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September 20, 1963 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-20

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,19'63

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Blue

Victory 'Disappointing'-Elliott

"

4>

I

-Daily-Jim Lines
LEAPING HIGH-John Henderson goes high up in the air to snag
a Blue aerial while White defender Harvey Chapman comes in for
the tackle. Henderson, a 6'3" sophomore end, grabbed several other
passes yesterday as the Blues triumphed, 14-10, over the Whites. It
was the last game-type scrimmage before the real thing comes
along a week from this Saturday when the Wolverines face South-
ern Methodist at Ann Arbor.

By PERRY HOOD
In somewhat of a surprise move1
yesterday, Coach Bump Elliott put
his charges through their last
game-typescrimmage of the sea-
son, in which the first and sec-
ond team Blue Squad earned a
meager 14-10 victory over the
Whites.
Elliott summed up the after-
noon's work saying, "I was pretty
disappointed. We just weren't
sharp today. We didn't move the
ball."
Blue fullback Mel Anthony scor-
ed thesgame-winning touchdown
on a second and five situation
after a Bob Chandler to Jim Con-
ley aerial play brought the Blue
Squad deep into White territory
from their own 48.
The first quarter began slowly
enough with the teams exchanging
punts three times before the White
team began to move from their
own 20-yard line, with senior re-
serve quarterback Denis Alix in
command.
White's Drive
The White squad obtained their
second first down of the game on
a pass play from Alix to end Craig
Kirby to move the ball up to the
38-yard line. On a run and two
successive passes to halfback Bill
Dodd the White team penetrated
deep to the Blue 18. Alix ran with
the ball on the second and third
downs to move it to the 7 and a
first down.
The Blue line finally held for
three downs and on the fourth the
Whites tallied a field goal giving
them the lead.'
Rick Bay kicked off for the
Whites and sophomore John Row-
ser received and ran the ball back
to the Blue 35. With Tom Prichard
at the quarterback slot, the Blues
began their only sustained drive
of the afternoon.
Blues Tally
Prichard connected on two first
down passes, one to end John Hen-
derson and the other to halfback
Bob Quist, to bring the ball to the
White's 29. Just before the quarter
ended, the Blues moved in to the
18.
Two successive rushes brought
the ball to the 12, and on the third
down, John Rowser ran it through
the middle to the 4-yard line and
a first down. Prichard ran to the
right on the first down, and scor-
ed the touchdown. Dodd, kicking
for the Blues, made the conver-
sion.
Fumble-itis
The Whites received the kickoff
and began to move, reaching the
Blue 42 when fumble-itis set in.
The Blues recovered, and fumbled
soon after, but recovered their er-
rant ball.
Quarterback Bob Chandler got
off a pass over the defenders'
heads to Jack Clancy who ran
dow nto the White 21. Neither
Dick Wells nor Mel Anthony could
move the ball past the White wall
on two successive plays. After
Chandler was thrown for a five
yard loss to the 26 on the third
Coach Names
Cheerleaders
This season's cheerleading squad
was announced yesterday by div-
ing coach Dick Kimball, the spon-
sor, and Captain Phil Bolton.
Veterans on the team are Fred
Sanders, Gary Erwin, John Ham-
ilton, and John Candler. New
members of the team are fresh-
men Chip Fuller, Phip Fuller and
John Vinceti.
As in the past, the cheerleading
team will perform at all home and
away football games and all home
basketball games.

down, Dodd again was moved over
to the Blue team to attempt the
field goal, but the ball fell short.
Speedy Drive
The Whites took over on their
own 20, but were forced to punt on
the fourth down. The Blues began
a speedy drive from their own 48,
highlighted by a 40 yard pass play,
Chandler to Conley. Anthony car-
ried on two successive plays over
center to gain the touchdown, with
Bay moving over to make the con-
version for the Blues. The clock
ran out soon after, ending the half.
Shortly before the end of the
third quarter the Blues- worked
down to the White 10 and tried a
field goal which went wide to the
right. The Whites took possession,

and began the longest drive time-
wise, featuring the passing of Pete
Hollis and Alix. The fumble-bug
bit again on the Blue 9 where the
Blues recovered.
Unable to gain ground, the Blues
punted to the White's 44, and the
Whites, under Bay, held the ball
until the end..
Bay connected on three, each
good for a first down, and finally
carried the ball over the goal line
himself with 20 seconds to go.
Dodd kicked the conversion.
"Our blocking wasn't good," said
Elliott. "Defensively we were fair,
but we need more offensive punch.
I didn't expect us to be too sharp
today, but we weren't as sharp as
I had hoped."

Major League Standings

_,

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE1
W L .Pet. GB,
x-New York 100 53 .654 -
Chicago 88 65 .575 12
Y{ Minnesota. 87 68 .561 14
Baltimore 81 73 .526 W%
Detroit 75 78 .590 25
Cleveland 73 81 .474 271.
Boston 73 82 .571 28
Kansas City 69 83 .454 30%
Los Angeles 69 86 .445 32
Washington 53 99 .349 46%/
x-Clinched pennant.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 8, Minnesota 6 (12 inn.)
Los Angeles 7, Baltimore 2
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at 'Detroit
Kansas City at New York (2, t-n)
Los Angeles at Cleveland (n)
Washington at Baltimore (n)
Minnesita at Boston (n)

Los Angeles
St. Louis
San Francisco
Philadelphia
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston
New York

94
91
83
81
81
81
77
72
59
49

59
64
70
72
73
74
77
81
94
104

.614 -
.587 4
.542 11
.529 13
.526 13%
.523 14
.500 17Y2
.471 22
.386 35
.320 45

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

i i
The Thin Man
by Dave Good
The Gift Horse
If Athletic Director H. O. (Fritz) Crisler is looking for a Santa
Claus to help him finance the new basketball arena he wants to
build, he may have a better chance of finding one than Socrates did
of finding an honest man.
Nothing is definite; no plans have been made. But there has
been a lot of talk that Michigan's physical education department
(including intramural sports) may have gained the interest of Vice-
President for Student Affairs James A. Lewis and Vice-President for
Business and Finance Wilbur K. Pierpont. The two administrators
are preparing a report suggesting ways to reorganize extracurricular
activities.
If it is true that physical education has come to their at-
tention, a logical step in their report might be a proposal from
them to bring this department under the supervision of the offices
of Student Affairs and of Business and Finance.
Right now the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics over-
sees and finances the physical education department but does not
have policy authority, over it.
Shifting the Weight..
The major consideration in a forthcoming administrative change
like this one is that the athletic department would be relieved of
financing physical education. The athletic department currently
shells out some $100,000 every year for upkeep and maintenance of
non-intercollegiate sports-a major portion of the financing but as
Crisier puts it, "not the whole ball of wax."
If someone should make an offer to the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics to remove physical education from its re-
sponsibility, the athletic department, which is itself entirely self-
supporting, could then divert this $100,000 toward a farsighted plant-
expansion program.
Crisler declines to predict how the board might receive such a
proposal, but it seems fairly obvious that it would welcome it
wholeheartedly.
The extra $100,000 a year could be just the thing Crisler needs
to see his way clear in pushing the arena through. This and the $12
student athletic coupon are the prime points of interest in some
complicated financing procedures. The background to the problem
is this:
The current sources of finance at the board's disposal have
mushroomed with the inauguration of the athletic coupon this fall
to replace the free book of football tickets. Crisler last spring estimat-
ed that fewer than 50 per cent of the 27,000-odd students here would
purchase the coupons, but with nearly 14,500 sold already, the figure
is already 55 per cent. (Ticket-manager Don Weir has extended the
deadline through this week to accommodate students who registered
late.) The 14,500 coupons represent assets of over $170,000 toward
plant expansion.
Simple Addition .. .
With little imagination, it is easy to see that by combining the
assets which are new this year-$170,000 for student coupons plus
the possible $100,000 freed if the physical education program should
shift out of the athletic department's hands-then the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics would have at its disposal just
over a quarter-million dollars it never had before.
This, coincidentally enough, is just the figure which experts have
advanced as the probable yearly cost of floating a bond issue to bring
the athletic department some three million dollars as the first step
in its plant-expansion program. This would take care of a basketball
arena which could double as a recreation building. Later plans
include facilities for intramurals and physical education. Either the
University proper or the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics,
as an independent corporation, could float a bond issue for this
amount.
Crisler presently is unwilling to speculate on when the board
may decide to order construction of the basketball arena begun;
this depends on a study of total assets. But if the Lewis-Pierpont
report includes a proposal to take the physical education program
off the athletic department's hands, there would seem to be little
reason for delay from the board.
Depending on how ,the Regents react to the study, which is
expected in October or November, the athletic department could
direct work on the basketball arena to be begun sometime later this
year.

PERSONAL
WELCOME to Michigan, Walter Gottlieb.
Fl
DEAR JOHN, Marsha WANTS you. F37
GERMAN MEAT PATTY on rye served
at ROMANOFF'S, at Bell Tower. F26
ONLY A RAVING maniac would give a
turtle a name like Walter. F12
DANCE LESSON registration, Tuesday.
Sept. 24, 7 p.m., at the League. P40
BABYSITTER for hire. E. Ann Arbor.
665-5528. F44
RJAZZFCNSWC
WCBN 650 KC
P13
JOE-Saugatuck was fun but does it
end there? 1110 Maiden Lane, NO 8-
8490. F45
YOU,. TOO, may have a charge account
at the VILLAGE APOTHECARY.
1112 So. University Ave. F
THE NEW Christy Minstrels. P14
IS THAT some kind of a disease? F15
GREEN green... F16
OH! (see today's ad) P17
FORESTRY MAJORS-Prove your bite
is worse than your bark! If you think
you have the University treed, go out
on a limb. Plant your Ideas for reform
in fertile soil at the Conference on
the University. Ask for petitions at
SGC office. F18
POETS:
POETRY material now being con-
sidered for publication in the cam-
pus inter-arts magazine, GENERA-
TION. All material submitted will be
carefully read, criticized, and re-
turned if not used. Manuscripts may
be left at the maf office, Student
Publications Building. First issue in
October.
GENERATION
FOR WOULD-BE BRIDGE FANATICS
and all other persons, too. Bridge les-
sons at the League. Registration Tues-
day, Sept. 24, 7 p.m. F41
1-RM. EFFICIENCY APT. with bath,
automatic awasher and dryer, free
parking. At 1021 E. Huron, NO 5-4767.
C43
ZOOLOGY MAJORS-Don't let the Uni-
versity bug you! Get out of your cell
and form a nucleus of student action.
Cilia as It may sound, the Conference
on the University is fishing for some-
one with your 'scope! Petitions at
SGC office. F19
$1.25
Haircut, Mon. thru Thurs., 347 May-
nard near Arcade. $1.50 Fri. and Sat.
IRAJ-This is your conscience speaking.
I will hound you until you pay your
debt to society! ' F20
TIN CIRCLE is no more
Paper Square forevermore" ,'
'DIAMONDS-Highest quality at com-
petitive prices. Call C. K. Reaver Co.
of Ann Arbor, 300 S. Thayer NO
2,1132. F18
THIS YEAR at the League - Dance
parties every Thursday evening. Come
register, Thurs., Sept. 26 at 7 p.m. at
the League. F22
COUNSELOR! You're harassing the wit-
ness again. F23
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORPORATION -
"Where marginal/prices buy quality
diamonds!".1209;. University. 663-
7151. F73
'WELCOME BACK" - Students' House
Party at the Salvation Army Quarters,
Sunday, Sept. 15, 9 p.m. NO 8-7257.
F7
ATTEITION STUDENTS
Furniture, bookcases, banks, chests,
desks; Appliances: Antiques;'' Musical
instruments. Bought, sold. DARWINS,
2930 S. State. NO 8-7744. F11
Meet The Right People
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
introduce unmarried persons to others
whose background and Ideals are
congenial with their own. Interviews
by appointment. Phone ater 9 a.m.
NO 2-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
{ F

REAL ESTATE
ATTRACTIVE 3-bedroom ranch in ex-
ceptionally nice professional neighbor-
hood. Excellent condition. Trees. Walk
to schools, shopping. Bargain priced
$14,900, 4% 0GI, FHA, or your terms.
NO 2-1743. R2

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Phone NO 2-4786

FOR RENT
PARKING PLACE
Block from Law Quad. $45 per year.
NO 3-7268. C45
DELUXE APT.-TV, air conditioning,
disposal, spacious, campus location.
Call NO 2-1147, noon or after 5. C44
MALE ROOMMATE needed fbr luxury
apt. Foxcroft Apts., 811 S. State, No.
12. Reasonable rent. 665-2719. C41
STUDIO APT.
Newly furnished for one person. Block
from law quad. $70 per mo. includes
private bath and kitchen, all utilities,
and a parking place. NO 3-7268. C46
GRAD STUDENT (1 or 2), to share new
modern apt. 3 blocks froni campus..
453-3287. 012
WANTED-Third girl to sharefurnished
apt. (temp. or perm.) All utilities
except electricity provided. $95 mo.
($32 each) NO 2-7512 after 5:00. C20
BEL-AIR APTS.-1 and 2 bedrooms. All
new, Danish modern furniture. Air-
conditioning, balconies, wall to wall
carpeting. Campus location. 2-5780.
Eves. 2-5140. C24
NEW-LUXURY
Two-bedroom apartment available
because of academic fallouts. Lo-
cated near campus and St. Joseph's
Hospital. Air conditioned, wall to
wall carpeting, and tenant sundeck.
Call Mr. Beyer at 665-8825 days or
eves, 662-7117.
CHARTER REALTY
FINE CAMPUS APARTMENTS
C42
BUSINESS SERVICES
LET US TYPE and reproduce your'
term papers and dissertations (Offset
for reproduction). P1 oto copy, mail-
ings. Gretzingers Business Service,
320 S. Huron, HU 2-0191 J8
VOCAL INSTRUCTION
Singing and Speaking
CAROL F. WESTERMAN
Member of the National Association
Iof Teachers of Singing

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee at Chicago
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Philadelphia at Houston (n)
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles (n)
New York at San Francisco (n)

LINES
2
3
4

I DAY 3 DAYS
.70 1.95
.85 2.40
1.0 2.85

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

715 Granger
NO 8-6584

TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Car pool or riders betwee
Detroit and Ann Arbor, Monday an
Friday. Call 864-0188. a4
WANT RIDE Tuesday and Thurada
from Ypsi to campus to arrive by
am., to leave at 6 P.. Will sar
expenses. Call 483-4452. (1
USED CARS
COLLECTOR'S ITEM? - 1941 Olds, firs
hydramatic, in top running condition
$600 or best offer. Phone NO 3-84
to see.- 3
1959 MERCURY convertible. White
2-4884. N2
'54 FORD, $50. Call 665-7838 between
and 8 P.M. N2
FOR SALE-1961 King Midget sports car
50-60 M.P.G., In city. 6000 miles, egcel
shape. Need money, will sacrifice fo
$385. Call NO 8-7257. N3
1951 FORD-R/H, $75. Call NO 5-9554
PORSCHE '60 Super-Rdstr, excellen
condition, extras. Price: $2,659. Ca
668-7501 after 7:30 p.m. 13
VW CONVERTIBLE with radio. Ehgin
new last fall. Top and brakes e
$700 or best offer. 665-481. N2
'57 MERCURY, blue and white, hardto
sport coupe. Automatic transmissio;
radio. Must sell. 662-8870 after 5. N2
'60 VW SEDAN-Very good conditior
New engine, $995. Can be seen at 527
Geddes or phone HU 2-1772 after 5:3(
'58 MGA convertible. Excellent cond
tion. Wire wheels, white wall tirei
663-6604 after 5:30 p.m. N
1958 PLYMOUTH Belvidere sport coupe
No rust, very good condition. Mus
be seen to be appreciated. $450. a
Rich at NO 2-2793 or A 9-7039. N3
1962 AUSTIN-HEALY '3000-Blue, fu
equipmen, $2495. 1962 MG-A MK.
roadster. radio, luggage rack, nici
$1895. 1961 Austin-Healney Sprit
sharp, hardtop, red, radio, $1425.
Overseas Imported Cars Inc
331 S. 4th. 662-2541
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1958 CUSHMAN Eagle, 8 hp. $180. Ca
NO 8-7148 after 4 p.m. GZI
FOR SALE-1963 Lambretta 150. Bran
new. 900 miles. $325. Call 63-3967. Z
FOR SALE-1962 Honda 305 Super Hawl
Call 2-0050. Reasonable. 'I
HONDA OF ANN ARBOR
1906 Packard Road
665-9281 2
FOR SALE-Bella Motor Scooter, i
new. One of the finest made. Ml
see to appreciate. 665-3291. Z1
FOR SALE-1958 Lambretta 150 in :,
cellent condition, $230. Call NO 8-73
after 7 p.m. ZU
CYCLES & SCOOTERS-BMW-r50-'5
all white, extras. Harley tricycle gre
for campus and winter;' carres
giant luggage compartmet. 'Vespa
Cushmans and Lambrettas. NO 3-171
LAMBRETTA, VESPA, YAMAHO cycl
7 H.P. Your choice, $375 full prie
delivered Ann Arbor. Windshield an
parts mailed C.O.D. DI 1-3197, '$34
W. .8 Mi. Detroit, 3 j blocks Westc
Livernois.
WANTED TO BUY
LOST-Tiny, gold mouse pin in vicinit
of Arcade, State St. or campus. Su
stantial reward. Call FI 9-2992 collec
MISCELLANEOUS
STOCK UP with lots of good food
for your Weekend Party at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night 'til 12
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI's Galore!
"WHITE LEVI'S"
SLIM-ITS
4.49
FOR "GUYS AND DOLLS"
Block, brown, loden,
"white, cactus, light blue..
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

J7 I

r

DEVANEY PIANO SCHOOL-Instruction
by a leading professional pianist, Har-
vard alumnus, former pupil of Net-
zorg, Webster, Sandor; veteran of na-
tionwide engagements with Freddy
Martin's orchestra, including coast-
to-coast radio and recording experi-
ence; erstwhile orchestra leader and
concert soloist at the Palm Beach'
Biltmore; and currently in second
year as musical director for Ann Ar-
bor's Rubayat, broadcasting via
WOIA. 308 Catherine, Ann Arbor. 662-
3735. Scholarships Available.' J6
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Ladies brown raincoat with gold
lining, campus area. 665-0462. A10
LOST-Handknit beige cardigan sweater
at Hillel mixer. If fotmd call 4338
Markley. Reward. A9
HELP WANTED
GIRL FOR PART-TIME WORK-Sat.
noon 'til Sunday evening. 665-0547.
H31
TEACHERS interested in either ele-
mentary or secondary substitute work
are requested to call personnel office,
Romulus TWV schools. WHl-1600. H28
ADVERTISING SOLICITOR with some
experience wanted for local monthly
publication. P.O. Box 474, Ann Arbor.
H24
SUBSCRIPTION SOLICITORS, male or
female for monthly publication. Lib-
eral commission. Ann Arbor Digest.
Phone 668-8758. H25
FOR SALE
USED FURNITURE-Chairs, chests, gas
refrig., etc. NO 2-1443. B12
MUST SELL-2 bookcases, chairs, desk
and bed. Call 668-6063. B6
FOR SALE-Microscope "Zeiss" mono-
cular-binocular, excellent cond. Ph.
542-6431, Detroit. B9
L. 0. SMITH Typewriter-13" super spe-r
cial, Elite type. Perfect cond. $55.
May be seen at 420 Maynard. Ask for
Miss Hilton. 662-3241. B3
HOUSE-Three bedrooms, $14,000, terms
to suit. Lakewood. 115 Highlake, city,
gas heat, full basement, fenced back-
yard, wooded lot, near elementary,
school, lake, shopping center, bus line.
Almn. storm screens - screen porch,
tool shed. NO 5-5839. B15

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CHURCH PLANS
DISCUSSION
The Church was founded as
a body to manifest personal
aspects of God's character. In
this body, God cultivates the
ability to distinguish between
good and evil in a non-mechan-
ical way, and to choose to do
good because its nature is to
love righteousness, truth, and
love.
How can the Church live true
to its fundamental nature in
this generation? In what ways
can the Church manifest the
character of God in a society
which appears to be too absorb-
ed with technological develop-
ment to listen to the voices that
raise, questions concerning its
basic direction?
In discussions held regularly
at the Northside Presbyterian
Church, answers to these and
related questions are sought in
an atmosphere of friendliness
and urgency born out of the
seriousness of the concerns.
The next "Concern Period" at
Northside Presbyterian Church
will be held on Sunday, Sept. 22,
as part of the 10:30 a.m. Wor-
ship Service. The particular

I,

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115 EAST LIBERTY (across from P-Bell)

SUNBEAM
GENERAL
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UNIVERSAL
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Your Student Headquarters
for Small Appliances
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(1) Hairdryers (6) Auto. Frypans
(2) Coffee Makers (7) Heating Pads
(3) Irons (8) Clocks
(4) Blenders (9) Clock Radios
(5) Bean Pots (10) AM-FM Radios
WE SOP OUR COMPFTITIONI

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CORONET
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WEST BEND
rig c~

GRA DUA TE STUDENT
Thursday, Sept. 26, 7:30
1 West Conference Room

FIRST MEETING

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