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October 15, 1963 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1963

EPLACES ADENAUER:
Erhard'Big Moment Nears

By JOHN WEYLAND
Associated Press Staff Writer
BONN-Ludwig Erhard, after
patiently waiting in the wings for
years, at last becomes West Ger-
many's new chancellor today.
Konrad Adenauer, the retiring
chancellor, did not want Erhard,
his popular economics minister, to
succeed him. Adenauer delayed his
retirement because he believed Er-
hard did not have the political
talent to follow him. Erhard built
up his following until he became
the only choice of the Christian
Democratic Party and its coalition
ally, the Free Democratic Party.
Together they control the majority
in parliament needed to elect him.
Erhard is taking over one of the
toughest political assignments in
the world. He has to govern with
a coalition. He takes over a coun-
try with politically explosive prob-
lems. He has to triumph over a
Social Democratic opposition gain-
ing more and more favor with the
voters.
'Father of Miracle'
Erhard brings to the chancellor-
ship 14 years of experience as a
cabinet member and great per-
sonal popularity as the "father of
the economic miracle" of postwar
recovery. He opposes the govern-
ment's mixing in business and
supports United States-favored
policies on Europe and the Atlan-
tic Alliance.
Erhard is inheriting a stable,
prosperous country but also many
problems that could blow up in,
his face during the next two years.
That is all the time left before
the next election, in which he
must lead his party to a strong
showing if he hopes to be re-
elected chancellor.
A steady rise in the federal bud-
get threatens to force an unpopu-
lar tax increase in 1964 or 1965.
Labor unions are pressing for big
wage boosts. Economic growth has
slowed down, making inflation a
danger.
Contradictory Policies
In foreign affairs West Ger-
many is entangled in contradictory
policies.. It has entered into .a,
special close relation with France
but professes full loyalty to the
United States. It generally cham-
pions freer trade in the Western
world but because of farm and
other pressure groups supports
some protectionist measures in
the Common Market.
Adenauer has sought to eive
West Germany the reputation of
a peace-loving country but at the
same time has opposed United
States-Soviet moves to lessen
East-West tensions. He has re-
fused to accept the present bor-
ders in Europe, which would end
hopes for winning back East Ger-
many from the Communist bloc.
Erhard has promised to con-
tinue the main lines of Adenauer's

Rights Bill
To Face
Stiff Test
WASHINGTON-The drive for
civil rights is at an extremely pre-
carious point in Congress.
Informed participants in the
campaign to get thescivil rights
bill through the House see a seri-
ous danger that all hopes for
prompt legislation on the turbulent
racial issue may go down in a
political tangle, the New York
Times reported recently.
A crucial test comes today when
Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy goes
before the faction-ridden House
Judiciary Committee. He will be
trying to rescue a bill from a de-
veloping political impasse.
Sharp Contrast
The real situation at the Capitol
is in sharp contrast to the rosy
picture some civil rights supporters
hae spainted. Their optimism
stems from the fact that a House
Judiciary subcommittee has ap-
proved the strongest civil rights
bill ever.
However, the wholly committed
civil rights advocates do not have
the votes in Congress to pass a
bill meeting their wishes. By press-
ing for all they want they risk
alienating the votes needed to pass
anything at all, the Times main-
tained.
Irritates Republicans
The present draft is not accept-
able to moderate Republicans. It
has alienated and irritated the
mild-mannered. ranking Republi-
can on the Judiciary Committee,
Rep. William M. McCullouch (R-
Ohio).
With the bill as it is, Republi-
cans on the full Judiciary Com-
mittee may stall any action for
weeks. If it gets out of the com-
mittee, the bill may be stalled
well past the New Year in the
House Rules Committee.

FIRST NEGRO TO RUN:
King To Seek High Post
Against White Candidates

SUPERB ! FASCINATES!
DAZZLED AND DAZZLED
BRILLIANCE .. . GLITTER!
IMPRESSIVE DISPLAY
-RANCONT, Ann Arbor News

'J

ALBANY, Ga. (P)-For the first
time ever, A Negro is running for;
mayor of Albany and he and his
two white opponents agree he
hasn't a chance of winning Tues-
day's election.
Why is he running, then?
"I am really interested in free-
ing the minds of Negroes because
many of them feel that no black
man should aspire for high of-
fices," the Negro candidate, Slater
King, said yesterday.
His Rationale
He lists other reasons.
-His candidacy "will help our
young Negroes feel they are a part
of the democratic process."
-Negroes are spurred to regis-
ter and vote.
-"We've had almost no train-
ing politically. This helps the Ne-
gro to think politically."
-"It also makes white politi-
cians, when you can deliver a
sizeable bloc of votes, a little more
cognizant of giving more recog-
nition to the Negro community."
King is acting president of the
Albany Movement, which has
pushed for desegregation in this
southwest Georgia city for several
months.
Should Make Runoff
Of Albany's 58,000 population,
about 24,000 are Negroes and about
4600 Negroes are among the city's
16,646 registered voters. Political
observers feel King will get most
of the Negro vote and that this
probably would put him in a run-
off. A majority is necessary for
election.
"I frankly don't think I would
have a chance in a runoff," King
said. "The way the city is run you
wouldn't think we had any Ne-
groes living here. It's almost an
extenuation of the- system they
had during slavery times when
Negroes were counted in the

population but had no voice in
elections."
The white candidates, Attorney
James V. Davis and architect Ed-
ward V. Jones, have talked mostly
about federal controls and taxes
and they have been pretty much
in agreement on their views.
No Chance
Davis said he felt there would
be a runoff and that King would
be in it. "I don't think he has a
chance of winning," Davis said,
'unless the white people sit down
and don't go to the polls. People
are rather excited about it and
I don't believe they'll do that."
"It may be he wants to get the
people accustomed to having a
Negro in a race here-to break
'the ice, so to speak," Davis said.
Davis, a former representative,
got about 40 per cent of the vote
in losing to Mayor Asa Kelley two
years ago. Kelley is not seeking
re-election.
Racial Bloc Voting
In the 1961 election a Negro
candidate for a city commission
seat made it to the runoff and was
then defeated in a vote almost al-
together along racial lines.
King conceded that the vote
Tuesday also will reflect white
and Negro bloc voting, but added
there has been some change in the
past two years.
"Even some segregationists have
said they feel the black man
should have a change to run for
public offices.
Several Negroes have run for
offices throughout the state in
recent years but few have been
elected. At present there are eight
Negro members of the State
Democratic Committee, a Negro
member of the Atlanta Board of
Education and a Negro member of
the State Senate, Leroy Johnson
of Atlanta.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

m

A FETCHING
PRODUCTION
-D^trot Free Press

TRU EBLOOD
THEATRE
Sat. Oct. 19 8:00
Sun. Oct. 20 3:00

ACTING ...
EXCEPTIONAL
-Detroit News

MORRIE RICHMAN presents

-Associated Press
PROMOTIONS-German Economics Minister Ludwig Erhard, 65,
left, who willsucceed Konrad Adenauer as chancellor of West Ger-
many, talks in Bonn with Erich Mende who will succeed to Er-
hard's Job as vice chancellor. Mende is leader of the Free Demo-
crat Party.

policies, but indicated tlere will be
difference in emphasis and de-
tails. With this formula he can
remain true to his party's heri-
tage, a political necessity, but
leave some room for striking out
on his own.
European Market
On the basis of past statements
and actions, Erhard will work for
a Common Market of the type
sought by the United States and
opposed by France. It would be
enlarged to include Britain and
other Western European nations,
ending the division of the "con-
tinent into rival trade blocs. It
would lower tariffs on United
States products and those from
other nonmembers. It would stress
free enterprise, not the French
type of economic planning.
The recent French-West Ger-
man cooperation treaty does not
compel the two countries to follow
common policies, so Erhard will
not be blocked by it.
Economic Cooperation
In domestic affairs Erhard is
pledged to continue his efforts at
"masshalten" (moderation), his
program for labor and manage-
ment holding down their demands
to prevent inflation.
Unlike Adenauer, who has run
things his own way with an iron
will, Erhard will not impose his
policies on the new government
but seek to put them over on their
merits. He is planning to handle

the cabinet like a team. This car-
ries the risk that he will be forced
to settle for compromise measures
and fail to carry through a pro-
gram that would impress the vot-
ers.
In the struggle for a comeback,
Erhard will lack clear control of
his own party. Adenauer, though
87, remains his party's national
chairman, a position of power.
This could mean trouble. Ade-
nauer has publicly belittled Er-
hard as an economics specialist
with no aptitude for politics.

ALL SEATS RESERVED - . Main Floor...$3.50, $2.75, $2.50
MeU....$3.50, $2.75, $2.50, $2.00 " Arena.......,$2.50, $2.00, $1.75
TICKETS ON SALE AT
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SGC Reading and Discussion Group
Pane1 Discussion of Kafka

Wednesday, October
7:30 P.M.

17

Multi-purpose Room - UGLI

(Continued from Page 2)
ducer of Cultural and Educational TV
Programs, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Oct.
17-19.
Herman Verdin, Acting Director, Ar-
tistic and Educational Programs, Bel-
gium National Radio and TV, Brussels,
Belgium, Oct. 17-18.
Jefferson Chen, Vice-President of the
Union Press Organization, Malaysia, Oct.
19-21.
Beno Hvala, Editor of Daily News Pro-
grams, Radio-television Yugoslavia, Lju-
bljuna, Yugoslavia, Oct. 20-22.
Hrvoje Juracic, Editor-in-Chief, "Ra-
dio and TV in School," Zagreb, Yugo-
slavia, Oct. 20-22.
H. C. Mathur, Member of Parliament
from Rajasthan State, Member of Exec.
Committee,aCongress Parliamentary
Party, New Delhi, India, Oct. 20-21.
S. R. Damani, Textile mill owner, for-
mer Member of Parliament, India, Oct.
20-21.
Placement
ANNOPNCEMENTS:
The Next Peace Corps Exam will be
held on Sat,, Oct. 19 at 8:30 a.m. in
the Main Street Post Office. Question-
naires are available at the Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
Federal Service Entrance Exam-You
must apply by Oct. 17 (Thurs.) to take
the 'SEE on Nov. 16. Apply now so
that all processing & employment inter-
viewing can be completed before grad-
uation.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Welch Grape Juice Co., Westfield,
N.Y.-Opening for Research Chemist to
work in food products development. MS
degree - new graduate (BS degree with
2-5 yrs. exper.).
YWCA, Kalamazoo, Mich. - Seeking
Adult Program Director. Woman who
has majored in group work & with a
MA-will consider a graduate with an
AB in Soc.cor Soc. Work.
Management Consultants in Chicago
-Client firms havevarious openings
including: Sales 't'rainee (ChE); Prod-
uct Engnr.; Sales Mgr.; Mktg. Mgr.;
Dist. Sales Mgr.; Sales Engnrs.; Sani-
tary Sales Engnr.; etc.
* * *
For further information, please call
SPECIAL
CAM PUS
RATES
Faculty
Magazine Student Educator
Time 4.00yr 7.00yr
8.002yr $143yr
*Atl Mon 3.50 8 mo 3.50
8 mo
*Sat Review ' 4.00 yr

General Div.. Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools will be at the
Bureau of Appointments to interview
candidates the week of Oct. 21st.
TUES., OCT. 22-
Katonah, N.Y.-German/Spanish; 6th
grade.
WED., OCT. 23-
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Twp. Schs.)
-Elem.; HS Library; Ind. Arts; Mentally
Handicapped; Emotionally Disturbed.
* * * I
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB, 663-1511, Ext.
3547.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students,
please call Ext. 3544 for interview appts.
with the following:
THURS., OCT. 17-
Argonne National Laboratory, Ar-
gonne Ill. & Idaho Falls, Idaho-Dec.
& May grads-(p.m. only). - Men &
Women. Seeking all levels Math, PhD in
Chem., Biochem. & Physics for posi-
tions in Statistics & Res. & Dev. Non-
citizens must be exceptionally quali-
fied.
ORGANIZATION
-- NOTICES
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge Meeting, Oct.
15, 7 p.m., 3516 SAB.
* * *
Am. Soc. for Public Administration,
Oct. 16, T p.m., Mich. League, Mich.
Room. Speaker: Herbert Kaufman, Yale
Univ., "Laws, Theories, and Organiza-
tions." Refreshments.
Cercle Francais, Film: "La Beaute du
Diable," Oct. 15, 8 p.m., UGLI, Multi-
purpose Room.
German Club, German Conversation,
Music, Singing and Refreshments, Oct.
16, 3-5 p.m., 4072 FB. "Herzlich Will-
kommen!"
JCC, Petitioning for student members
of Committee and Standards & Con-
duct begins Oct. 7. Deadline date Oct.
17. Interviewing time & place will be
announced at a later date. Petitions
available from Mrs. Belaire, 1011 SAB.
Rifle Club, Shooting, Oct. 16, 7-10
p.m., ROTC Rifle Range. Beginners'
school, 8 p.m.; sign up for club im-
provement match now.
* * *
Sociedad Hispanica, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.,
3050 FB. Speaker: Prof. A. H. Kuhn,
"Poetas espanoles del siglo de oro en
Austria."
Young Democrats, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.,
Union, Rm. 3D. Speaker: Prof. R. Bar-
low, U. of M. Dept. of Economics,
"Romney Tax Program."

Bureau of International Commerce,
Wash., D.C.-Men & Women-Dec. &
May grads. Seeking majors in Econ.,
Foreign Trade, Bus. Ad., Mktg. & re-
lated subjs. for positions as Economist
& Business Analyst (Trade Specialist,
research & traderpromotion). Entrance
level positions are filled through the
FSEE. U.S. citizenship required.
FRI., OCT. 18--
Texaco, Inc., Chicago, 11.-Men-Dec.
& May grads-(p.m. only). Seeking ma-
jors in Econ. & general Liberal Arts
for Marketing of petroleum products,
including service station merchandis-
ing & sales. U.S. citizens.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule posted at 128-H
W.Engrg, for appointments with the
following:
OCT. 16-
Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago,-
Il1.-All Degrees: ChE, Chem.-(Analyt.
& Organic). BS-MS: IE. BS: ME. R. &
D., Des., Prod. & Others.
Arthur Andersen & Co., Detroit, Chi-
cago, N.Y., Cleveland, Milwaukee, etc.-
All Degrees: IE. Operations Res., Prod.
& inventory control w/a public acctg.
firm.
OCT. 16 & 18--
Argonne National Lab., Various divs.
at Argonne, Ill., & Idaho Falls, Idaho-
All Degrees: ChE, EE, EM, Instru.,
Mat'ls., ME, Met. & Nuclear. R. & D.
OCT. 16-
Babcock & Wilcox Co., Ohio, Western
Pa. & Va.-All Degrees: ME. MS-PhD:
ChE & Nuclear & Math. BS: CE, EE &
IE. BS & PhD: Met. MS: Phys. Chem. &
Physics. PhD: Analytical & Inorg. Chem.
R. & D., Des., Prod., Sales & Atomic.
Federal-Mogul-Bower Bearing, Inc.,
Warren, & Detroit, Mich.; Lancaster,
Pa.; Greensburg, Ind.-BS: EE, EM, IE
& Met. BS-MS: ME. Des., Prod., Sales
& Metallurgy.
Food Machinery & Chemical Corp.,
Chem. Divs.; American Viscose Div.;
Ordnance Div.-Operations Nationwide

-All Degrees: ChE. BS: IE & ME. R. &
D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
OCT. 16-18-
IBM Corp., Res. & Dev. Labs. in N.Y.,
Calif., Minn., Md. & Ky.-PhD: Com-
mun. Sci., EE, EM, Instru., Mat'ls., ME
& Met. R. & D.
OCT. 16 (p.m.)-
Mead Johnson.& Co., Evansville, Ind.
-BS: ChE, CE, EE, IE & ME. Plant
& Equipment Engrg.
Oct. 16-
U.S. Navy, Bureau of Ships, Philadel-
phia Naval Shipyard-BS-MS: EE,DME.
ES: NA & Mar. MS: Nuclear. R. & D. &
Des.
.fart-Time
Employment
The following part-time fobs are
available. Applications for' these jobs
can be made in the.Part-time Placement
Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg.,
during the following hours: Mon. thru.
Fri.; 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m-
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-thne or full-time temporary
work, should contact: Dave Lowman,
Part-time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
1-Keypunch operator, with experience
to work full-time until Dec. or Jan.
-Several Psychological subjects need-
ed. Must be male and over 21 years
old. Contact Mental Health Research
Inst. Ext. 7431.
-Several miscellaneous positions
available,both on and off campus.
1-Administrative Asst. Must be grad
student with Industrial Relations
background either through course
work or experience. Will be writing
job descriptions.
1-Position for Pharmacy student to
work in drugstore. Good experience.

L

G IGHAM IHN
2755 WASHTENAW
Washtenaw's Favorite Spot
for FINE FOOD and COCKTAILS
FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT
KATHY CRANKSHAW
at the piano
for your singing and enjoyment
TUESDAY and THURSDAY
DANCING ON SATURDAY ONLY
featuring ...
LES SWINGERS TRIO
with JOANNE on vocal
Your Genial Host, Don Bileti

I

STUDENT
DIRECTORY

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
An Agency Representative will interview undergraduate Seniors and
Graduate students who terminate their studies in June, -August or .
September 1964 on Campus on the dates of October 21 through 23,
1963 at the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 Student Activities Build-
ing; and on October 24 and 25, 1963 at the Offices of the Director of
Placement, School of Business Administration. Employment opportuni-
ties are diversified to include a special training program in the Intelli-
gence profession.
Please consult the Placement Bureau appropriate to your curriculum for
information concerning the career positions available. Such information
is, likewise, available at the Office of the Career Counselor, 3200 Stu-
dent Activities Building. A careful review of this information is an
essential requisite prior to scheduling an interview.

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