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October 31, 1963 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER.31,1963

THE MICHIGAN BAIt A THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31. 1963

Expect $10 Million Rise DENTAL SCHOOL:
In School Appropriation Mann Explains Need for New Buildings

Cites Bio-Engineering Growth

r'

(Continued from Page 1)

only a $5 million increase. This
could then be matched by the pub-
lic institutions through their tui-
tion hikes, these sources disclosed.
The prospects for a tuition in-
crease drew sharp criticism from
State Superintendent of Public
Instruction Lynn M. Bartlett. "We
are running the risk in Michigan
of forcing the costs of higher edu-
cation too high and pricing com-
petent students out of the mar-
ket," he asserted.
He explained that when the
last tuition hikes of the public
institutions were enacted for Sep-
tember, 1962, it was his feeling
that most of the college boards,
including the Regents and the
state board of education "made
these increases with great reluc-
tance."
Ex-Officio Member
Bartlett sits ex-officio on the
Regents and is one of four voting
members 'of the state board. The
state board currently has direct
control over four of the 10 public
institutions and voted the tuition
hikes for 1962 at these schools.
When these hikes were decided
upon, he said, the understanding
was made that "these were to be
the last hikes for a long time."
Executive members of the ad-
ministration and members of the
Regents were unavailable for com-
ment.
)Bartlett To Veto
In the case where the $5 mil-
lion matching plans were passed
by the Legislature, Bartlett ex-
pressed his intention to vote

(Continued from Page 1)
tal equipment in the last four or
five years, Dean Mann explained.
The very latest equipment will be
provided in the new building.
"Expanded clinical areas would
also enable the school to give
students training in the now wide-
spread use of dental assistants, in
keeping with the latest trends in
the profession," he commented.
The present building plans call
for a 4-story structure just north
of the present dentistry building,
an 8-story tower to the east of it
and a 2-story "bridge" on the site
of the present building to connect
the tower with the existing Kel-
logg Institute.
Integrated with Campus
The whole would be integrated
with the Central Campus Plan as
a sub-campus area, and a parking
structure would be provided be-
hind this complex in the space
now occupied by the Temporary
Classroom Building. If the con-
struction appropriations are made
at the next session of the Legis-
lature, Dean Mann estimated that
the building construction would be
begun in 1965 and completed in
1968.
To correlate with an expansion
into the new structures, Dean
Mann explained that a curriculum
committee is now reviewing the
broad goals of the dental school
programs along with the course
distributions in each.
Further, a teaching committee
is exploring new methods of

teaching presentation that could!
be used.
One new teaching concept that
is being planned for use in the new
building is closed-circuit televi-
sion. "The Medical Center has
been using television for some
time now, but it is impossible to
make use of this in our present
structure," Dean Mann explained.
He added that television allows
great flexibility in allowing large
groups to watch intricate demon-
strations as easily as groups of
only two or three.
An especially prominent feature
of the planned $10 million build-

ing would be a large new library
housed in the "bridge" facing
North University.
"The dental school has one of
the better library collections in
the country, and with such a long
history (since 1875) the literature
is substantial. The present library
is wholly inadequate to make this
collection readily available and
usable by students and faculty,"
Dean Mann stated.
Michigan ranks ahead of only
two Midwest states in the popula-
tion per dentist, Ohio and
Indiana.

7;

4

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t

LYNN BARTLETT
. . . opposes tuition hike

DEAN GLENN V. EDMONSON
... bio-engineering
program complementary research
is required.
According to Dean Edmonson,
the range of research is shown
by such projects as a University
hydraulics civil engineer doing re-
search on the cardiovascular sys-
tem with a physiologist and a sur-
geon.
Some mechanical engineers at
the University have been doing
research in orthetics and pros-
thetics for a number of years, and
hospital management problems
have been studied by industrial
engineers.
Also, chemical . engineers are
studying the chemical processes
as they relate to the physiological
system and the bacteriological
problems of food processing and
drug manufacturing.
Among other opportunities
opening up, Edmonson saw "prob-
lems associated with increasingly
acute environmental conditions
caused by air and water pollu-
tants. These will be solved when
the bio-engineer, the atmospheric
scientist and the biologist pool
their talents."
Library Exhibits
Indian War Relics
An exhibition of original source
material on Pontiac's War, 1763-4,
is being shown in the Clements
Library, and will continue through
December. Pontiac's War, an In-
dian revolt of 200 years ago, began
after the Seven Years' War and
centered in Detroit.
Frank Kuntz
and his
Ragtime Piano
YOUR FAVORITE
DRINK
PIZZA
Del Rio Bar
122 W. Washington
NO 2-9575

against tuition hikes at the four
schools currently under the state
board's control.
However, he explained the new
constitution going into effect in
January has not been clear about
who would have the direct govern-
ing authority over these four.
Although the board will con-
tinue to operate until January,I
1965, the governor is charged with
appointing autonomous governing
boards for these institutions.
The question of who will decide
on such matters as tuition in-
creases is being considered by the
attorney general, Bartlett said.

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