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October 15, 1963 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sportswear . ..

Casual Materials for Jewelry
Include Ancient Scarabs, Wood

By JUDY GOLDSTEIN
What's new in the fall color
spectrum? 7
Teal blue, mellow cranberry,
green and blue plaids, olive green
and deep plum are the predomin-
ate colors on the campus scene.
Rating high on the fashion scale,
are burgundy wrap around skirts
blended with shocking pink blouses.
! Jumpers are big and found in fab-
rics of corduroy, madras and her-
ringbone tweeds.
An array of culottes and skir-
lottes are finding their place in the
Lenses Make
'Pow Eyes'
By ALAN SHULMAN

t
T
T
T
t
1
E
,t
t
7
i
i

trend to sporty clothes. V and U-
necked sweaters combining flashy
reds and, subtle pinks are comple-
mented by various colored stretch
pants.
Amid this splendor of the spec-
trum, chalk white on blackboard
grey are popular combinations.
White silk shirts are paralleled
with pin-striped wool flannel skirts.
Gigantic sized plaids in brown
and white accent the simple lines
of any tailored suit.
Hitting campus with a display
of irridescence to dazzle the eye,
are the "nouveau" neo-neons. Co-
ordinating hot pink and purple,
luscious lemon and lime, vivacious
vermillion and violet, all mixed to-
gether yielding brilliant blends to
add that extra attraction to the
college wardrobe.'
Shifts in any of these striking
and bold or soft and subtle color
creations are geared for comfort
and are right in style.
Whether on a date or merely
sitting in class the co-ed who uti-
lizes all the multitudes of hues and
shades of colors will be "in."

A sinister plot to overthrow the f
last bastion of American femininitye
has been launched. In the August4
issue of Mademoiselle, Maxim Fak-
torov, notorious underworld cos-;
metic figure, announced his inten-l
tions to undermine the natural
beauty of women's eyes.
He arrogantly boasted that his
new tinted contact lenses can
"glint brown eyes with gold or .
shade blue eyes to green. Hazel
eyes--a color term that's often
synonymous with we-don't-know-
to-call-them (an obvious slur at
the hazel-eyed)-:can become a dis-
tinct brown or green depending on
the lens."
Insidious lenses
With Faktorov's insidious lenses
"pale eyes can become pow eyes
if you use a lens a shade or two
deeper than your own. natural
color." The unscrupulous Faktorov
then unveiled his ultimate weapon,
the painted cosmetic lens, which
"can change eye color completely."
TWhere can be no doubt as to the
farreaching significance of this
latest cosmetic threat. It is time to
statt asking yourself some soul-
searching questions. Has your girl
been telling you that her right eye
is naturally green and her left eye"
naturally piny when in truth she
has been wearing contacts to
match the colors of her outfit.
Stand Firm
Only by standing firm can we
demonstrate our resolve to face
this imminent danger. Only by
constant vigilance can this threat
be overcome.

READY FOR RACE-There once was a girl in a sweater/ (and a
pair of slacks too, to look better) / who would run cross the arb/
in her collegiate garb/ chased by thousands of boys and one setter.
MORAL: You too can be pursued if appropriately attired.

VARIOUS LENGTHS:
Display Stylis B twa

By BARBARA SEYFRIED
and ROBERTA POLLACK
Women's jewelry features two;
really new approaches to acces-
sories. Rather than stressing eith-
er gold or silver as has been done
in the past, two new materials;
have been discovered or, perhaps,
rediscovered.
Wooden jewelry, in the form of
necklaces, pins, earrings, or hair
adornments, has become the dis-
tinguishing mark of the individ-
ualstic, well-dressed woman.
The scarab, an ancient Egyp-
tian talisman, ornament and sym-
bol of ressurrection is rapidly
gaining popularity among campus
women.
Originally, w e a t h y ancient
Egyptians used the scarabs as a
seal. When the name of the own-
er of the seal was eventually in-
scribed on it, scarabs attained a1
religious or amulet status.
The religious significance grew'
until the scarab became the sym-
bol of the god, Kheperi, an asex-
ual sun god.
Superstitious
The scarab was used as the'
symbol because of the supersti-
tious attachment it had and be-
cause ancient Egyptians believed
that the scarab insect was asexual
also.I
One point of comparison used3
was the way the scarab could be
found rolling its food along the7
ground with the Egyptian con-
ception that the run rolled acrossi
the sky.I
The scarab was not only used
by the god Kheperi. As the popu-
larity of the stone scarabs grew,
they became a combination sou-
venir and advertisement. Temples
of various gods gave them away
to pilgrims when they visited.
Whether for dress or for casual
wear, this jewelry adds an enviable
flair of character to her appear-'
ance.
For Every Occasion
The less embellished wooden
jewelry is perfect for autumn foot-
ball games. Worn with turtle neck
sweaters, shirts, or suits, its
uniqueness of shape, its exotic

quality transforms a plain outfit
into a creation that hints at the
mysticism of native jungles.
Dressier occasions find pearls or
gold designed on dark ebony set-
tings; perfect for simple black
sheathes or velvet shifts.
For the imposing, goddess-like
woman, the more massive forms of
these wooden pieces provide the
crowning touch. The more petite

By ALISON SMALLEY
Fashion authorities might be
trying to bring hemlines down this
fall.
It may be down for the hemline
this year, but the boot is climbing
on both the leg and the fashion
ladder.
The traditional rainy weather
shoe is hardly recognizable. Long
and slim, short and tapered, ap-
pearing in all fabrics, the boot is
now as style conscious as it is
weather conscious.
Boots start at ankle length and
gradually reach the thigh. The
short "crocodile" boot features a
low heel and patent leather. Mid-
way betweenknee and ankle is the
"cowboy" with calfskin and stack
heel as its attractions.
Various Materials
The "swashbuckler," just a 'few
inches higher, runs rampant in
fake-fur, poplin, and elkskin.

female finds the delicate carvings
of smaller pieces more fitting for
her wardrobe.
Complementary
The somber, almost Puritan'
quality of this year's styles are'
perfected by the addition of re-,
gal wooden jewelry.
Its. naturalness complements
beautifully the straight lines and
rigid cuts so prevalent now.

Tickling the knee with rubber,
suede and fur, the "stovepipe"
can be purchased with a higher
heel. For the thigh boot, a soft
corduroy is the predominating fab-
ric.
Ann Arbor merchants are dis-
playing boots for cold weather
with flannel and pile linings.
Easy Walking
"Most of our boots have flat
heels for easy walking. Black and
red seem to be the favorite colors,
but they are all selling well," said
one local business woman.
Boots aren't the only hit in foot-
wear. The penny loafer has intro-
duced the Italian shoe with smooth
front and sleek sides. "This shoe
has, far outsold the conventional
saddle front model," said another
Ann Arbor shoe dealer.

CULTURAL TREND:
Colorful Picasso Patterns
Bid for Costume Spotlight"
'I

Reptiles Play
Major Role
In Apparel
By ROSALIE BAINE
More and more alligators
iguana lizards are giving the "
full measure of devotion" in
interest of fashion this year.
Local merchants report a sli
upswing in the sales of both sh
and bags of reptile leathers.
They recommend alligator
iguana leathers for their dura
ity and their ability to to be ea
cleaned with a damp cloth.
Adapted to Shoes
Shoes of such leathers, form(
difficult to "break in," now
come comfortable sooner while
shoes wear longer.
The thicker hide from the b
of the reptile is used for the fr
of the shoe for greater durabi
The thinner, softer skin from
sides of the animal forms the s:
of the shoe, thus increasing f
ibility.
Bags are constructed in so:
what the same manner.'
tougher hide makes up the fr
back and bottom, while the us
the thinner skin increases the f
ibility of the side folds.
Simulated Reptiles
Recent fashion magazines h
featured boots and bags of s
ulated alligator which prodi
the chic look of alligator fe
fraction of the price.
Especially popular are the hi
glossy brown pouch bags a
shoulder straps.

While the stack heel has proven
popular with the walking set, new
in dress shoes is the jet heel,
which is the "perfect thing for
the tall girl with a short boy-
friend," as one salesman put it.
Tapered at the top with a slightly
flared bottom, this one inch heel
was introduced two years ago, and
is still fashion news.
The Word
"For dressy wear, the plain
leather heel is best. For very dressy,
the dyeable shoe, tinted to match
the shade of the outfit, is perfect,"
is the word from another author-
ity on feminine likes and dislikes
in Ann Arbor.
Co-eds can find all these styles
in local shops to insure them-
selves of a dry and distinctive
winter in footwear.

by RUTH SELIGMAN
Fashions have taken a new turn
this year. They are no longer de-
signed only to build up a woman's
vanity, but also to bring out aes-
thetic appreciation in her admir-
ers; appreciation of modern art,
Fashion editors have predicted
that styles in huge Picasso prints
will be the next campus-shatter-
ing fad.
According to the fashion maga-
zines, every well-dressed coed will
parade about in a jump suit, parka,
or sweat shirt which has the sig-
nature of the master himself.
These experts, sitting in their
New York offices, are probably ex-
panding the craze to give the coed
in her sleepy college town the op-
portunity to have a completely
matching wardrobe.
This may include a wrap-around
Renoir, A-shape Degas jumper
(ballerina in front), and for the
bolder ones, Rembrandt sneakers.
The social system on campus
would adapt to this quite well. The
"in" group would tend to mix their
artists by periods, regardless of the
fact that Gauguin liked yellow and
green, while Van Gogh happened to
use magenta and blue.
Prints like these could prove eco-
nomically sound for the under-
graduate counting her pennies.
Cleaning costs drop since a smudge
or even a deep stain could always

be attributed to the artists' style.
Hemlines nolonger cause a prob-
lem since it is definitely disrespect-
ful to cut off some of Picasso's
genius.
If the fashion experts do manage
to tear the style-conscious fresh-
man away from her loafers, dark
pleated skirts and white shirts, this
campus will become a haven for
history or art students.
One great disadvantage of. this,
however, is that the United States
may have to increase its appropria-
tions to India - 50,000 Madras
weaving women will have to be
unemployed.

ALL NAME BRAND YARNS
KNITTING SUPPLIES
Instruction books
Buttons, etc.
Coll 662-0303
YANRNCRAFT-btw SHOPr
I11 Nickels Arcade-between Maynard & State

_ _

U.

once in a lifetime a cosmetic
changes the whole idea of make-up:
In our time it's...
'BLUSH-0N b

-k

The olive tweed
jumper with its leather
trim pockets-$12.95
The dacron-cotton
blouse in Oyster, Blue,
Pink, Green-$5.95
Campus Theater Building
1212S. University

I I

"This is the

-,


_ ,.
. 3 F _ +
:
^:

$ J1

year of the
H16H BOOT!"

Blush-On' is not a powder or a rouge...
It's a new invention in makeup
+,alled a blusher'...gives your whole face
a "come-alive" glowl
Slush-0n is the sheerest cloud of color you fluff on
over your whole face (right over your make-up)--with
its own soft-as-sable brush. It gives you a new kind of
radiance. (Some call it "instant health!") Takes the
place of rouge. Sometimes takes the place of sleep!
Never has so little done so much for your looks-except,
nprh21'~t. fall1;11eiiniilove.

COAT ENSEMBLES:
wrapping up the I
new mood of fashion
in wool tweed...back-belted coats
with matching shift dresses (to self.
belt or not). Wear them sportively or
in the traditional manner. Black/white.
A. Double-breasted wool herringbone
tweed coat and shift, 39.95

162"
high

THE STOVEPIPE-Patent Look "Royalon" in Black
or Red. Light, Warmly Lined. Doesn't leak, crack,
freeze or stain in the slush.

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