates must see Associate Dean pointments, 3200 SAB, 663-1511, Ext.-
Miller, Room 118 Rackham Bldg. not 3547,
later than Wed., Nov. 13.M
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
ITRVIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please SC
acemen sign interview schedules at 128-H West
ANNOUNCEMENT: Engrg, for appts. with the following: H
jApplications for the New York State NOV. 8-
Examnareenow Aeronca Manufacturing Corp., Middle- SC
Civil Service Entrance Ea r o town, Ohio-BS: AE & Astro., EE & ME. S
available at the Bureau of Appoint- o. tin. & asrn., EE tar-
ments, 3200 SAB. Applications must be 24 mo. trn. &SDev assignment in tar- T
picked up immediately & filed by Nov. get missiles, space antennae & honeyS
12. The exam is on Dec. 7 & will prob-s comb sandwich construction for space k
ably be given in Ann Arbor. This isis . r te.,.
the general entrance test for N.Y. State, Atlantic Refining Co., Systems Plan- 1"'
corresponding to FSEE for the U.S. ning Dept., Philadelphia, Pa.-MS-PhD:
Candidates not required to be New EE & IE. Mgmt. Engnr.; Res. Analyst. BE
York state residents, but must be U.S. International Harvester Co., All cor-
citizen. porate operations-BS-MS: CE, EE, EM, BR
IE, Mat'Is., ME, Met. BS: E Math & Sci.
POSITION OPENINGS: Engrg. Dec. grads. R. & D., Des., Prod. M
The Orchards, Livonia, Mich.-A resi- & Sales.
dential treatment center for emotion- Johnson Service Co., R & D, Prod.
ally disturbed children. Opening for 1 Engrg. & Mfg. in Milwaukee. Sales M
full-time & 2 part-time child care coun- Engrg. in 114 branch offices throughout
selors. Grad students & recent grads the U.S. & Canada--All Degrees: EE & ST
interested in exper. as a prelude to ME. BS: CE, EM, E Physics, IE & Sci. E.
going on to grad work in social work, R. & D., Des.. Prod. & Sales.?G
social sciences, psych. & educ. can bene- Phillips Petroleum Co., Primarily Res.
fit from this exper. A mature young & Dev. Ctr., Bartlesville, Okla. - All
student, senior, whose sch. schedule Degrees: ChE, EE, ME. MS-PhD: Instru-
would allow him to work full-time will mentation. BS-MS: Mat'ls. & Met. PhD:
be considered. Interested in full-time EM. R. & D., Des. xr
living-in staff capable of working with Watkins-Johnson Co., Palo Alto, Calif. xrL
children & who have recreational skills. -All Degrees: EE & Physics. MS-PhD:
Michigan Civil Service-Announcing Commun. Sci. BS: E Physics. R. & D.
open competitive trainee exams for the U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station,
following: Admin. Analyst, Buyer, Econ. - - _------
Res. Ass't., Employment Counselor, In-
stitution Mgmt., Insurance Examiner, CHRISTMAS TOUR
Math, Personnel Methods, Personnel
Tech., Physicist, Adult Corrections, OF EUROPE
Chemist, Budget Analyst, Corrections SUNDAY, NOV. 17 8:15 P.M.
Psych~,Librarian, etc. Require Bache- From Detroit MASONIC A U1D
lor's degree. Apply by Nov. 22 for exam Detroi
on Dec. 7; Dec. 27 for exam on Jan. 11. as low a $640.65
Other exams in spring.ss$ - Tickets: $4.50, 3.50, 2 50. Grinnells,
PneumodynamicsCr 15ed' alinclusive 115 Woodward; Marwils' Northland;
Ohio-Openings include: 1) Quality As- MscWrd 81Wowr n
surance Engnr.-BS degree plus 2-3 C Miss ZICILand of Hi/Fi, 8880 Grand River.
yrs. Quality Control Engrg. exper.; 2) For mail order enclose self-address
Group Leader-Data Processing-degree 663-1561, Ext. 245 ed stamped envelope.
engrg. or math-minimum 9 yrs. exper.; I # :a-#
3) Welding Engnr.-degree met, or
welding engrg. plus 3-5 yrs. exper.; 4)
Sr. Engnr.-Structures-Engrg. degree::
plus exper.
Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital, Man-
stique, Mich.-Opening for Registered
Lab. Technician, ASCP. Medical Tech-
nologist, male or female to run small
hospital lab.
City of Grand Rapids, Mich.-Public
Health Educator-degree in the basic
sciences or subjects related to public
health or educ. Possession of a Master
of Public Health degree. Some field
exper

VORAK:

EPIC

SLAVONIC DANCES

AYDN: SYM. No. 88 "Paris"; SYM. No. 104 "London"
AHLER: SYM. No. 10
ALTON: PARTITA FOR ORCH.
ENDELSSOHN: SYM. No. 4 "Italian"; HERBRIDES
OVERTURE

OZART:

SYM. No. 40 in G minor; SYM. No. 41 "Jupiter

HUBERT: SYM. No. 8 "Unfinished"
AYDN: SYM. No. 92
HUBERT: SYM. No. 7 "The Great C Major"
'RAUSS, J.: WALTZES & POLKAS

,$I
?R

RE CORDS
IPresents-
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
G. Szell, Cond.
:ETHOVEN: SYMPHONY No. 6 "Pastoral"
VORAK: SYMPHONY No. 2 in D minor

7=

r
R

i
i
I
i
i
.
r
5

4

9
V

AGNER:
TANN.

TRISTAN & ISOLDE; MEISTERSINGER;
(Excpt)

ETHOVEN: PIANO CON. No. 2 & 4 w/LEON FLEISHE
AHMS: PIANO CON. No. 2 w/LEON FLEISHER

w

USIC FOR FLUT:

w/MAURICE SHARP, FLUTIST

OZART:

CLAR. CON. w/MARCELLUS

RAUSS: HORN CON. w/M. BLOOM
KIEG: PIANO CON.
HUMANN: P. CON. w/FLEISHER
,et Us Help You Choose from Our Extensive
Selection of Cleveland Orchestra LP's.

MUSIC SHOP'

417 E. Liberty
Ph. NO 2-067.

Availabilit
OfHospital
Aids Nurses
By HELEN TUNISON
One of the main factors in the
excellence of the nursing school isI
its proximity to and cooperation
with the University Medical Cen-
ter, Mrs. Norma E. Marshall, as-
sistant to the nursing school dean,
said recently.
"Our nursing school is unique
in that it can work closely with a
large medical center on campus.
This gives the students an oppor-
tunity to work in a large hospital
while they complete their studies,"
she noted.
Nursing school faculty members
also hold positions on the medical
center staff. This brings close ties
between the two institutions.
"The nursing school compares
most favorably with other nurs-
ing schools in the United States,"
Mrs. Marshall said.
The four year program leads to
a degree of Bachelor of Science in
Nursing. It includes three summer
sessions with the last one before
the senior year.
The nursing school building,
which is only five years old, is al-
ready becoming crowded, she not-
ed. The freshman class numbers
267 and the school can only take
up to 300. Mrs. Marshall added
that there is no urgent need for
expansion at present but increas-
ing enrollment does call for plans
for future growth.
S"
t j~7
! f h

l
1
i
3
j
1
I
i
1
1

cU
..,... ':.. .:" .:Y ;{4y;{"..::",.o .,:i::"-.~i:"r":".Y:::":,;rr,

I

11

4

FAI
FRI. AND SAT.

- - - - - - . . ,,. -,z;

T To6T
NEW STYLES FIRST at WILD'S
A04
e~ *v
y *
REVERSIBLE UILT LINED F
JACKTS fom .1409

as:

eeti

g

TUESDAY, Nov. 12
4:15 or 7:15 P.M.
THE LEAGUE
Associate Sororities Invited

k

f

*

RUSHING REGISTRATION'
November 14. 15. 16... 9:00-5:00

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan