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November 05, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE CF.VF.V

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,1963 THE MJCHIE~AN DAILY PAEU' ~

rtlL k zTA

4

Elliott Commends Defense on HaltingCats'

Attack

WB"Probably the biggest reason Besides the defensive line and
Advocates of the old adage, "It why the secondary played as well backfield receiving praise, Elliott
?.N ' .=ttakes a good defense to stop a as it did, Elliott remarked, was commented on the defensive ends.
good offense," have recruited an- "They played a beautiful game.
a:: other ardent believer in Michi- because they were just playing Northwestern has been running
4}fgan's football coach Bump Elliott. wide all year, so they didn't sur-
"I think the whole team played prise up with those outside plays."
a real good ball game, especially The Wildcats junior halfback Dick
the defense," Elliott commented . . McCauley was injured in last
and then repeated his last three week's contest against Michigan
xwords. State so Northwestern ran their
Labelled as another test foi the senior speedster Willie Stinson.
L Michigan secondary, Tom Myers Stinson did most of the running
Northwestern's passing ace, found around the ends when he could,
paing fody but Wolverines Bill Laskey and
"_-. :: ' ,,',..- : > ...., the going rough most of the day. t, Jim Conley permitted him only
The Wolverine line continually nim n 1 carries.
aadsr nine yy sosn 4 ard int 1heardies
caught Myers behind the line ofr n
scrimmage beforehe even had an g No Interference
opportunity to look for his re- JAh One of the key plays in the
cyiers. Mersng wond peosng 4h4 .g. . defdefenseae occurfreinte sond perh-4
yards rusng. rn thodist's iod with Michigan ahead 7-0.
I Seondry tarsI Nrthesten dovedeep into Wol-
Myersy Thoweve, didy' copee a vadrbadofobl.R erine teiory mandeonird own x
11aofa20 passe fordu' RnD-1n2C7c, o yards, butph- Mes went forven tohdownay
the MGrr rohim Gaichian seecoary t reventhe pass.di tks o x indussileaed fote beally
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ed t padir tocomlet the23 ardpla Ealie n he ameperodHenEsninterepeApasseon thevialdcatr23 al r ie ntraed ior thend zonaef othefsecondlliM"tsoredThe"twotouchdown
gavE.himOfiveAfor hieso.eladsJim thneyltamswito30pinsscfoed.rterbcBbienpckdofou Timberlake ihgnpass dne rafotaloc63 yars. opa nta dfn a' ut elhte rnti

say is that it appears Rowser tim-
ed it perfectly and hit their end
just as he touched the ball. That
play sure helped us out of a hole."
Myers attempted another pass on
fourth down, but it too went in-
complete and Michigan took pos-
session of the ball.
Tallies Twice
End John Henderson scored
twice in the contest and Conley
once, with Henderson's two tallies
coming on some nifty running.
Elliott commented, "We always}
knew John was a pretty good run-
ner, he just hasn't had the op-
portunity to demonstrate it much
before this."

Henderson's first touchdown was
early in the second half when he
picked off one of Myers' aerials
and raced 23 yards to paydirt.
Henderson had been billed an
offensive specialist all year, but
Elliott corrected this. "Henderson
is used mostly on offense, but he
practices defense every day and
he's been in on defense in every
game this year."
Michigan's third score occurred
in the same period as Henderson
took a pass from quarterback Bob
Timberlake, side stepped two
Northwestern defenders, and raced
23 yards for the score. It ap-
Conley Catches
The Wolverines' final six points
came in the fourth period as Tim-
berlake combined with Conley for
a 23-yard pass play. Conley gi'ab-
bed the ball on his finger tips
and went in untouched. North-
western's Mike Buckner was de-
fending on the play and made no
effort to catch Conley. Elliott con-
cluded, "It appeared that Buck-
ner either thought Jim couldn't
reach the ball or that once he
did have it he would step out of
bounds as he was just straddling
the line."

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Officials Ask
For Changes
NEW YORK (P) - Cliff Mont-
gomery, captain of Columbia's
1933 Rose Bowl champions, said
:yesterday that Eastern college
football officials are preparing to
recommend that the goal posts be
restored to the goal line, side line
coaching be legalized and the sub-
stitution rule be changed.
Montgomery, an executive in
the international division of a'
publishing company, keeps his
hand in football by officiating on
weekends. He is a field judge.
"For the first time, as far as I
know, the officials are getting to-
gether to recommend s o m e
changes in the rules," Montgom-
ery told the members of the New
York football writers association.
"We are just getting our ideas
together but there seems to be a
strong feeling that tie goal posts
should be back on the goal lines.
Those new goose neck posts elim-
inate the possibility of injury. We
also think the substitution rule
should be changed a little so that
they can get one man in there at
any time.
SMontgomery said the officials
from the six Eastern chapters in
New, York, Syracuse, Boston,
Pittsburgh, Baltimore and Phila-
delphia would draw up recom-
mendations to be forwarded to
Asa Bushnell, Commissioner of the
Eastern College Athletic Confer-
ence. Bushnell, in turn, would be
asked to pass them on to the
rules committee of the NCAA for
consideration at its meeting in
January.

GRID SELECTIONS
John Krauskopf should be merry, merry as he was the winner of
last week's Grid Picks contest and received two free tickets to the
Michigan Theatre, which is currently showing "Mary, Mary."
John won with an impressive (to some) 17-3 record. We of
The Daily defy him to do it two weeks in a row.
Much thought, cogitation, consideration, deliberation, and skill-
full, experienced, premeditated guile went into the choosing of this
week's games, and upon examining them, you will agree that there
is little probability of skillfully deciding more than three or four
without the assistance of a coin.
So hurry to The Daily at 420 Maynard and fill out an official,
quasi-official, or non-official entry blank with your selections and
drop it into the battered, sickly gray box by 9 p.m. Friday,
If you are not sure that all of your picks are the best, and you
do not want to be recognized for fear of being ridiculed, feel free
to disguise yourself as anything intelligent enough to circle a winner.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

PITCHING FOR POWER:
Mets Deal Craig for Altman

NEW YORK () -- Encouraged
by their success in the trading
mart last year, the St. Louis
Cardinals pulled off another play-
er deal yesterday-their fifth in
less than 12 months-acquiring
pitcher Roger Craig from the New
York Mets in exchange for out-
fielder George Altman and minor
league pitcher Bill Wakefield.
The trade, first of any signifi-
cance since the close of the base-
ball season, was expected to bene-
fit both clubs. St. Louis, with the
best hitting club in the National
League, was beaten for the pen-
nant by the Los Angeles Dodgers

largely because of a pitching
shortage, Craig is expected to fill
that void, both as a starter and
reliever, He demonstrated he could
do both adequately last year de-
spite his 5-22 won and lost rec-
ord with the last place Mets.
New York was woefully weak
on attack last season. Altman is
in position to provide some of the
much-needed punch if he can re-
turn to the form that made him
one of the National League's most
respected batters before the Cards
acquired him from the Chicago
Cubs last winter.

The 30-year-old left-handed
slugger batted only .274 in 135
games with St. Louis in 1963. But
he hit .303 and .318 as a Cub
in 1961 and '62 respectively, driv-
ing in 170 runs with 49 home runs.
Wakefield, a 22-year-old hope-
ful, who attends Stanford Univer-
sity during the off-season, was
4-10 at Tulsa and Atlanta last
season but he comes well recom-
mended.

MICHIGRAS
E A
E S
T S
N 7:30 P.M.
SUN., NOV. 10
UNION BALLROOM

1. MICHIGAN at Illinois (score)
2. Minnesota at Iowa
3. Michigan State at Purdue
4. Northwestern at Wisconsin
5. Penn State at Ohio State
6. Oregon State at Indiana
7. Dartmouth at Columbia
8. Princeton at Harvard
9. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame
10. Maryland at Navy

11. Clemson at North Carolina
12. Auburn at Miss. State
13. Georgia at Florida
14. Texas Christian at La. State.
15. Arkansas at Rice
16. Kansas at ;Nebraska
17. So. Methodist at Texas A&M
18. Baylor at Texas
19. UCLA at Air Force
20. California at Washington

Vairs, 1

i.

Rugby Club
Triumphs
The Michigan Rugby Club de-
feated Wisconsin 13-3 Saturday.
Alan McLean scored twice for
Michigan and Doug Mead once.
A penalty kick accounted for the
lone Wisconsin score. The victory
brought the club's season record
to 1-1-2. Two games remain.

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near Michigan Theater

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6

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ECUMENICAL
FACULTY-GRAD LUNCHEON

I
r

t
t

TUESDAY, November 5th, 12:00
U.M. International Center
(Students 35 cents; others 50 cents)

SUBJECT:
SYMBOLS-EMPTY OR FULL

I

III

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