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September 08, 1963 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-08

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Blue

Slips

Past

White

Squad,

32-30
Froehling
Last U.S.

Evashevski, Hollis Lead
Red Shirt's Revolution

By CHARLIE TOWLE
Michigan's first three strings
"blue" team came close to setting
themselves up for the biggest up-
set seen in Michigan Stadium his-
tory but fought back to take a
32-30 win over their lower echelon
brothers of the, "white" team.
Os it was a blocked punt-
which rslled out of the end zone
for a safety was all the margin the
"blues" could boast.
The scrimmage started out as if
it were going to go by the book
as the blue squad hit for two
quick touchdowns.
Starting their first drive on the
twenty, Bob Timberlake engineer-
ed a drive which got most of its
power from the hard running of
fullback Mel Anthony and the
quarterback options of Timberlake,
the drive covered eighty yards in
fourteen yards.
Final Two
Timberlake covered .the final
two yards on a dive and then hit
freshly elevated to the first string
halfback Dick Wells off the option
play for two points.
The second six-pointer came on
a wide sweep by Wells off anoth-
er long and grimly obvious drive
of fourteen plays. This time, how-
ever, most of the spark for the
drive 'came from Wells and his
running mate at halfback Jack
Clancy.
Timberlake added the two bon-
us points on a rollout and with
that a long grey afternoon began
for the "blue"squad.
Leader of the People
Frosty Evashevski took over the
helm of the "whites" from Rick
Bay and started picking apart the
"blue" secondary with passes.
Evashevski seemed to convince the
"white" squad that it was not
there just to be a doormat by lead-
ing a "white" drive over the aerial
route which was culminated with
a 25-yard bombshell to Tom Brig-
stock for the TD.
And, bombshell it was. The re-
verberations seemed to wake the
prviously uninterested "white"
bench into a beehive of holler guys.

Meanwhile, the "blue" squad
seemed to slip into a deep trance.
Before they awoke the "white"
squad had hit for two more touch-
downs and a 22-16 edge.
Led by quarterback Pete Hollis
the "white" squad stuck to the
air most of the way.
Line Play Shines.
Hollis also connected on passes
for the two-pointers, the first to
Tom Molheuk and the second to
Kirby. A large part of the credit
for the success of the "white"
squad was due to the outstanding
effort of the "white" squad's in-
terior linemen. Hollis merely had
to sit back in the pocket of line-
men and wait for one of his re-
ceivers to shake loose.
The "blue" squad showed sign of
coming back alive when Timber-
lake hit on two quick passes to end
John Henderson and two more
quick ones to halfback Harv
Chapman but the drive was stop-
ped by the clock at half time.
The second half scoring opened
with the fatal safety by the "blue"
line off end Molheuk. That made
the score 22-18.
'Blue' Comes Back
"Blue" then got the ball and
after an exchange of punts drove
in to score on an excellently exe-
cuted sweep which allowed Clancy
to trot into the end zone untouch-
ed. The extra point ffort failed
but the "blue" squad was back into
the lead 24-16.
"White" wasn't through yet,
however. The call went out for
Evashevski, again, and the well
liked quarterback again displayed
the best passing form of any of
the hurlers present as he hit Brig-
stock on a duplicate to his first
TD pass.
A roughing the kicker penalty
started the "blue" team off on its
final drive. Most of the ground.
was covered by Bob Quist on a 25-
yard dash off the left end. After
an exchange of fumbles inside the
"white's" five, Wayne Sparkman
bulled over twice, once for the
touchdown and once for the two
extra points to end the contest.

-Daily-Jim Lin 3s
LITTLE MEN SHINE-"White" squad quarterback Denis Alix breaks away from the line late in yester-
day's pre-season scrimmage. Alix and his fellow "white" team quarterbacks Frosty Evashevski, Pete
Hollis, and Rick Bay kept the "blue" team secondary busy all afternoon as well as personnaly lug-
ging the ball for good yardage. In pursuit of Alix is John Marcum (61) while a fellow "white" team-
mate tries to get in a helping elbow.
JAPANESE TOUR:
Five Meets, Five Wins Raise
U.S. OlympicSwim Hopes

Hopeful
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. () -
Mexico's agile Rafael Osuna up-
set top-seeded Chuck McKinley
6-4, 6-4, 10-8 and beanpole Frank
Froehling of Coral Gables, Fla.,
ended the Cinderella story of Bra-
zil's Ronnie Barnes 6-3, 6-1, 6-4
yesterday for men's finalist spots
in the National Tennis Champion-
ships.
Thus it's Froehling's divot-dig-
ging cannonball service against
Osuna's cat-like quickness and
volleying wizardry in the title bat-
tle today at the West Side tennis
club.
History in Making
Regardless of which one wins,
tennis history will be made.
No Mexican has even won the
U.S. title. The United States has-
not had a home-grown champion
since 1955-just before Australia
began an eight-year monopoly.
The women's crown is certain
to be carried to a foreign country.
Bueno and Smith
The finalists are top-seeded
Margaret Smith, seeking to add
the U.S. crown to her Australian
and Wimbledon championships,
and Maria Bueno of Brazil, once
the queen of all tennis before a
siege of hepatitis hindered her
career.
Miss Smith, powerful, 5-foot-10
factory foreman's daughter from
the little Australian town of Al-
bury in New South Wales, needed
only 39 minutes in erasing un-
seeded Dedre Catt of England 6-2,
6-0.
The dour-business-like Miss
Bueno, winner here in 1959, staged
two strong rallies to turn back
the scrappy British Wightman Cup
veteran, left-handed Ann Hav-
don Jones, 1-6, 6-3, 9-7.

INFORMATION ON
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
The Graduate School announces an open
meeting for undergraduate and graduate
students interested in graduate fellowships
for 1964-65.
Campus faculty representatives will explain
the major fellowship programs including:
University of Michigan Fellowships,
National Defense Education Act,
Rhodes, Marshall, Danforth,
National Science Foundation,
Woodrow Wilson, Fulbright-Hays,
and others
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17
3:30 P.M.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE

==

i

SEN IORS
(and all other students
receiving degrees in
December, May or August)
SIGN UP NOW FOR YOUR
SENIOR PICTURE
in the MICHIGANENSIAN

By MARK BENDER
When the U.S. swimming teamt
invades Japan next summer for'
the 1964 Olympic Games, the squad
will undoubtedly boast the finest
array of swimmers ever assembled.I
It'll be smooth sailing all the
way for the American, splashers
Cheerleaders?
Tryouts for the Michigan
cheerleaders will be held this
week, Monday through Friday
(Sept. 9-13) at the main gym-
nasium at the Intramural
Building. The tryouts will be
held from 3:40-4:30 p.m.
if they display the same prowess
next summer as they did on their'
recent tour of Japan. In five con-
secutive meets, three of them ex-'
hibitions, the youthful American
squad, although pitted against an
outstanding group of Japanese
swimmers, romped to five easy
victories.
To be sure, these victories can-
not be attributed to luck. Neither
did the outcome cause much of a
stir in the swimming world. Even
to the people of Japan, where
swimming is the national sport
and its participants are treaated
as national heroes there could be
no doubt; their team was clearly
outclassed.
Early Starts
The superb performance can be
explained in two words: hard work.
American swimmers begin their
competitive careers at an early
age. In many parts of the coun-
try, youngsters who show promise
in the water receive top coaching
long before they reach college, or
even high school.
An even more important factor
is the long hours of grueling prac-
tice every top-flight swimmer

spends in the pool each day. In
the words of Indiana swim coach
"Doc" Councilman, "hurt, pain,
agony, the ultimate in stress
without physical damage" is the
key to training.
Perhaps another reason for the
American team's recent success
was the experience they gained
from working as a team in the Pan
American Games in Sao Paulo,
Brazil last spring. The team that
made the trip to Japan was com-
posed virtually of the same swim-
mers that landed the United States
on top in Brazil.
Wolverines Star
Several University of Michigan
swimmers were outstanding dur-
ing the Japan tour. Freshman Carl
Robie twice lowered the existing
world record, held by Kevin Ber-
ry of Australia, in the 200 m. but-
terfly. Robie's victory in the 400 m.
individual medley over top Japa-

nese tankman Shigso Fukishima
was considered an upset.
Ed Bartsch captured a second
place in the 200 m. backstroke
while distance freestyler Bill Far-
ley proved more than equal to the
Japanese competition but was
beaten out consistently by two of
his teammates, Roy Saari and Don
Schollander.
Robie, Bartsch and Farley will
hopefully add a strong punch to
the American bid to walk off with
the Olympic swimming champion-
ship come next summer.

I

Major League
Standin gs

I

I

AMERICA

New York
Minnesota
Chicago
Baltimore
Detroit
Cleveland
Boston
Kansas City
Los Angeles
Washington

.N LEAGUE
W L P
94 49 .6
80 62 .
79 64 .
77 67 .
69 72.
69 76 .4
68 76 .
64 78 .4
r 64 80 A
51 91 .

ct. GB
657 -
563 13%
552 15
535 17%
.89 24
476 26
472 26%
451 29%
144 301
.359 42 j

r

-Daily-Jim Lines
LIKES THE OPTION-Bob Timberlake (28) cuts back on the
option play with only one man to beat Craig Kirby (84). Kirby
was outstanding yesterday as a favorite receiver of the "white"
team quarterbacks. Hurrying up to the line to help out are Tom
Keating (79) followed by Don Blanchard (59).
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Soccer Club
Entertains
Detroit Here
The Wolverine Soccer Club plays
their final home game until Oc-
tober 6 today at German Park on
Pontiac Trail.
The game against the Panther
Soccer club of Detroit is sched-
uled for 2:30 p.m.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 11, Detroit 6
Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 (12 inn.)
Cleveland 9, Washington 2
Kansas City 5, Los Tngeles 2
Boston 4, Baltimore 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Los Angeles
Detroit at New York
Minnesota at Chicago (2)
Boston at Baltimore
Cleveland at washington
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Los Angeles 86 56 .606 -
St. Louis 82 61 .573 4%
Milwaukee 77 65 .542 9
San Francisco 77 66 .538 9Y
Philadelphia 75 67 .528 10
Cincinnati 76 69 .524 111%
Chicago 74 68 .521 12
Pittsburgh 69 73 .486 17
Houston 52 91 .364 34%
New York 45 97 .317 41
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 3
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 5
Milwaukee 6, Philadelphia 4 (10 inn.)
Cincinnati 4, New York 2
Houston 2, Chicago 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at San Francisco
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Houston (n)
New York at Cincinnati
Milwaukee at Philadelphia

NEJAC

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