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October 15, 1963 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15. x.962'

TUEMIHIAN AIY uESDAY .w OCTa u"AuLY zI 1&a J

0

student Unit
)ffers Trips,
t Low Cost,
By ROBERT SHLIFER
The United States National Stu-
ent Association, for the sixteenth
ear, will provide low cost cul-
iral and educational foreign
avel programs next summer.
USNSA programs are open to
1 students attending U.S. col-
ges and universities between the
ges of 18 and 25 and to high
1hool students entering college in
ie fall.
Countries
Some of the countries USNSA
rovides tours through are: Eng-
,nd, France, Holland, Italy,
pain, Germany, Austria, Switzer-
nd, Belgium, Luxembourg, Scot-
,nd, Norway, Sweden, Denmark,
reece, Israel, Turkey, Finland,
oland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia,
nd USSR..
Depending on the tour and sec-
on you take, the group size
)nges from 20-35. Each group is.
rovided with a professional guide.
In addition to the arranged
ghtseeing tours, plenty of free
me is scheduled in each country.
Each tour is divided into one to
tree sections. The sections are
lentical except for time of de-
arture.
Tour Cost
The cost of the tours range from
510-$895. This is exclusive of
-ansportation costs to the start-
g point and from the point of
eparture. Depending on what
nd of accommodations are se-
ared, ,transportation costs, one-
ay, by steamship can range from
182-$230. It is also possible to fly
the destination.
Other tours sponsored by US-
SA are the Bicycling and Hos-
ling tour, the Work Camp-Trav-
. program, the Teen tour (for
igh school students), the Ford-
am University Wayfarer tour, and
pring Vacation in Bermuda.
In addition to these, USNSA
tudy-Travel programs are avail-
ble. Each USNSA tour lasts from
5-55 days.

SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES:
Work Abroad Program Solves 'Equation

See and drive the arrogant Jaguar XK-E

j

4

By DAVID WHITE

Anyone wishing to work abroad
must believe: Life=(Knowledge=
Philosophy + Psychology through
Experience).
In other words, there is not
much money abroad, if wages are
judged by American standards.
This does not even aspire to rele-
gating the equation to a secondary
position, rather the equation is to
be elevated on its own merits.
The practical minded young uni-
versity student, of which there
seems to be a plurality, has buried
the all-truth (only 12 University
students worked abroad last sum-
mer).
The best opportunities for ful-
fillment of the purpose, gained

through a summer abroad, exist in
Lisle, says its director and found-
er, Dewitt Baldwin, who is also di-
rector of the Office of Religious
Affairs. Lisle is described as the
opportunity for the young adult to
learn and experience in a foreign
nation.
Lisle's purpose, according to its
founder, is to develop "sensible
human relations." Lofty though it
is, Lisle draws upon the whole
world to share in the experiences
it offers.
It requires an "able student"
who "thinks for himself," and is
"emotionally mature." Assumed is
a belief in the pervasive equation.
Lisle is a six weeks' exercise in
work, thought and people; and in

the integration of those ideals.
Operating on the base of a group
of 25 persons, Lisle members draw
on the diverse and obscure nature
of its environment.
Group Mediator
The group's mediator, with a
connotation that is only to give
knowledge, is usually a sociologist
of the group's religion.
Week one is orientation, planned
so that the groupcan get to know
its Id and make contact. From
this base, Lisle spreads out into
factories, farms, hotels, and more
to seek the absolute.
One week is spent working in a
factory, and living with possibly a
university professor. The next on
a farm with a rural family. A to-

tal of four such changes are made
throughout the summer, each de-
signed to identify the nature of
Life.
Between each field situation, the
group compares findings with its
goal of knowledge.
Opportunities abound. Nights
are spent in communication; much
can be learned from conflicting
and different beliefs.
International
Lisle goes to Europe, Latin
America, California, and the So-
viet Union. The groups are in-
ternational in composition, with
one group consisting of a maxi-
mum number of nationalities.
One Lisle alumnus commented,
"After my Lisle experience no peo-
ple will ever seem strange and no
place far away."
The Lisle prospectus proclaims,
young adults "discover living per-
sons." Baldwin pointed out the
fact that the experience can be
related to the person. He called
it an opportunity to "adjust to
new situations, to develop flexibil-
ity."
Cost varies with the charge for
transportation to the chosen na-
tion. The variance is from $250-
$750. To the participating stu-
dents, the cost is not prohibitive,
as knowledge exists.
Other Agencies
Besides Lisle, many agencies can
effect a profitable summer for the
true student. The University's
Placement Office has access to all
these programs.
In past summers, jobs have been
held as life guards, nurses, con-
struction w o r k e r s, chauffeurs,
yacht crewmen, models (sixes 12-
14), and factory workers and more.
Fifty nations were visited in the
quest for self-knowledge.
A case in point is that of a stu-
dent who became a forester in the
dinner he had soup and water; the
Bavarian Alps for a summer. For
meals were poor. Having spent all
his money on food, little was left
for enjoyment after the job was
completed. He believes that every
person should experience sleeping
on a doorstep while awaiting con-
firmation of his jet ticket.
The knowledge is there; 12 Uni-
versity students sought it last sum-
mer.

This car creates a sensation wherever it goes. And no wonder. It is sleek ... aerodynami.
cally designed .. capable of 150 miles an hour. It features monocoque construction,
has disc brakes and independent suspension on all four wheels, Gran Turismo coupe
(above) or open sports model with interchangeable soft or hard top. For an unforgettable
experience, see and drive this arrogant beauty.
Overseas Imported Cars, Inc.
331 South 4th Ave.

2319
DIPLOMA

Choose a Charnt
to briiig back
; memories as the
years go by...
Select from our 'wide
collection of

1803
COCKTAIL GLASS
and CHERRY

2053
GRAND PIANO

I

HIT PARADE-"So long, for a while," coo these hit paraders of college fashions. Ready to speed
across the seas to trade in their old Jaguar on a newer model, these models epitomize all that is right in
campus style. See if you can identify their clothes by name.

TELEPHONE

14K GOLD & STERLING

C

IHIARkMS

Engraving done at no extra charge
San e-.Day service on request

RG Py
0.0
*N 'QQ pS
DAP
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14

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arcade jewelry shop
16 NICKELS ARCADE

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Sensational
Sweaters

AUSTIN
DIAMOND
CORPORATION

1209 South U.

663-7151

Its

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529E.Liberty z

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Shaggy mohairs,
100% imp orted
lamb's wool
-necks
Sizes: 36-46
COLORS
charcoal gre y
bankers grey
olive
charcoal brown
blue
black

go

S"99 m $1995

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