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October 30, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-30

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TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Kennedy Wins Committee Fight

Missiles Guard Florida Coast

For

Moderate Civil Rights

Bill

VATICAN COUNCIL:,
Theologians To Revise
Mary's Role in Church

VATICAN CITY (M)-The Vati-
can Ecumenical Council decided
yesterday to consider a theologi-
cal topic about the Virgin Mary
within a document concerningthe
Roman. Catholic Church as a
whole, rather than give her the
emphasis of a special study.
The vote was close, 1,114 to 1,-
074.
The Council's theological com-
mission now will have to revise the
Marian topic, or Schema, to fit
consideration of the Virgin's place
in Catholic theology into the broad
scheme on the nature of the
Church, "De Ecclesia."
Council fathers insisted their
action did not downgrade the
Mother of Christ. But the decision
in St. Peter's Basilica was clearly
a chgange in Council handling of
theological topics and could affect
Catholicism's relations with other
Christians in a quest for unity.
Protestants often have criticized
the Roman Catholic emphasis on
Mary. .
New Concept
"The Marian Document is now
to become part of a Christ-center-
ed concept of the Church," the
Rev. Bernard Haring, a German
Redemptorist priest, said. One of
the most respected Catholic theol-
ogians, Father Haring said the de-
cision "gets away from a depart-
mentalization in which you have

Christ, the Church and Mary, in
favor of a concept in which you
have Christ and His Church, with-
in which is Mary."
"Many speakers had argued that
devoting a full and separate sche-
ma to Mary would only rankle
other Christiansand reinforce
what some speakers considered to
be a distorted emphasis on the
Madonna in parts of the Catholic
world.
The vote alters nothing within
the four-chapter "De Ecclesia" as
it now stands. It cuts down the
total number of schemata for
Council action from 17 to 16 by
eliminating the Marian Schema.
Too Soon To Know
Council experts said it was too
early to tell whether the chapter
on Mary will be ready for dis-
cussion before the Council recesses
Dec. 4.
It will be up to the theology
commission to decide which draft,
if any, will find, its way into "De
Ecclesia" as the new chapter on
Mary.
Inyanticipation of the vote, the
British and the Chilean hierar-
chies made suggested drafts weeks
ago of how the new Marian chap-
ter might be phrased. Each
stresses the Biblical roots of
Catholic doctrine and devotion
concerning Mary. There also is a
French entry.

CHARLES HALLECK ROBERT F. KENNEDY
. ..,congratulations were the order of the day
ALGERIAN-MOROCCO WAR:
Keita, Selassie Mediate
Aft 'Summit' Conference

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It is a pleasant feeling
to have your own
Christmas Cards ordered.
Why don't you select
yours now, and avoid
the crowds later.
JOHN B. LEIDY

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BAMAKO, Mali (M~-A confer-V
ence aimed at settling the Alger-
ian-Morocco border war began
yesterday with Mali President Mo-
dibo Keita and Ethiopian Emperor
Haile Selassie acting as mediators.
Keita and Selassie met separ-
ately with Algerian President Ah-
med Ben Bella and King Hassan
II of Morocco. However, Ben Bella
Bill To Limit
Chiefs' Terms
Goes to House
WASHINGTON (P)-The House
Armed Services Committee, unde-
terred by the opposition of the
White House, approved 22 to 8
yesterday a bill setting. a single
four-year term for members of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
The bill now goes to the House.
The approval overrode a warn-
ing from Rep. Samuel Stratton
(D-NY) that it is "a bad bill, a
hasty bill, and a dangerous bill."
Stratton charged that the com-
mittee chairman, 79-year-old Rep.
Carl Vinson (D-Ga) had introduc-
ed the legislation because Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy did not
reappoint Adm. George W. Ander-
son to another two-year term as
chief of naval operations.
Vinson denied this.
"It was not prompted by the
failure to reappoint Anderson," he
said. "In fact . . . I never would
have appointed him in the first
place . . . ," he said.
Under present laws, the Presi-
dent usually appoints a chief for
two years and may reappoint him
again. Vinson's bill would set a
four-year term with no reappoint-
ment.

and King Hassan did not meet
face to face. Keita and Selassie
met them privately in separate
apartments in the white presiden-
tial palace.
A Mali government spokesman
said he was "fully optimistic" that
the talks would end the border
clashes and bring peace to the
troubled Algerian-Morocco border.
Problem of Protocol
A 'spokesman for the Algerian
delegation said the maui problem
of getting Ben Bella and King
Hassan together wasone"of pro-
tocol. He said the two camps could
not agree on exactly how the two
leaders would meet face-to-face.
The four leaders will seek to
achieve at least a cease-fire in
the two-week-old conflict in which
Algerian and Moroccan armed
forces have been fighting for dis-
puted mineral-rich areas along
the undefined border of south-
eastern Morocco and southwestern
Algeria.
Western diplomats in North Af-
rica expressed doubt the confer-
ence would settle the border dis-
pute but said they hoped it would
work out a cease-fire. The diplo-
mats have expressed fear the con-
flict might blossom into a tense
East-West issue because of re-
ports that the Algerians had re-
ceived Soviet tanks and jet fight-
ers shipped from Cuba.
Hopes High
Africans, too, were hoping for a
successful conference. The talks
represent a major test for the
principle of African unity, adopted
May 1 at the conference of Afri-
can nations in Addis Ababa, Ethi-
opia.
Failure of the meeting would
represent a serious blow to the
Organization of African Unity,
which was organized at the Addis
Ababa meeting. .

Major Items
To Remain
In Measure
President Calls Result
'Fair, Comprehensive'
WASHINGTON (P)-The Ken-
nedy administration won its ap-
peal yesterday for House Judiciary
Committee approval of a compro-
mise civil rights bill.
President John F. Kennedy
termed the measure comprehensive
and fair.
The committee, with a bipar-
tisan coalition in control, rejected
a sweeping measure drafted by a
subcommittee and voted to accept
instead a more moderate bill back-
ed by House leaders of both par-
ties.
Included in the compromise are
controversial proposals to ban ra-
cial discrimination in places of
public accommodation and to cre-
ate a Federal Fair Employment
Practices Commission.
Will Report Soon
The judiciary committee is ex-
pected to draft a report on the
bill during the next. week or 10
days and send it to the rules com-
mittee, where another week prob-
ably will be needed to clear the
measure for House action.
The President said in a state-
ment that the agreement "has
significantly improved prospects
for enactment of effective civil
rights legislation in Congress this
year."
He added:
"The bill is a comprehensive
and fair bill. It will provide effec-
tive legal remedies for racial dis-
crimination in voting, education,
public accommodations, employ-
ment and federal programs. It will
provide the basis for men of good
will in every city of our land to
work together to resolve their ra-
cial problems within the frame-
work of law and justice.
Rules Committee Next
"The bill must now pass through
the House Rules Committee, be
approved by the House, then by
the Senate.
"I am hopeful this can be done
as rapidly as possible."
The President's brother, Atty.
Gen: Robert F. Kennedy, said in
a statement that without GOP
backing in the House "the possi-
bility of civil rights legislation in
Congress would have been remote."
."If it hadn't been for the active
interest and willingness of the Re-
publicans as represented by Con-
gressman McCulloch and through
him by Congressman Halleck,"
Kennedy added, "we certainly
would not be able to have obtained
passage of the bill through the
committee."
Rep. William M. McCulloch of
Ohio is senior Republican on the
judiciary committee and Rep.
Charles A. Halleck of Indiana is
the Republican floor leader.

-Associated Press
U.S. HAWK ANTI-AIRCRAFT MISSILES at Key West, Fla., defend against possible attack from the
Caribbean Sea area. The missiles were installed in October of last year, during the Cuban crisis, and
have since become permanent. They are a part of a large-scale defense buildup in the South Florida
area.

SENATE:
Commence
Aid Battle
WASHINGTON (MP)-The annual
Senate floor fight over foreign aid
gathered steam yesterday as Sen.
Wayne Morse (D-Ore) tossed in
the first batch of proposed amend-
ments and announced he had more
to come.
Senate Republican Leader Ever-
ett M! Dirksen of Illinois told a
news conference he expects some-
thing like 40 amendments to be
offered, since- 4he Senate Foreign
Relations Committee restored so
many House cuts.
Morse, Sens. Ernest Gruening
(D-Alaska) and Allen J. Ellender
(D-La), among others, will de-
mand roll calls on about half of
them, Dirksen predicted. He said
the debate should extend at least
until next week.
GOP Consideration
The aid bill was discussed at a
GOP policy luncheon, but no at-
tempt was made to reach a party
decision, Dirksen toldnewsmen,
adding he couldn't spell out a
pattern on which the Senate would
act.
He said in his own opinion "the
whole program should be reassess-
ed." Dirksen estimated that in the
past authorization programs have
been reduced an average of $200
million while appropriations for
foreign aid have brought final
money figures an average of .$I
billion below presidential requests.
A major amendment proposed
by Morse would ban aid to any
military junta-imposed govern-
ment unless the President deter-
mines withholding it would be
contrary to. the national interest
and he gets advance congressional
approval for continuing it.
Humphrey Approves
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey of
Minnesota, the assistant Demo-
cratic leader, told the Senate this
proposal merits favorable con-
sideration. He made the point in
stressing that his approval of the
$4.2-billion administration meas-
ure does not mean he gives "carte
blanche approval" of the way it
came from the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee.
Humphrey disclosed before yes-
terday's Senate session that he
had asked Foreign Aid Director
David E. Bell to prepare a specific
proposal for reorganizing the aid
program.
Humphrey told a news confer-
ence he was acting to provide
"insurance" against efforts to halt
the program.

.;

Hlw would you like to win a
free dinner for -you and your dale
AT__
The Michigan Union is looking for a new name
for its'dining room and it needs your help. All
you need to do is to send your suggestien to:
DINING ROOM
STUDENT OFFICES
MICHIGAN UNION

Hofbrau Haus
(Old Schwaben Inn)
215 S. Ashley
COEDNIGHTS
WEDNESDAYS
BEGINNING Oct. 30
9:30-10:30 P.M.

ENTERTAINMENT
Will roll out the barrel

HAL BERGtR AT ORGAN
Will have a barrel of fun!

See you there-Your Host: Eric Teller

Phone NO 8-6779

0 601 East Liberty

Student Organizations
NEED IMON E'Y?.
Announces
Petitioning
for Sponsorships
Spring 1964
Pick up forms through SGC office in S.A.B.
PETITIONS MUST BE RETURNED
TO CINEMA GUILD BY NOV. 11
Judy Berry, in charge of sponsorships

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP-

Sorry, our mistake ,.
the lecture by the
Noted Author and Lecturer
WALTER J ONG, S.J.
on
"Rhetoric, Commonplaces and
Shakespeare"
will be heldo
NEXT TUESDAY, NOV.5
Auditorium "A" Angell Hall
4:10 P.M.

UN InvestigatorsMove to Hue

/

By The Associated Press
SAIGON-A United Nations in-
vestigation of South Viet Nam's
political-religious crisis expands
today to Hue, where 11 persons
were killed in the first violence
May 8 during a Buddhist demon-
stration.
WASHINGTON-The Kennedy
administration asked for a $6-
billion hike in borrowing authority
yesterday, but at the same time
said the prospective deficit is al-
most $3 billion less than had been
feared.

>4
4
_4
4
4

WOLVERINE CLUB PRESENTS
Student Air Charters
to NEW YORK
on UNITED AIRLINES
"THANKSGIVING VACATION"
Leave Nov. 27...........................Return Dec. 1
"CHRISTMAS VACATION"
Flt. No. 1-Leave Dec. 20.................. Return Jan. 12
Fit. No. 2-Leave Dec. 21........ . .. ..Return Jan. 12

There was every indication, how-
ever, that the Treasury will have
to settle for a lower national debt
ceiling than the $315 billion rec-
ommended to the House Ways and
Means Committee by Secretary of
the Treasury Douglas Dillon. The
ceiling, now $309 billion, drops
automatically to $285 million Nov.
30 unless Congress acts.
* * *
SAO PAULO-About 35 per cent
of Sao Paulo's 700,000-man indus-
trial labor force struck yesterday
to enforce demands for a single
labor-management contract cov-
ering 74 union locals instead of
separate contracts.
Management representatives
have refused even to consider the
idea of what they call a global
contract, insisting that each union
continue to negotiate its own ac-
cords.
TOKYO-A Japanese newspa-
per correspondent reported yester-
day that almost all factories in
Red China's northeast industrial
regions are being operated 24
hours a day.
ACCRA-Ghana called yester-
day for establishment of a unified
military command of African na-
tions to plan immediate liberation
of dependent African states.

WASHINGTON - Hearings on
President John F. Kennedy's pro-
posal for health care of the aged
and related matters will begin Nov.
18, the House Ways and Means
Committee announced yesterday.
* * -*

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