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September 11, 1963 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMRFR 11. 14"

_

- .a. OJPJJE JGjvin.SS 11,*S1 *UU

hange Dufek's Job
o ImproveDefense

Famed 3M' Back Heston Dies
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (P)- 1900-1904 of varsity, prior to col- ball at San Jose, Calif., Normal
Michigan's great Willie Heston, lege football's no-freshman rule- School where Yost was an assist-
who struck fear into the hearts of is credited in the records with ant coach. Yost got the Michigan
Wolverine football rivals of an- scoring 93 touchdowns and a to- coaching job and took Heston with
other era, is dead at 84. tal of 465 points. him

By PERRY HOOD
With Navy's ace passing quar-
terback, Roger Staubach, due to
perform in Ann Arbor next month,
few can argue that Michigan's de-
fensive secondary must be better
than last year's.
The Wolverines first move in
the direction of bolstering the sec-
ondary was the appointment of
Dennis Fitzgerald as freshman
coach, so that defensive backfield
coach Don Dufek would have a
greater opportunity to work on
pass defense. Then a minor jug-
gling of coaching assignments took
place so that each coach would be
able to specialize more either on
defense or offense.
Same Defense
The net result, however, will
make very little difference in the
type of defensive setup, according
to Coach Dufek. "The defensive
setup will not be drastically chang-
ed from last year's."
Wrestling Team
All candidates for the varsity
and freshman wrestling teams
will meet in the wrestling room
of the Intramural Bldg. today at
4:15 p.m.
The real difference then must
be in the players themselves. Back
this year with more experience are
juniors Dick Rindfuss and Bob
Timberlake, and seniors Tom
Pritchard, Bill Dodd, and Harvey
Chapman.
Timberlake, after having been
moved from quarterback to half-
back last season, was a standout
player on defense, playing a total
of 325 minutes, more than any
other back. This year he has re-
turned to his original position, and
it is hoped that he will not have
to play as much on defense.
Injuries Strike
Chapman has been bothered by
an ankle injury incurred during
the summer, and has-had a slow
start, although he has much ex-
perience. Dodd and Pritchard will
be counted on more in the defense.
Dennis Jones, used extensively
on defense last year, has also been
hampered with injuries this fall.,
He had the flu first, and then in-;
jured his sholder in last Satur-
day's scrimmage.
65 Turn Out
For Football
Frosh Team
About 65 freshmen clad in white
jerseys started practice Monday
under the direction of new fresh-
man coach Dennis Fitzgerald.
The freshman team will con-
tinue five-day a week practices
until sometime in November when
the freshman game will be played.
No date has been set as yet for
the annual game-type scrimmage
which ends freshman fall prac-
tice.
"We have many individuals with
very outstanding talent," said
Fitzgerald. "Our first purpose is
to acquaint the players with the
Michigan style of offense and
defense."
NEW!
CHANEL
-W 5 -SPRAY PERFUME

The big emphasis this season,
however, has been on the play of
many of the sophomores, who have
shown great potential.
John Rowser, a 175-pound half-
back, is expected to shine on de-
fense. "He's an excellent tackler,
and has fine defensive reactions,"
Dufek pointed out. "His speed is
very important." Rowser has been
bothered with a shoulder injury.
this past week but played with the
second team yesterday.
Another sophomore secondary
defenseman will be Jack Clancy, a
190-pound quarterback from De-
troit. Clancy played with the first-
string blue team yesterday. "Clan-
cy is an excellent diagnostician,"
remarked Dufek. "He has a good
nose for the football."
Sygar's Loss Felt
The other blue team halfback
yesterday was sophomore Dick
Wells, moved to that position to
replace injured Rick Sygar, also
a sophomore.
Dufek emphasized the import-
ance of the loss of Sygar to his
defense and to the team. "The loss
of Sygar definitely hurts, espe-
cially on-defense.
Another sophomore, halfback
Dorie Reid, also figures in the de-
fensive plans, Reid is short (5'7"),
but is fast and is a hard tackler.
He also has been bothered with
injuries. "Reid started to do well,
and then was hurt. He will have
to catch up now," said Dufek.
Except for the players, the de-
fense should; be substantially the
same as last year's. "Our prime
objective is to stop the long easy
touchdown pass," explained Dufek.
Dufek's final remark was hopeful.
"We should definitely be better
overall this year."
Jones, Brens
Ineligible
Bill Jones, Purdue's 6'8" center,
became the second center in the
Big Ten conference to be inelig-
ible for scholastic reasons this
week.
In nine games last year, Jones
averaged 14.4 rebounds per game,
with a season's total of 130.
Earlier this week, Wisconsin's
Jack Brens was also announced
scholastically ineligible. Jones and
Brens were considered two of the
conference's best three returning
centers.
Major League
Standings

-Daily-Jim Lines
THE AERIAL BOMB-In an effort to prevent the successful execution of the forward pass by oppo-
sition elevens this year Michigan has moved last year's freshman coach Don Dufek to the new
position of defensive secondary coach. Here Bob Timberlake, 28, gives a defense man's view of
the oncoming aerial in last Saturday's blue-white scrimmage.
MARTIN LEADS WAY:
Cross County Comes Back to '

By CHARLIE TOWLE
Michigan will boast more than
one varsity sport this fall when
cross country returns to the local
sport scene.
The last time Michigan official-
ly collected seven men together to
make a cross country team was in
1958.
With the hiring of Dave Martin,
a distance man, to replace Elmer
Swanson, a hurdler, as assistant
track coach the move back to cross
country seemed imminent. Martin
ran on the '58 team when he was
only a sophomore.
Track Team Staff
This year's cross country con-
sists wholly of members who dur-
ing the winter and spring seasons
make up the track team.
Martin stressed that if any ques-
tion came up on whether to go
all out in cross country or to make
sure the runners were ready for

run the cross country distance,"
he commented, adding that, "it's
a long jump from a half mile to
the four mile distance."
The distance men most likely to
I-M GOLF MEET
The date for the Campus In-
tramural Golf Meet has been
moved to Saturday, Sept. 21, at
7 a.m. for the residence halls
and social fraternities. The
meet for independents and pro
fraternities will be on Sunday,
Sept. 22, at 7 a.m. Participants
should sign up now in the office
at the Intramural Bldg.
be running on the team are Chris
Murray, Dave Hayes and Des Ry-
an. Middle distance men Dorr Cas-
to, Ted Kelly, Dan Hughes and
Cecil Norde are other prospective
members. Jim Austin, a back-up
two miler last year, is also in the
running.
The first meet is scheduled for
Ann Arbor against Bowling Green
State University, Saturday, Sept.
21 at 10 a.m. The meet will be run
over the University Golf Course
on a shortened three mile loop.
Golfers who have had to drag
clubs around the hilly course can
appreciate what the cross coun-
try runners will be up against.
Other Meets
Other meets on the tentative
schedule are a dual meet with

Spring Arbor Junior College, The
Notre Dame Invitational, The
Michigan Federation Meet and
possibly the Big Ten Champion-
ship Meet. In addition, Martin
would like to arrange a meet with
Eastern Michigan University.
Whether or not Michigan will
run in the Big Ten meet depends
on the earlier mentioned criteria,
whether or not it will be harmful
to Michigan's chance for track ti-
ties-
"If we do run it will be for the
competition and the enjoyment,"
says Martin. "We are not interest-
ed in going after the crown."
The last time Michigan ran in
the Big Ten to count was in 1957.
Murray ran in the meet last year
and finished eleventh; but it was
I-M MANAGERS
The Intramural A t h l e t ic
managers' meeting will be held
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Man-
agers of the social fraternities,
independents and professional
fraternities will meet in the
lobby of the I-M Bldg. Resi-
dence halls managers will meet
in the South Lounge of East
Quadrangle.
not to count. To find the time pre-
vious to '57 when Michigan entered
the Big Ten Meet you have to go
back to 1954 when they captured
the title.

Heston, plunging halfback of
Coach Fielding H. (Hurry Up)
Yost's "point a minute" teams 60
years ago and first player outside
the East's Ivy League to make
All-America, died Monday night
in Munson Hospital here. He was
born near Galesburg, Ill., and at-
tended high school at Grants Pass,
Ore.
Ill recently after his many dec-
ades of a vigorous life, Heston
entered the hospital a few days
ago from his Lake Manistee sum-
mer retirement home in northern
Michigan.
The octogenarian, one of the
athletic world's all-time greats,
was ever the champion of an ac-
tive life.
Cutting Back
"I don't run the half mile any
more and I've quit going to
dances," he said not long ago.
"But I smoke seven cigars a day
and I'm having a lot of fun loafing
and living."
Heston leaves his widow, the
former Sarah E. Williams of Bay
City, two sons, John and William
M. Jr., and a daughter, Mrs. Fred
Ritter. Mrs. Heston was his sec-
ond wife. His first wife died.
Six Michigan All-America will
be Heston's pallbearers at funeral
services Friday from the Quer-
feld Funeral Home in Dearborn.
They are Ernie Vick, Jack Blott,
Bennie Oosterbaan, Francis Wis-
tert, Harry Newman and Otto
Pommerening. All Played for
Michigan between 1921 and 1933.
Burial will be in Michigan Mem-
orial Park.
A lawyer by profession, Heston
was a court judge in Detroit for
a time. He served on the
Recorder's criminal Court bench.
Dominated Football in West
Halfback Heston and Yost's tre-
mendous, high-scoring Michigan
teams dominated college football
of the West at the turn of the cen-
tury.
Willie, not an extraordinarily
big man, was recalled by the old-
timers as a fast and hard, crunch-
ing runner who smashed through
opposition when he couldn't out-
speed his rivals.
Heston played football in a time
long before the forward pass and
when brawn and stamina were
the top essentials.
The Heston-Yost combination
was spectacular, contributing many
brilliant chapters to football his-
tory as the Wolverines, "cham-
pions of the West," swept up just
about all in sight.
Willie-who played four years

Twice All-American
The lMte Walter Camp, who
originated the All-America team,
chose Heston to his team twice,
in 1903 and 1904.
In 1903 the choice of Heston
marked the first time anyone out-
side the Ivy League of the East
was named to Camp's team.
Camp's selection of Heston was
a sensation of that time.
Heston first played college foot-

By The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - The San
Francisco Giants set a major
league record last night -- most
brothers in the same lineup.
All three Alou brothers--Felipe,
Matty and Jesus--batted for the
Giants in order in the eighth'
inning.
They went down 1-2-3.
* * *
Coach Quits
FRESNO, Calif. - Cecil Cole-
man, head football coach at Fres-
no State College, one of the na-
tion's perennial small school pow-
ers, said yesterday he will quit
football to devote full time to his
athletic director duties in 1964.
Coleman brings a 33-7 record
into his fifth year as Bulldog
coach.
He coached Fresno State to an
unbeaten season in 1961 that was
called by a 36-6 victory over Bowl-
ing Green in the Mercy Bowl.
* * *
Harris After Second
DES MOINES-Meticulous Lab-
ron Harris, ignoring the soggy go-
ing, moved closer to a second
straight United States Amateur
golf title yesterday with a sub-
par effort few of his rivals could
match.
With the bill of his rarely-used
cap pulled down to keep the rain
and mist off his spectacles, the
hu>ky 21-year-r' Oklahoma State

University matematics s t u d e n
sloshed over Wakonda's hills a
narrow fairways for a 6 and
verdict over John McKey of Or
lando, Fla.
That put the f ending cham-
pion into the first of today's two
18-hole rounds along with 63'
other shotmakers.
* * *
In and Out
ROCHESTER, N.Y.--An appeals
court reserved decision yesterday
on a request by convicted basket-
ball briber Jack Molinas for a
stay of extradition to North Caro-
lina. The southern state has
charged him with basketball fix-I
ing.
The former Columbia University
and pro star asked for the stay
f r o m the Appellate Division,
Fourth Department, of the State
Supreme Court.
Molinas was convicted of brib-
ery in New York last Feb. 11 in
the recent college basketball scan-
dals and was sentenced to 10 to 15
years in prison.
He was released from Attica
State Prison on bail, April 11 on
a certificate of reasonable doubt.
He then was served with a war-
rant, issued in Raleigh, N.C.,
accusing him of attempting to fix
a 1959 basketball game between
North Carolina State and Wake
Forest.

Willie played in the 1903 histor-
ic 6-6 tie with Minnesota from
which grew the hallowed "Little
Brown Jug" rivalry.
So enraptured were Minnesota's
"Giants of the North'' over hold-
ing Michigan to the tie that they
swiped the Wolverines' water jug
from the visitors' bench.
The jug then became the tra-
ditional prize of the winner of that
game each year.

N
1

SPORTS SHORTS:
Giants Set New Record:
Most Alous in an Inning

PERRY PUT ON WAIVERS:

Veterans Fall in Final NFL Cutdown

AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York
Chicago
Minnesota
Baltimore
Detroit
x-Boston
Cleveland
Kansas City
x-Los Angeles
Washington
x--Playing night

WV L
95 51
82 65
82 64
78 69
72 74
70 76
70 77
67 78
64 82
52 95
game.

Pet. GB
.651 -
.558 13/
.562 13
.530 171/z
.493 23
.470 25%,
.476 26
.462 271/2
,438 31x/2
.354 431f2

By The Associated Press
Old Joe Perry, who has run
more often and for more yardage
than anyone else in National Foot-
ball League history, got his walk-
ing papers yesterday.
The 36-year-old veteran of 15
professional seasons was placed
on waivers by the Baltimore Colts
as the league's teams made their
final mandatory cuts to 37-man
rosters for this weekend's opening'
day games.
Some other veterans involved in
last-day maneuvering included

long - time Canadian Fodtball
League quarterback Sammy Etch-
everry, signed by the San Fran-
cisco 49ers; place kicking special-
ist Jim Martin, traded by Detroit
to Baltimore; Philadelphia Eagle
tackle Jim McCusker, placed on
waivers; San Francisco guard
Mike Magac, placed on injured
waivers, and Dallas defensive
back Jerry Norton and fullback
Mal Hammack, placed on waivers.
Perry was the All-League full-
back in 1953 and 1954 when he led

the circuit in rushing. His NFL
career record, for 13 years, is
1,713 carriers in 144 ga'mes for 8,-
280 yards, an average of 4.83.
. Etcheverry, 33, played 11 sea-
sons with Montreal of the Cana-
dian League before going to St.
Louis. He was cut by the Cardinals
earlier this year.
To make room for him and to
reach the limit, the 49ers put Ma-
gac, a four-year man, along with
defensive halfback Jerry Mertens
on the injured list and asked waiv-
ers on two others.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 2, New York 0
Boston at Los Angeles (inc.)
Minnesota 5, Cleveland 4
Baltimore 2, Chicago 1
Washington 9, Detroit 0
Detroit 4, Washington 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Los Angeles (n)
New York at Kansas City (n)
Baltimore at Chicago (n)
Cleveland at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Washington (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

5 - _________I 0000000000-

r

Los Angeles
St. Louis
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston
New York

W
87
85
84
78
76
77
74
69
53
48

L
57
61
66
68
69
72
71
75
92
97

Pet. GB
.608 -
.572 3
.548 8
.538 91/2
.524 11 ,4
.517 12Y,4
.510 13Y24
.479 18
.366 34 ,4
.324 39Y2

CHRIS MURRAY
.. takes to the hills

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 4, San Francisco 2
Philadelphia 16, Houston 0
Los Angeles 4, Pittsburgh 2
Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 3
Chicago 10, St. Louis 8
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (n)
Chicago at St. Louis (n)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (n)
San Francisco at New York (n)
Houston at Philadelphia (n)
Distinctive
Haircutting
FOR PEOPLE WHO CAREI!
* 8 Hairstylists
r Air Conditioned
try
Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theater

the track season cross country
would have to take a back seat.
"We have the European philos-
ophy towards cross country," Mar-
tin said. "They view cross country
as only a means of getting ready
for the track season.' g
I-M Officials
There Will be a meeting of all
men interested in officiating
I-M touch football at the In-
tramuralySports Bldg. at 5:00
Thursday.
To fill the squad Martin is
counting most heavily on the dis-
tance men, one milers and two
milers, with help from the half
milers.
More Prepared
"Naturally the longer distance
men are more mentally ready to
f

at
NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S
MODERN ANSWERS TO THE
a-
CLAMU
FOR
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a.
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