100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1963 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r

Erratic Earth Causes Bureau
To Adjust Official U.S. Clocks

UNEMPLOYMENT, HOUSING, INFLATION:
Illia Seeks To Ease Argentina's Economiie Gloom

By JOHN BARBOUR
Associated Press Science Writer
WASHINGTON-Scientists an-
nounced yesterday that the Earth
is turning on its axis at a slower
speed-a consistently slower speed
since April of last year.
Real time as measured by atom-'
ic clocks shows that the Earth is
lagging by' as much as one tenth
of a second, and international
time signals are off by that much.
Accordingly, the National Bur-
eau of Standards and the United
States Naval Observatory an-
nounced that their transmitting
clocks will be set back one-tenth
of a second at the end of this
month.
World Use
The radio tihe signals broadcast
by worldwide stations are used for
navigation, satellite tracking and
astronomical observations.
Scientists had always relied on
the Earth as a clock-as mankind

itself had-using the 24-hour per-
iod it takes the Earth to make one
complete rotation on its axis.
The Earth turns at a fairly
quick speed, so that if someone
on the moon were looking at you
on the Earth's equator, you would
appear to be moving about 1000
miles an hour with the Earth's
spin.
Changeover
But since 1955, scientists have
used the vibrations of atoms in
atomic clocks to measure real time,
since this is a much more un-
changing a'nd precise measure-
ment./
Since then, they've f6und that
the Earth is a fairly unreliable
clock for their precise purposes.
In 1955, the Earth's spin was slow-
ing. About September of 1957 it
started accelerating again. Then
in April, 1962, came another de-
celerating period.

While it doesn't do much to the
daily turn of events, the setback
greatly affects scientific measure-
ments. Astronomers found that
some heavenly bodies were show-
ing up in their telescopes later
than they should have.
No one is sure why the Earth
speeds up and slows down in its
rotation.
But one theory relies on varia-
tions in the action of a molten
core inside the Earth on the
Earth's rotational speed. Another
theory holds that acceleration or
deceleration is caused by the rise
and fal of land masses.

Get Set for the NEW
CHRISTY MINSTRELS CONCERT

MiTSIC SHOP'

Check our
extensive stock
of folk music
including
recordings
by the
New Christy
Minstrels
417 E. Liberty
Ph. NO 2-0675

ALLEN DULLES
... CIA the 'scapegoat'

By FRANK N. MANITZAS
Associated Press Staff Writer
BUENOS AIRES-Arturo Um-I
berto Illia took the oath of office
as Argentine president in neither
the gold braid of a military officer
nor the traditional white tie and
tails Saturday.
The 63-year-old doctor from the
hill country seeks to epitomize the
common man in his dress, in his
talk and in his way of doing
business.
He put aside his full-time duties
as a physician to start directing
South America's second largest
country-sick for 19 months with
political and economic pains.
Humble Background
Illia speaks the language of an
average middle class citizen. His
background is not unusual: one of
14 children whose father was an
Italian immigrant and the mother
an Argentine.
Illia worked his way through an
education, settled down in the
small hill town of Cruz Del Eje
and played politics while practic-
ing medicine.
He emphasizes that Argentina
will maintain a Western-oriented
but independent foreign policy. He
pledges to promote business on an
"Argentina first" basis, making
the state's view predominant in
dealings with foreign-based enter-
prises, specifically in the fields of
oil production and financial nego-
tiations.
Social Problems
For the man in the street, Illia
promises political and economic
stability coupled to a firm attack
on the problems he considers most
important. Unemployment is es-
timated at 10 per cent. In housing,
1.8 million family units are needed.
The cost of living is rising amid
danger of uncontrolled inflation.
The educational system is in-
adequate-three of every ten are
limited to one year of formal
schooling.
To master these problems Illia
will lean primarily on his own
political machinery, the People's
Radical Civic Union. It comes to
power for the first time in 33 years
and the party may prove difficult
to hold back from political spoils,
Backed by Labor
His informal personal approach
and his spiel in the countryside
"I'm for the working man"- have
lined up the powerful organized
labor movement behind him. This,
in effect gives him more support
than shown by the July 7 elec-
tion where only one out of foura
Argentines voted for him.
Many businessmen are placing
their bets on the chances that
Illia may depart from his reform-'
minded party platform, once he
sees the problems of politics and
the need for association between3
business and government. E
When he took the oath of office,;
he did not ride with President

Jose Maria Guido, whom he suc-
ceeded directly, or the past elected
president, Arturo Frondizi, who
was ousted by the military March
29, 1962.
Shows Line
To show that no separation has
been made between the civilian
and military leaders, the new
president rode with a military es-
cort.
Illia was in an open car with the
commanders in chief of the army
and air force at his elbows.
The road back to a constitution-
al government has not been easy.
Argentina has paid untold millions
of dollars in loss of trade and
production due to military-led re-
bellions.
Background
Arturo Frondizi was overthrown,
claim the military, because he
would have allowed forces loyal
to exiled dictator-president Juan
Domingo Peron to return to power.
The military also did not approve
of policies with regard to Cuba,
and finally forced a diplomatic
break.

*FIht

But what Frondizi promised, Il-
lia also has promised. He, too,
would allow Peronists to vote
openly for their candidates. The
new chief executive says Argen-
tina does not need laws that dis-
criminate against ideologies.
Illia also promises trade with
every nation including Cuba and
Communist China, but he adds
that "trade does not necessarily
mean diplomatic recognition."
Economic Task
Making up for lost time will be
Illia's biggest job.
Government economists say Ar-
gentina's production activity is

ALL-CAMPUS
PEP RALLY
Friday Night 8:00-10:00
ON THE DIAG
Sponsored by IFC and State Street Fraternities

OCTOBER SPECIAL
Firdoy the 11th thru Friday the 18th
First Run Diamond Needles
Most Types
4495
The MUSIC CENTER, Inc.
304 S. Thayer 1304 S. University

Dulles Backs
CIAActions
NEW YORK MP)-Former Cen-
tral Intelligence Agency Director
Allen W. Dulles was reported yes-
terday as saying the nation's spy
apparatus is being made "the
goat" for American blundering in
South Viet Nam.
"Occasionally the CIA has ┬░to be
made the goat,"- he was quoted in
a copywright story in the New
York Journal-American by Wil-
liam McCullam. "It looks like it
has to be the goat again.
"Still-it may be better for the
CIA to be tarred in the Vietnamese
mess than the President of the
United States or the secretary of
state."
Any disputes between the CIA,
the State Department and military
leaders involved in the war against
Communist guerillas in South Viet
Nam have been due to the lack of
a clear-cut operational policy in
Washington, Dulles said.
No operations of a political na-
ture ever have been mounted by
the CIA without White House ap-
proval and there never has been
a case where the agency has failed
to go along with White House
policy to the best of its ability, he
added.

back to 1958 rates. After a four
per cent drop in the gross national
product in 1962, an 8.2 per cent
decline is forecast this year.
Bright lights of a favorable
foreign trade balance barely pen-
etrate the gloomy clouds hanging
over the national budget deficit,
Compensation
It is expected to hit a record
high: 45 billion pesos or more.
What this means in hard cur-
rency is difficult to say. The peso
dropped from 83 pesos to $1 at the
time of Frondizi's ouster to about
150 pesos, and no bottom is in
sight.

Tied up with all this is
operation of vast government
chinery which spills over into
mills, transportation on land
and in the air, electrical pl
oil refineries, and communici
systems. Just about everythir
in the red.
Optimistic
Undertaking these problems
more, Illia seems to have ir
favor his own faith plus
people's desire to get out of
mess.
"I think that in six month
can get the country mo
again," he says.

ARTURO ILLIA
... tasks ahead
JUSTIFIED?
To Examine
.Price .Rises
WASHINGTON (M--President
John F. Kennedy's Consumer Ad-
visory Council said yesterday it
will make a special study of re-
cent price increases in steel, elec-
trical equipment, aluminum and
heavy chemicals.
The council said the price rises
"do not appear to constitute an
immediate inflationary threat."
But it added that is was plan-
ning a study "to determine wheth-
er such increases appear to be
justified from the consumer point
of view."

HELP WANTED
FULL OR PART TIME HELP-Apply
McDonald's Drive In, 2000 W. Sta-
dium. 1H44
PART-TIME-10 a.m. to 12 noon Mon.,
Wed., Fri. 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. 2 or
3 nights. Apply in person after 1
p.m., Drake's Sandwich Shop. H43
FOR RENT
SPACIOUS 3 RM. APT. Ideal for grad
or prof. couple. 605 Elmcrest Dr., one
block N. of Summit off Minor. Can
be seen after 1 p.m. C17
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
State St. luxury apt. with 3. 665-2719.
C16
3 BDRM. APT., fireproof, laundry fa-
cilities, garage. In SW Ann Arbor. NO
2-6958. C13
3 ROOMS AND BATH near campus. Off-
street parking. NO 5-7215 or 2-2545
after 6. C12
GIRL ROOMMATE Wanted to share
furn'd. apt, near campus. Call NO
5-7112 after 5:00. 010
ROOM FOR RENT-Clean, pleasant;
garage included. Male student-pre-
ferred. 223 Buena Vista. NO 2-7692.
C50
TIFFANY APARTMENTS
Modern, fully furnished, carpeted, air-
cond Available NOW and for second
semester. Comfort and economy for
1, 2, or 3 persons. Call NO 3-8866. 015
GARAGE and open parking available
near intersection of Wilmont, Forest
and Geddes. Also next to Harris Hall.
Call NO 2-7787. 014
PARKING PLACE
Block from Law Quad. $4.50 per m.
NO 3-7268, C45
BEL-AIR APTS.-1 and 2 bedrooms. All
new. Danish modern furniture. Air-
conditioning, balconies, wall to wall
carpeting. Campus location. 2-5780.
Eves. 2-5140. C24
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE-2 Bedrm, $9500, 3
lts, Roe face cement block garage.
Whitmore Lake Sub. Callb30175. F 4
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
H D SCOOTER, 4500 miles, $275. Call
Brian, 662-9301. Z27
1960 CUSHMAN SCOOTER-New paint
job. Call 662-7880. Z22
1961 LAMBRETTA - All extras. 2900
miles, exc. running cond. $270. 665-
4111, Ext. 257 after 7:30 p.m Z28
FOR SALE-Bella Motor Scooter, like
new. One of the finest made. Must'
see to appreciate. 665-3291. Z12
BUSINESS SERVICES
CUSTOM MAKING for ladies fine ap-
parel. Restyling on your favorite suit
or dress. Also fast alteration on any
garment. 665-6965. J16
AVON REP. now on N. Campus. Will
service dorms. Xmas gift specials.
Call 665-7490. J13
ANY MOTH HOLES, tears, or burns in
your clothes? We'll reweave them like
new. WEAVE-BAC SHOP, 224 Arcade.
ANN ARBOR PIANO SCHOOL-Classics,
Jazz, Theory, taught by pro. pianist.
308 Catherine, Ann Arbor. 662-3735.
J15
WILL DO TYPING at home. Have taken
University qualifying tests. Have dis-
sertation experience. 25c a page, 5c a
copy. Marilyn McGuire, 663-5328. J141
665-8184
MANUSCRIPT typing, transcription,7
medical, legal, technical confer-
ences, mimeographing, offset.
Quick, Accurate, Experienced.

PERSONAL
BENNY, who is bringing Matilda's
kangaroo to the MSU-UM MIXER?
F37
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORPORATION -
"Where marginal prices buy quality
diamonds!" 1209 S. University. 663-
7151. F73
$10,000 WORTH of liquor waiting to be
sold at: The Village Apothecary, 1112
So. University Ave. F12
DIAMONDS-Highest quality at com-
petitive prices. Call C. K. Reaver Co.
of Ann Arbor, 300 S. Thayer, NO
2-1132. P18
ROMANOFF'S RESTAURANT
300 S. Thayer
Serving German Food
SQO READING & Discussion Group
presents number 5 in the current
seminar series: "Franz Kafka: His
Art and Meaning." Tonight, 7:30 p.m.,
Multipurpose Room, UGLI. Speaker:
Dr. Arnold Kaufman, Dept. of Philoso-
phy. F46
4 MSU-UM GAME TICKETS, adjacent
seats 20% off., Will sell 1, 2, 3 or 4.
Call Chris, NO 3-7076. F44
WAH ROO WAH for-All Dartmouth
Alumni. Dartmouth Night in Ann
Arbor, Fri., Oct. 11, 8:30 p.m. Stag.
VFW (314 E. Liberty), $2.00 (at the
door). Refreshments from Tanzi's.
Phone 665-3502 for reservations. F32
SHORT STORIES
NOW BEING considered for publi-
cation in the campus inter-arts mag-
azine, GENERATION. All material
submitted will be carefully read,
criticized, and returned if not used.
Manuscripts may be left at the main
office, Student Publications Bldg.
First issue in October.
GENERATION
"IF YOUR FEET are big and your head
is small, you can go to State just to
play football." Hear this and many
other Michigan songs sung by the
Men's Glee Club. Two popular rec-
ords now on sale in the Fishbowl. F45

PERSONAL
SCRIPTS AVAILABLE for filming
to 543 Church. Will return to a
$1.25
HAIRCUT, Mon. thru Thurs., 347
nard, near Arcade. $1.50 Fri. ant
FRESHMEN! ARE you feeling the
of the campus, the diag, the to
trees, the Saturday afternoons
traditions that are Michigan?
Don't paniel Simply buy a Glee
record this week in the fishbowl
if this doesn't instill in you a
feeling for the old alma mater, t
panic!
NEED MC for World's Faird V
Show, November 8-9. Sign ul
Interview this week at Union St
offices.
THE THETAS invite you to cor
their OPEN HOUSE after the S
game. Come and see Johnny' an
Starglows . . . from 4-6
WANT TO GO out but in need
good babysitter? Look no furth
I am not available, I will see
that you get another competent
sitter. Call Syd-663-1561, Ext.
FURNITURE for Sale. Call 30175.
RONI, HOW 've ya' BEEN?
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Lancaster
Leaving early Oct. 11. Return
Oct. 13. Call Bob P., 662-5614.
WANTED-Ride to Miait of Oh
Oxford, Ohio, the weekend of Oc
Call Judy at 3-7541, Ext. 761.
WANTED-Ride to Pittsburgh or I
City, Pa., the weekend of Oc'
Call Markley, Ext. 6426.
WANT RIDE Tuesday and Thu:
from Ypsi to campus and arrive
a.m., to. leave at 8p.m. Will
expenses. Call 483-4452.
ECON-O-CAR
RENT A COMPACT C
$39
per 12 hr. period plus
pennies per mile
ECON-O-CAR
of ANN ARBOR

CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Tuesday, October 22

... .... ..A.... ................. . .r. ..... ...
DAILY OFFICLAL BULLETIN

ATTENTION STUDENTS

ENGINEERING
SCIENCES

ALL DEGREE LEVELS

* Electronics
* Mechanical
* Industrial
* Engineering Physics
* Mathematics
* Statistics

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10
General Notices
Next Week: Wed. through Sat., 8:00
p.m. in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
the Univ. Players, Dept. of Speech pre-
sent Moliere's "The Miser." Box office
open 12:30-5:00 daily next week, 12:30 to
8:30 performance nights.
Season tickets on sale at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre box office, 12:30-
5:00. Season Tickets on sale through the
19th. Individual performances on sale
Mon., Oct. 14-18.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Young Americans for Freedom, Speech
by Karl Prussion, former FBI counter-
spy, Oct. 10, 4 p.m., Union.
Interquadrangle Council-Assembly As-
soc., Residence Halls Conclave, Oct. 6,
2-5:30 p.m., League Ballroom.;
Interquadrangle Council-Assembly As-
soc., M-MSU Mixer, Oct. 12, 8 p.m.-1
a.m., East Quad.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Dis-
cussion hour, Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m., Ann
Arbor homes.
Interquadrangle Conucil-Assembly As-
soc., Big Ten Residence Halls Assoc.
Presidents' Conference, Oct. 25, 26, 27,
SAB, Stockwell, West & South Quads.
Members of the University Community
who desire to present to the Commit-
tee on Referral their views on the pro-
posed Regulations on Membership Se-
lection in Student Organizations adopt-
ed by Student Government Council on
Oct. 2, 1963 may present them by writ-
ten communication before Oct. 16, 1963.
An open hearing will be conducted that
day at 3 p.m. in Room 3540, SAB, at
which time oral presentation may be
made. Those who wish to appear before
the Committee on that date should
give their names in advance to the sec-
retary to the committee, Mrs. Pfiffner,
in Room 1546, SAB, 663-0553.-Prof. Jo-
seph E. Kallenbach, chairman, Comm.
on Referral, 4624 Haven Hall.

Raymond Goodrich, Radiation Labora-
tory, will speak on "The Physical In-
terpretation with Regge Poles in Dif-
fraction Theory," Thurs., Oct. 10, at 4
p.m. in Room 275 West Engineering.
Refreshments will be in Room 350 W.
Engrg. at 3:30 p.m.
Lecture: Oct. 10, 4 p.m., Prof. Evsey
Domar, Dept. of Econ., MIT, to talk on
"Index Problem Tournament" in Aud.
C, Angell Hall, sponsored by Economics
Society. Open to grad and undergrad
students.
Statistics Seminar: Prof. Bruce Hill
will speak on "The Estimation of Vari-
ance Components," Thurs., Oct. 10, at 4
p.m. in 3201 Angell Hall.
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night:
Fri., Oct. 11, 8 p.m., Room 2003 Angell
Hall. Dr. Richard G. Teske will speak
on "Fun with Light." After the lecture
the Student Observatory on the fifth
floor of Angell Hall will be open for
inspection and for telescopic observa-
tions of Saturn, Jupiter, and Hercules
cluster. Children welcomed, but must
be accompanied by adults.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students,
please call Ext. 3544 for interview appts.
with the following:
MON., OCT. 14-
Mead Johnson & Co.,-U.S. & Over-
seas-Men-Dec. & May grads. (p.m.
only). Seeking general Liberal Arts for
Management Training and Sales. Na-
ture of organization: research, mfg. &
bktg. of Pharmaceutical & nutritional
specialities.
The Company is interested in inter-
viewing any Filipino students who would
be interested in a 1-yr. trng. prog. in
the States prior to assignment in the
Philippines. Degree in a business relat-
ed subj.-special opening leading to an
assignment in the International Div.
Make appts., Mon., Oct. 14.
Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
-Men & Women-Dec. & May grads.
Seeking students with any major who
are interested in the Graduate Sch. of
Bus. Ad. MBA program.
TUES., OCT. 15-
U.S. Civil Service C oem m i s s i o n-
Throughout U.S.-Men & Women-Dec.,
May & Aug. grads. Seeking Liberal Arts
of all majors for all kinds of positions
with the Federal Govt.
Social Security Admin., Chicago, Ill.
-Men & Women-Dec. & May grads.
Seeking: 1) Claims Examiner Trainee-

All the recruiters from the above
agencies will talk to seniors or grads,
male or female, regardless of degree, to
inform them about the oppor. in the
Fed. Govt. through the FSEE. U.S.
citizenship required.
WED., OCT. 16-
Socony Mobil Oil Co., Inc.-Through-
out the U.S. Men-Dec. & May grads.
Seeking general Liberal Arts, Econ.,
Chem., Geol., Math. for positions in
Merchandising, Mgmt. Trng., Econ.,
Elec. Computing, Transportation, &
Sales Promotion. U.S. citizenship re-
quired.
H. J. Heinz Co., Mich. & Ohio-Men-
Dec. & May grads. Seeking Liberal Arts
majors for Merchandising & Sales. U.S.
citizenship required.
Bureau of the Census, Wash., D.C.-
Men & Women-Dec. & May grads.
Seeking majors in Econ., Bus. Ad., Stat.,
& Math. For positions in Statistics (all
levels), Stat. Analysis & Economist.
THURS., OCT. 17--
Argonne National Laboratory, Ar-
gonne 111. & Idaho Falls, Idaho-Dec.
& May grads-(p.m. only). - Men &
Women. Seeking all levels Math, PhD in
Chem., Biochem. & Physics for posi-
tions in Statistics & Res. & Dev. Non-
citizens must be exceptionally quali-
fied.
Bureau of International Commerce,
Wash., D.C.-Men & Women-Dec. &
May grads, Seeking majors in Econ.,
ForeignrTrade, Bus. Ad., Mktg. & re-
lated subjs. for positions as Economist
& Business Analyst (Trade Specialist,
research & trade promotion). Entrance
level positions are filled through the
FSEE. U.S. citizenship required.
FRI., OCT. 18-
Texaco, Inc., Chicago, I11.-Men-Dec.
& May grads-(p.m. only). Seeking ma-
jors in Econ. & general Liberal Arts
for Marketing of petroleum products,
including service station merchandis-
ing & sales. U.S. citizens.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Cercle Francais, Baratin, Oct. 10, 3-4
p.m., 3050 FB.
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony Meeting, Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m.,
Lower Level, SAB, Room 528D.
Congregational Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Midweek Worship, Oct. 10, 12:10-

Furniture, bookcases, books, chests,
desks; Appliances; Antiques; Musical
instruments. Bought, sold. DARWINS,
2930 S. State. NO 8-7744. F11
SAM AT SDT . . . gum chewing obli-
gates one , . . or did you guess? Ask
the grubby one on sweetest day. She
has eleven walls for- memories. F47
FOR SALE;
One roommate. Slightly used. Best of-
fer accepted. May be inspected be-
tween hours 6-8 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
Call Tom, X 372 S. Quad. F43
Meet The Right People
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of persorllity
appraisal and an IBM system, 14 to
introduce unmarried persons to others
whose background and ideals are
congenial with their own. Interviews
by appointment. Phone after 9 a.m.
NO 2-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
BLUE FLASH - Listen-next time we
have to do a professional job on the
bridge. Security reasons you know.
P42
BETSY:
Where have I gone wrong? Am intelli-
gent, am handsome, am junior, am
English major. WW, X 372 S.Q. F41
The MET-TET is MUSIC. NO 8-6807. F26

341 E. Huron

USED CARS
1963 VW-NO 5-0405. N5
1957 FORD-Excel. mech. cond. Body
and tires very good. $450. NO 2-1291
after 5:30 p.m. N4
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. N50
1929 HUDSON super 6, 4 door sedan.
Call 449-7051. N48
1960 PORSCHE-1600 coupe, absolutely
like new. 5 new tires. NO 2-0280, eve-
nings. N49
1963 BUICK LE SABLE-4-door hard-
top, power brakes and steering, many
extras. Excellent condition, low mile-
age, private owner. HU 2-0405. N37
COMPETITION PREPARED
1963 Sunbeam Alpine: Engine and
trans. just rebuilt; a very competi-
tive race car.
Call Bill Wooding - NO 3-4213. 62
ALFA-ROMEO'S
1964 models on display now. ALSO: 1960
Alfa '2000 roadster, sharp, 28,000 miles,
1959 Alfa Giulietta Spider, black,
radio, nice, $1495. 1958 Alfa, Super
Spider, red, engine overhauled, nice,
$1495.
Overseas Imported Cars inc.
331 S. 4th. 662-2541
N
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Two tickets to the MSU
game. Call NO 5-2519.
PORTABLE STEREO, Motorola. Two
4%" detachable speakers with 10'
cords. One 6" speaker. Excellent con-
dition. Reasonable price. Call NO 3-
9348 between 5 and 7 P.M. Ask for
John W. B27
FOR SALE-Microscope "Zeiss' mono-
cular-binocular, excellent cond. Ph.
542-6431, Detroit. B9
RCA-VICTOR clock-radio for sale. AM,
almost new, works very well. White
with gold numerals. 5-9761, Ext..-104.
Bl

NO 3-203

ANN ARBOR PROFESSIONAL
SERVICE ASSOCIATES
334 Catherine

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
* Computer Technology
-Hardware Design
-Software Research
V Communication Systems
-Propagation Research
--Complex Design
Engineers, Mathematicians, and Physicists
should contact their COLLEGE PLACE-
MENT OFFICER for an dppointment with
an NSA representative. No test required.

B2

MUSICAL. MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GUITARS, ETC.
Make, Repiar, Buy and Sell
Private and Group Instruction.
Hoots Daily
Herb David Guitar Studio
209 S. STATE
NO 5-8001
X1
MISCELLANEOUS
GIVE YOUR TUMMY A TREAT
WITH GOODIES FROM
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night 'til 12
BARGAIN CORNER

SAVE 40c-This ad and $1.60 good for
1 giant 14" cheeze and pepperoni
pizza. Free delivery. Pizza King, 665-
9655 or 665-3800. 1308 S. University.
This offer good thru Thurs., Oct. 10.
F9
We are happy to announce
a new addition to the
bulletin board-A
spanking new 32-A.
Bob M. and the 69ers F40
THANKS DR. REVELLI, but it's brother
Jerry and 8 kids-Al. F29
The MET-TET for the JET-SET. NO
8-6807. 30
MO-FOR heavens sake don't forget to
clean up the room for the Open House
after the Game. Everybody's going
to be there-our room at the Theta
House-you know. Sue. F39
TYPICAL BLIND DATE, girl (hideous
deformed, studious) would like a date
to the U. of D. Hootenanny next Sun.
An old friend of mine is performing.
If interested, call Markley Ext. 5315.

kAM~3ut~AkI lIIv

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan