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November 07, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

't'1UKf 'J.JYat NOVEBEr~t R 7 .w,. 1983,,.

TTIiIALHUSDAY,NEMBE71963

I

GUYS & GALS-MEET YOUR PALS
RELAX THIS SEMESTER AT
THE COZY A O f f t Al

NCAA, AAU Continue Struggle for Power "'"PRCI

irs DiGravio

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RDS

FUN FOR
EVERYONE !
314 S. FOURTH AVE.

BILLAI

POCKET
BILLIARDS
SNOOKER
NO 8-9729

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963

WORLD'S FAIR

OPENING BY
PRESIDENT HATCHER

WASHINGTON ()-The Ama-
teur Athletic Union and the Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion, observing a cease-fire until
after the 1964 Olympics in Toyko,
resume their struggle for power at
the biennial meeting of the U.S.
Olympic Committee Sunday and
Monday.
This will be a political battle
for voting power which doesn't
figure to violate the directive of
Gen. Douglas MacArthur that
Utah State Tops
Total Offense
NEW YORK (P) - Utah State
continues to lead in total offense
and Nebraska in rushing offense
among the nation's major college
football teams.
However, statistics answered
yesterday by the NCAA Service
Bureau, point up the difference
in attacking styles between Texas,
the nation's top-ranked team, and
Baylor. The teams meet in Aus-
tin, Tex., Saturday.r
Baylor leads in passing offense
with 109 completions in 197 at-
tempts for a .553 average. The
Bears' passes have covered the
most yards, 1,410, and their 197
passes is more than any other
team except Tulsa, which has
tossed 207.
Texas, on the other hand, has
managed to get off 421 rushing
plays, more than any other major
outfit. The Longhorns, unbeaten
and untied, are ranked sixth in
rushing average with a 244.3 yards
per game average.

Y

neither group do anything to
hamper the development of the
best possible American team for
the Toyko Olympics Oct. 10-24,
1964.
Gen. MacArthur was appointed
by President Kennedy to arbitrate
the dispute between the two rival
groups. The main objective was
to permit athletes from all groups
to compete and prepare for the
Olympics. MacArthur has suc-
ceeded.
The battle in Washington will
be over a series of proposed
amendments. The most important
is an AAU-backed proposal to
give governing bodies of sports
affiliated with international fed-
erations the majority of votes in
the U.S. Olympic Committee. It
pertains to the 26 federations in-
volved in Olympic sports.
This actually is a rule of the
International OlympicrCommittee
which has not been observed by
the USOC in recent years. No
group has majority voting power
now.
These 26 groups have a total of
270 votes out of about 756. They
form the Class A group in the
USOC. This is the group which
must have majority voting power
according to IOC rules.
The NCAA, which has supported
groups seeking to unseat the AAU
as the international representa-
tive in several sports, is in Class
B along with the National Asso-
ciation of Intercollegiate Athletics,
the Army, Navy, Air Force and
Marines, and the equestrian body.
The NCAA has 100 votes and the
others 10 each.
There are many other organiza-

ivio u r caj

tions and college athletic confer-,
ences which are in separate classes
and have additional voting power.
Other controversial proposed
amendments include:
Permit President Kennedy to
name three citizens not affiliated
with any group to the USOC's
Board of Directors.
Give the NAIA, junior colleges
and high schools representation on
the various Olympic sports com-
mittees, including track and field,
basketball and swimming.
The AAU is the official repre-
sentative to nine of the 26 inter-
national federations connected
with the Olympics. The sports it

represents include basketball, box-
ing, bobsledding, gymnastics, judo,
track and field, swimming, wrest-
ling and weightlifting.
There are separate groups for
soccer, fencing, rowing, modern
pentathlon, shooting, ice hockey,
equestrian, archery, cycling, figure
skating, speedskating, skiing, ca-
noeing, field hockey, tennis, vol-
leyball and yachting.
The NCAA is supporting fed-
erations in track and field, bas-
ketball, gymnastics and some
other sports. These federations
seek to supplant the AAU as the
U.S. representative to the inter-
national federations.

By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING - Michigan
State rehearsed rushing the pass-
er in a workout yesterday.
Coach Duffy Daugherty showed
he was sincere when he termed
Purdue quarterback Ron DiGravio
about the most dangerous passer
in the conference.
"He's hard to rush," Daugherty
said. "He'll run around all day
before he gets rid of the ball."
Looking for Rollout
CHAMPAIGN-Dick Door, jun-
ior varsity quarterback, was the
marked man of Illinois' football
drills yesterday.
He imitated Michigan's Bob
Timberake on rollout pass or run
plays as the Illini sharpened their
defenses for the Wolverines Sat-
urday.
Power vs. Power
COLUMBUS-Ohio State drilled
yesterday on defense against quick
count plays, power runs and pass-

Boston Breezes by Cincy;
Pistons Snap Losing Streak

ing formation employed by Penn
State, Saturday's opponent here
in a regionally televised football
attraction.
On offense, Tom Barrington
worked at both right and left half-
back. Halfback Paul Warfield, re-
covering from a minor leg injury,
worked without pads, part of the
time on the new split-end duties
to which he may be assigned.
Back To Pass
BLOOMINGTON - Indiana's
football squad resurrected its al-
most abandoned passing attack
in a lengthy offensive drill yes-
terday.
Quarterbacks Rich Bader and
Frank Stravroff led the aerial re-
hearsal in preparation for the
Hoosiers' homecoming game with
Oregon State Saturday.
Indiana has completed only sev-
en of 24 pass attempts in its last
three games, compared with 41
connections in 69 tries during its
first three.

FRIDAY at 7 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

y f

By The Associated Press

X

I

KjlRIIIEG
WE SAVE

EXPERT
SHOE REPAIRING

Quick Service available on request

FILECCIA BROTHERS
1109 South University

BOSTON-The unbeaten Boston
Celtics breezed to their seventh
straight victory in the National
Basketball Association last night,
crushing the Cincinnati Royals,
139-121.
The win boosted Boston's East-
ern Division lead to three games
over the Royals.
Sam Jones scored 28 points to
Kramer Back
For Packers
GREEN BAY (IP)-Tight end
Ron Kramer ran without signs of
any trouble yesterday as the Green
Bay Packers got down to serious
work in preparation for Sunday's
National Football League meeting
with the Minnesota Vikings.
Kramer, who missed last Sun-
day's 33-14 victory over Pittsburgh
because of knee and ankle in-
juries, indicated he will be ready.
Quarterback Bart Starr, who
suffered a broken bone in his
right hand in St. Louis Oct. 20,
continued to work out while wear-
ing a splint to protect the injury.
Starr is scheduled to have the
hand examined later this week.

pace the Celtics, who led at half-
time 68-53. They hit on 31 of 55
shots. Seven Boston players scor-
ed in double figures.
Oscar Robertson led Cincinnati
with 24 points, while rookie Jerry
Lucas added 20 and picked off 19
rebounds, same as Boston's Bill
Russell.
DETROIT-The Detroit Pistons
ended a four-game losing streak
last night and at the same time
spoiled Philadelphia Coach Dolph
Schayes' return to an active play-
ing role as they rallied for a 119-
101 National Basketball Associa-
tion victory over the 76ers.
The victory, Detroit's second in
seven games, moved the Pistons
into fourth place past the Balti-
more Bullets in the NBA's Western
Division. The loss was Philadel-
phia's fourth straight and seventh
in nine outings.
Trailing by as many as 14 points
in the first quarter, the Pistons
caught fire midway in the second
period and led by Don Ohl and
Dave Debusschere closed the gap
to 57-55 by halftime.

GRID SELECTIONS.J
Your time is running out! If you are among the unfortunates
who have not yet won The Daily's fabulous Grid Picks contest, you
have only three more chances to try your luck.
Just think of it: honor, fame, glory, the praise and admiration
of your friends and loved ones, and two free tickets to the Michigan
Theatre, where "Mary, Mary" is now playing, can all be yours if you
win.
To enter, submit your selections to the Daily before 9 p.m. Friday.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

i

-M

SAM'S

STORE

LARGEST LEVI STOCK IN TOWN

1. MICHIGAN at Illinois (score)
2. Minnesota at Iowa
3. Michigan State at Purdue
4. Northwestern at Wisconsin
5. Penn State at Ohio State
6. Oregon State at Indiana
7. Dartmouth at Columbia
8. Princeton at Harvard
9. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame
10. Maryland at Navy

11. Clemson at North Carolina
12. Auburn at Miss. State
13. Georgia at Florida
14. Texas Christian at La. State.
15. Arkansas at Rice
16. Kansas at Nebraska
17. So. Methodist at Texas A&M
18. Baylor at Texas
19. UCLA at Air Force
20. California at Washington

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WESTERN DIVISION
W L Pct. GB
St. Louis 7 2 .778 --
San Francisco 4 2 .667 1Y3
x-Los Angeles 4 3 .571 22
Detroit 2 5 .286 42
Baltimore 2 7 .222 5
EASTERN DIVISION
W L Pct. GB
Boston 7 0 1.000 -
Cincinnati 6 5 .545 3
x-New York 3 6 .333 5
Philadelphia 2 7 .222 6
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 139, Cincinnati 121
St. Louis 112, Baltimore 110
Detroit 119, Philadelphia 101
x-New York at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAME
New York at San Francisco

SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

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