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August 27, 1963 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

action Displays

Construct Music School

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS:
Scholars Join for Area Studi

I, Artistic I
terns Collection of Musical
ents shows musical in-
ts as an art form.
collection, housed on the
floor of Hill Aud., shows
ents of Renaissance Eu-

nstrurnents

PROF. PHILIP A. DUEY
...glee club

Choral'Groups
Sing in State,
Nation, World
The Michigan Men's Glee Club;
and the Michigan Singers are two
of the University's best known
choral groups.
T The Glee Club, the second oldest
college club in the United States,
has toured most of the country,
and parts of Europe. Prof. Phillip
A. Duey of the music school directs
the 75 member group. Students;
from any school are eligible to
try out. Each fall, 25 new members
are selected. The group rehearses
each. Thursday and Sunday.
Last fall, the Glee Club gave,
joint concerts with the Ohio State,
and Michigan' State University;
glee clubs when the football team
travels to those schools. A third
joint concert with the Wisconsin
singers will be held when the,
Badgers come to Ann Arbor. A
spring tour through the Southwest
is tentatively planned.
The 80-voice Michigan Singers
is a selected mixed choral group
under the University Choirs. It
specializes in specific repertory
and gives credit to all students of
sophomore standing and above,
although freshmen may partici-.
pate. The group rehearses five
days a week and conducts a con-
cert tour each spring.
Prof. Maynard Klein, well known
festival choir conductor and direc-
tor of choirs at the National Mu-
sic Camp since 1943, directs the
Singers.

rope and the Far East when they
had more than just a functional
use.
The collection includes colorful
ancestors of guitars with many
layers of woodcarvings, highly
decorated and ornate instruments
of 17th and 18th century France
and Italy and strange instruments
of the Far East.-
'Hard to Find'
"Some instruments in the col-
lection are. hard to find in their
.native countries today," collection
curator Prof. Robert Warner of
the music school noted.
"We use some of the instruments
in our consorts," William Hettrick,
assistant curator, added. The con-
sorts, directed by Prof. Warner,
are presented by faculty and stu-
dents who play medieval and Ren-
aissance melodies. Their composi-
tions use viols and voice, the viols
being six- and seven-stringed ih-
struments shaped like violins, but
not closely related to them.
An 18th century Italian viol -
the Viola d'Amore-is on display.
Hettrick noted its "tremendous
resonance" made possible by
strings that vibrate when other
strings are played.
Tiny Violins
Also shown are several tiny
violins used by dancing masters
in the 17th Century. The master
would take the tiny violin out of
his pocket and use it in conducting
an orchestra..
In former centuries there were
many freak instruments, Hettrick
remarked. One such instrument on
display is a 19th Century cane
clarinet. The idea was that a man
taking awaik might get an urge
to play a tune. If he had his cane
clarinet, he could stop and play.
A French violin on display has
the carved head of a man with a
handsome beard. Some of the in-
struments have had painting and
many have intricate design work.
Tuba Ancestor.
Among the instruments is a
French musical serpent, an an-
cestor of the tuba, used first in
churches. An ophicheide from
Spain is serpent-headed and was
used for its terrifying effect.
An old French horn on display
has a movable mouthpiece. By
changing the location of the
mouthpiece, the musician could
get different effects.
Beetle-shaped lutes of great
craftsmanship as the terobo of
17th Century Italy are on display.
So are oliphants, intricately carv-
ed tusks that played one note as
well as the ancestor of the clar-
inet-the single-reed zummarah of
Egypt.
Also in the collection is a hurdy-
gurdy from France. The instru-
ment, Hettrick explained, was used
by kings in some periods and beg-
gars in others. Basically, it was
a pastoral instrument. The one on
display has a head of a man with
a broad mustache on it.

The five area study centers at
the University offer scholars more
fully developed interdisciplinary
programs in Russian, Far Eastern,
Southeast Asian, Near Eastern,
and Japanese studies.
The functions of these area stu-
dies is to channel financial aid
in the forms of fellowships,
scholarships and grants to stu-
dents wishing to concentrate their
studies in these areas, to develop
library facilities in their respective
fields, and to coordinate the ef-
forts of scholars at the Universityt
whose interests lie in the same
areas.
Through the centers the Uni-'
versity is aiming to provide facili-
ties so that more Americans can
gain a deeper and more thorough
understanding of these areas
which have become critically im-
portant to our nation's welfare.
First Center
The Center for Japanese Studies
was the first center established?
and the systems and methods used
were largely experimental.
The other four centers were
established two years ago and they
are organized very similarly to
the Center for Japanese Studies.
For example, professors in the,
anthropology, economics, geo-,
graphy, history, fine arts, political
science and sociology departments
who are particularly concerned,
with how their field of study ap-
plies in Southeast Asia are mem-
bers of the Center far Southeast
Asian Studies as well as of their
own departments. The student may
work for a masters' or doctors' de-
gree in any of these departments
with emphasis on Southeast Asia.
Extend Studies
These area centers are designed
primarily to offer training to grad-
uate students, since their programs

Students Show Experime
( A =

UNDER CONSTRUCTION-The long-awaited music school building is now being built on North
Campus and should be completed by next fall. The structure will relieve crowded conditions in the
school which is currently scattered in 13 buildings around campus, many of them old and delapidated.
TRADITION CONTINUES:
Society Puts on G&S Operettas

One act plays, presented in the
Arena or Trueblood theatres six
times a semester during the after-
noon, have been gaining more and
more popularity with the Univer-
sity crowd lately.
Presented by the Laboratory
Playbill as experimental produc-
tions, the plays are free of charge
and are financed by the Univer-
sity Players' major productions of
the year. The programs are com-
pletely produced, .directed, and
staffed by University students.
Diverse-Plays
The students, in selecting such
diverse offerings as a medieval
pageant and three plays by Ed-
ward 'Albee during the last year,
are seen as more liberal and "radi-
cal" in their choice of plays than
the faculty members who direct
the regular playbill.
The plays range from modern,
experimental plays with limited

plot and maximum theatrical
feet to medieval plays that w
the antecedents of. modern dra
Original Effort
After the directors choose
one-act play, which is often
original effort by a member
the playwriting class or by so
one in the department, they
sign student designers to s
various tasks as creating sets,c
tumes, and lighting for the sho
ng with their student c
the directors begin intensive
hearsals, which last all afterr
and usually into the night in p
paration for the production.
The amount of work put
one of these "minor" product
is almost equal to that of
major productions, and the
diences have been increasingly
preciative of the efforts.

are often too narrow for the un-
dergraduate. However, the under-
graduate who is interested in con-
centrating in either Russian. Far
Eastern, Southeast Asian, Near
Eastern or Japanese studies. may
do so
The centers get money for their
programs, and co-ordinate gradu-
ate training programs. New courses
have been instituted in each area
through the development of the
centers.

These interdisciplinary ce
also help strengthen the lang
and literary departments it
literary college. The Near Ea
studies department was ren
the Near Eastern lanugages
literature department at the
Regents' meeting following
development of the Near Ea
center. The Far Eastern langu
and literature department
undergone a similar change.

The seventeen-year tradition of
the Gilbert and Sullivan Society
will be continued this year with
the presentation of two of the
famed English team's works.
The fun-filled plots, challeng-
ing music, and witty lyrics of the
pair's creations provide work and
diversion for many students in-
terested in acting, singing, and
crew positions.
Last year, in addition to the
two Gilbert and Sullivan produc-
tions, the society also produced
two non G&S productions, "Cox
and Box" and "Toledo War" for
the campus.
Besides the campus perform-
ances the groups usually makes
several trips to nearby cities. One.
excursion is usually made to De-
troit while Flint and Wyandotte.
have hosted other recent produc-
tio ~s

Any University student can join
the Society by attending the mass
meeting held at the beginning of
each semester.
The meetings will be announced
in The Daily and by posters on
campus.
Available jobs include those on
the stage and prop crews and
seats in the orchestra must also
be filled. Of the total member-
ship of about 120, almost half
actually appeared in productions
as principals or memnbers of the
chorus last year.
Design Sets
A full semester is spent by the
group designing, building, and re-
hearsing each of the major Gil-
bert and Sullivan productions be-
fore they are produced near the
end of the term.
Although the Society usually

breaks even financially, its mem-j
bers donate their time. Returns in
enjoyment, it is said however, well
repay the investment in time.
Past performances of the So-
ciety's productions have been held
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre in the League.

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