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November 01, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RR-BACTERIAL INFORMATION:
Studies Broaden Mendel's Discoveries

APTITUDE TEST:
Fricke Points Out
Benefits of Exam

ay STEVEN HALLER
e concepts of genetics
lly formulated by Gregor
1 have been enlarged and
ned by recent DNA deoxy-
cleic acid) studies of bac-
Prof. Rollin D. Hotchkiss
Rockefeller Institute said
ly.
aking on the topic "Listen-
i on Inter-Bacterial Infor-
a," Prof. Hotchkiss ex-
d that Mendel, considered
the "father of genetics,"
lated several ideas concern-
herited traits and the meth-

ods by which such traits are
transmitted from parent organ-7
isms to their progeny.
"Mendel described the way
units of inheritance (which he
called "genes") become associated
and arranged in pairs on what
are called "chromosomes". He
emphasized the rules of assort-
ment by which pairs of genes un-
ravel.
Gell Machinery
"Scientists today are not as
concerned with these aspects of
cell machinery as they are with
simpler kinds of chromosomes.

In bacteria, we can think of the
chromosomes as simple molecules;
in man, the arrangements are too
complex, and it is more accurate
to consider the chromosomes as
molecular a g g r e g a t e s," Prof.
Hotchkiss explained.
He added that when the link-
ages between genes break down,
this process occurs in regular
fashion according to recognizable
natural laws.
Prof. Hotchkiss noted that any
two DNA molecules are different
from one another, whether they
are from two separate species or

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.

,. _,
------ - -

;

WHAT IS
W j
"Whether in Asia or Africa, Europe or the Americas, the students'
road is hard, their needs critical. They can count on friends. O he
is WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE."
IF YOU ARE
--interested in knowing more about ASIA, AFRICA
and LATIN AMERICA . .
-wanting to DO SOMETHING to help others
help themselves
COME TO AN OPEN MEETING OF THE CSRO to:
-See the film, "Their Future Is Our Future," which
helps explain the World University Service.
-Form a permanent WUS COMMITTEE on the
University of Michigan campus.
7:15 p.m., Room 3529, Student Activities Building
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5

two cells from one specimen. Sep-
arate DNA molecules behave in-
dependently of each other, he
added.
Cell Nucleus
DNA bacterium resides in the
nucleus of .the single cell that
constitutes the organism. The
structure of this complex material
has been greatly publicized in re-
cent years, so that now many lay-
men as well as scientists are cog-
nizant of its makeup, Prof. Hotch-
kiss commented.
He des ribed the DNA molecule
as two chains of sugar phos-
phates, forming a double spiral
about each other and loosely con-
nected by the bases adenine,
guanine, thymine and cytosine.
Prof. Hotchkiss explained DNA's
role as a carrier of genetic "in-
formation" in terms of an analo-
gy between DNA and students. In
one form of information trans-I
fer, the necessary chemicals are
passed from one bacterium to an-
other in a highly organized fash-
ion.
Future Information
"Future information is passed
over later, but the first set of
hereditary information may be
neglected, much as a student
might forget earlier chapters of
a text after taking the mid-term
examination," he noted.
"Modemn laboratory techniques
can transfer DNA from a cell that
is resistant to a given drug to one
that is not. This 'robbing of Peter
to pay Paul' will transfer the
characteristic immunity to the
second cell. In so doing, the re-
searcher can hypothesize the
ways in which such transforma-
tions might come about in na-
ture," Prof. Hotchkiss said.
Although the' resistance (or
lack of it) that a bacterium shows
toward a certain chemical is an
important trait to the geneticist,
he is also interested in the bac-
terium's ability to cause fermen-
tation on particular sugars and
not others, the antigens that a
bacterium might form and the
response of bacteria to certain nu-
trients.
Prof. Hotchkiss also noted that
by heating DNA to special tem-
peratures between set extremes,
one can destroy- the activity of
certain gene-like molecules and
yet keep others fully active.

1

ROARING TWENTIES HOMECOMING-Reviewing the schedule
of events for the "weekend of weekends" on campus, these stu-
dents are contemplating what sort of entertainment, excitement
and just plain fun they will seek for Homecoming. The theme
this year is the "Roaring Twenties" bringing back memories and
events of the Universities first homecoming 40 years ago.
Homecoming Recreates
Roaringtwenties Era

*

(Continued from Page 1)
He further pointed out that
what he considers to be an ap-
parent duplication is an expensive
one. "If it is estimated that it
costs the typical candidate about
$20 to take the achievement tests,
and if there were about 300,000 of
them in 1962-63 (probably a con-
servative ,estimate), then the total
cost of $6 million becomes a figure
of some consequence."
After submission of the report,
and his statistics on the validity of
the exams, Prof. Fricke received
word from the CEEB: They refus-
ed to scrap the achievement tests,
or set up a neutral board bf test-'
ing experts to examine them -
,a compromise suggestion in the re-
port.
However, CEEB Executive Vice-
President Richard Pearson will be
in Ann Arbor late this month and
has asked to meet with Prof.
Fricke to discuss possible improve-
ments in the test.
Times Review
Fred Hechinger, education edi-
tor of The New York Times, re-
viewed the Fricke report, and
warned in his column last Sunday:
"Whatever the outcome, it is im-
portant that existing tests; be, ap-
praised critically and open-mind-
edly."
"The time to do this is now-
before the great new tide of appli-
cants. A year from now adds to
college admission pressures."
Inherent Fault
Prof. Fricke wrote in his report
to the CEEB that an important
reason why the achievement tests
cannot be "improved" is that they
inherently ,"tend to measure very
'few dimensions of consequence in
college success." s
"Non-academic elements" cru-
cial to academic achievement in
college are not measured by the
achievement tests, but are scien-

tifically measured by his own
OIAS exam, Prof. Fricke claimed.
The exam has been taken by
entering freshmen in all schools
of the University since 1957. Pop-
ularly known as the "raw carrots"
test, it measures several qualities
in a student: 1) academic motiva-
tion, 2) creative potential, 3) so-
cial acceptability, and 4) degree
of interest in the fields of busi-
ness, biological and physical sci-
ences, social sciences and human-
ities.
Defines Achiever
Further, the exam measures a
general quality possessed by "the
achiever personality," a score
which correlates highly with first-
year grade point averages of Uni-
versity students.
In his report to the CEEB, Prof.
Fricke wrote, "Many colleges in re-
cent years have been receiving
many more applications for admis-
sion from "ability-qualified' stu-
dents than they can admit.
"Accordingly thenadmissions of-
ficers ... have almost from neces-
sity made discriminations based
on procedures and data having lit-
tle or at least unknown validity.
Personality assessment is being
carried out.! The tools and thedata
may not be good--but they are
used."
Differentiation
Prof. Fricke explained that his
test was constructed on the basis
of a series of experiments which
separated those answers given by
students with high grade point
averages, and which given by less-
er achievers.
Among the data derived from
University students by Fricke's test
is evidence that those scoring high
increativity, but average or low in
academic motivation, tend to get
lower grade point averages than
those with average scores in both
creativity 'and academic motiva-
tion.

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1

(Continued from Page 1)

Losh of the astronomy depart-
ment.
The traditional "Yell Like
Hell" contest will begin at 8:30
p.m., and folliwing it is a "sur-
prise spectacular" fireworks dis-
play.
Additional Seats
Ready for Series
Five hundred additional seats
have been made available in the
front of Hill Aud.'s second build-
ing for the new Play Qf the Month
Series.
The four plays presented by the
Professional Theatre Program will
be "Brecht on Brecht," "The Hol-
low Crown," "A Man for All Sea-
sons," and "A Funny Thing Hap-
pened on the Way to the Forum."

Banded in the 1920's, a snake
dance beginning at 9:30 p.m. will
wind up the day's activities.
Tomorrow morning will begin
with a round of pre-game activi-
ties. First will be the eighth an-
nual tug-of-war betweenaGom-
berg and Taylor houses at 9:,15
a.m. in Island Park with the losers
ending up in the Huron River.
The annual Mud Bowl will be
played at 10 a.m. on the Sigma
Alpha Epsilon lawn. Competing
are SAE and Phi Delta Theta
fraternities. At this time the
Mud Bowl Queen will be chosen
from a field of gorgeous male con-
testants.
Next St. Bernard-drawn chariot
races will occupy the Diag for
the 10th consecutive Homecoming.
They will begin at 11 a.m.
At game halftime the Michigan
Marching Band, the Northwestern
Marching Band and the Michigan
Alumni Band twill perform.
Post-game features will include
an alumni-student coffee hour at
4 p.m. in the Union and "Little
Le Mans," a go-kart race at 4:30
p.m. at the Phi Kappa Psi house,
Climaxing the evening, Louis
Armstrong, famed entertainer of
the Twenties and of today, will
present a jazz concert at 8:30 p.m.
in Hill Aud.
At 10 p.m. two dances will be
held in the Union. The "Zug Island
All-Stars," Dick Tilken's band,
bathtub gin and a bubble machine
will end the "'63 Skidoo" era.

M
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Two University professors and
a Harvard University economist
discussed the future .of the na-
tion's economy before the 11th
annual Conference on the Eco-
nompic Outlook held yesterday.
Prof. Harvey E. Brazer of the
economics dept. told the confer-
ence that as long as Congressional
attention focuses strongly on a
balanced national budget, the out-
look for rational fiscal policy for
the nation remains dim.
Congressmen must understand
that "a balanced administrative

Econonists Predict Future
For U.S. fiscalProgram

"S

COME ONE, COME ALL

EVIL

GOOD

UNION JOCKS

DAILY GUYS

TO THE

FOURTH
BI ER

ANNUAL
BOWL

Ron 'Fearless'
Wilton

Ray 'The Rams
Rusnak

Bob 'Porky'
McKenzie

MICHIGAN DAILY
LIBELS
vs.
MICHIGAN UNION
UN DESI RABLES
TODAY

a fn fl

ii
II
I
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II

the inter-arts magazine
NOW CONSIDERING
FOR PUBLICATION
IN THE
DECEMBER ISSUE:
ART

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Another speaker, Prof. Eva L.
Mueller of the Survey Research
Center, claimed that stimulation
in the form of atax cut Orin-
creased investment activity will be
needed in 1964 to keep the econ-
omy rising.
She predicted a slowly rising
level of consumer spending in the
first half of 1964.
"The moderately optimistic state
of consumer confidence, therising
rate of personal incomes and the
currently rising marriage rate all
point in that direction," Prof.
Mueller said.
GNP Rise
A third speaker, 'Prof. John
Lintner of Harvard University,
predicted that the Gross National
Product will pass the $600 billion
mark and move into the $605-608
billion range in the first half of
1964.
He claimed that the economy
would make this record whether
or not the administration's bill
for tax reduction is passed.
He added that if the tax cut
is permanently sidetracked the an-
nual total for GNP for 1964 will
be at about the $605-608 billion
level, industrial production and
corporate profits would be lower
and unemployment rates would be
higher.
Tax Cuts
Prof. Lintner predicted that if
the present proposed tax reduc-
tions are passed by March and
retroactive to Jan. 1, then the
economy will expand vigorously
throughout the year.
If the tax bill is further delayed,
he continued, but still passed in
the second quarter and effective
July 1, unemployment would de-
crease and a small increase in
corporate profits and capital
spending within the year would

Gerry 'Good Heart'
Storch

budget has no particular value in
the. context of the operation of the
economy as a whole," he asserted.
Deficit Concerz
The current Congressional con-
cern on the size of the budget
deficit, Prof. Brazer continued,
makes it difficult to achieve a
fiscal policy to meet the needs of
an economy that has failed for
six years to gain anything ap-
proaching full employment.
Prof. Brazer, recently returned
from serving two years as Deputy
assistant Secretary of the Treas-
ury, told the conference that the
administration, in asking for'. a
tax reduction, has promised "the
most. prudent possible policy of
expenditures."
The price, in terms of curtail-
ing expanditures must be paid
before delivery of tax reduction,
Prof. Brazed said. "But included in
th eprice may have to be desirable
expansion of federal programs.
The possibility that fiscal policy
will, in the short run, be defla-
tionary rather than expansionary
must also be considered."
Stimulus Needed

m m y
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