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September 07, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN UfAITX

CA rVV"MV4kA'WT CtT IMInVUArV 'JMV% &A 4*%-

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- i ~ .. lei . Vu l V f11 L ., 1 SATURDJAY,

SEPTEkMBER '7, 1963

i

ofensive Unit Is Getting Stronger

Board Includes Sports Arena
In $8 Million Building Plan

By PERRY HOOD
ite the number of minor'
s so far this year, Coach
Elliott is still optimistic'
ng this year's defensive
should be stronger than

last year. We have more defensive
depth," Elliott commented.
Line coach Bob Hollway went
into more detail on the subject,
"We've been trying to improve
the individuals through drills so

far. The defense hasn't been test-
ed in scrimmage yet."
The first test for the defense
will come today in the first full-
scale scrimmage of the season. The
line seemed solid to the coaches,
but Hollway emphasized the line-
backing problem.
"This year we've started using
fullbacks and centers as lineback-
ers, after having used guards be-
fore. We need better linebacking
to improve over last year."
Mel Anthony, a junior fullback.
playing with the first team, and
Tom Cecchini, first string center,
have taken over the new assign-
ment. The defensive backfield
also includes sophomore John
Rowser, presently suffering with
a pinched nerve ailment; and Dick
Refs Needed
There will be a meeting held
at the Intremural Sports Bldg.
at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12,
for all men interested in offi-
ciating I-M touch football
games.
Wells, recently moved to right half
to replace injured Rick Sygar.
Sophomores
Coach Hollway remarked that
"the work of the sophomores is

particularly gratifying." Proof of
the statement is the fact that
three sophomores are playing with
the first team. "Chuck Dehlin is
also coming along as a linebacker.
Ken Wright has some potential on
defense, but has been slowed up
lately by minor injuries."
Hollway's final comment was,
however, that "linebacking is still
a real question mark."
Depth
The starting defensive line has
had :nore experience, and is es-
pecially deep this year. Elliott re-
peatedly stressed the element of
depth this year as opposed to last
year. "Tom Keating has exper-
ience and has performed well this
year." Big Bill Yearby is the only
sophomore on the first line.
The team went through relative-
ly light drills yesterday in prepa-
ration for today's scrimmage, 1:30
p.m. at the Stadium. Being the
first scrimmage of the fall, it will
be the first real test of the team's
unity.
The minor injury list is still
somewhat long, however, as start-
ing end Bill Laskey did rot prac-
tice due to a cold; and John Hout-
man has had the flu. John Mark-
ham also has been bothered by
minor injuries as has end Jim
Conley.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first article in a series on various
aspects of the athletic expansion
program of the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics.)
By TOM WEINBERG
Last spring the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics an-
nounced its plan to charge stu-
dents $12 for athletic coupons in
order to finance a long-range
multi - million dollar expansion
project.
The expansion plan entails more
than just replacing musty Yost
Field House with a new basketball
arena. "The basketball arena is
the most immediate need, but it is
far from the only project we will
work on," commented Dean Steph-
en Spurr, chairman of the Plant
Expansion Committee of the Board
in Control.
Intramural Additions
Spurr went on to say that in-
cluded in the plans are "added
facilities for intramurals, expan-
sion of the physical education
plants for both men and women,
and increased recreation oppor-
tunities on both the central and
north campuses."
Since the initial announcement
last May, the Board has made
little progress. Before any specific

method for financing the expan-I
sion can be utilized, the needs
must be clearly outlined and the
exact specifications of the pro-
posed expansion muss be clarified.
The Board has authorized hir-
ing preliminaryarchitects to start
working out the details, and ac-
cording to Spurr, "the next step
is to zero in on the exact size,
location and type of structure that
we want to build and to get pro-
fessional help on our layout prob-
lems."
$8 Million Project
When the Board first disclosed
its plans, the estimated cost of the
entire project was approximately
$8 million. "The basketball arena
is not going to be a multi-purpose
building such as the $14 million
mushroom at the University of
Illinois," Spurr disclosed. "The
cost of the arena is estimated to
be in the neighborhood of $21/ to
$3% million.
"The exact specifications of the
new arena are uncertain, but the
committee and the University
architect, Lynn Fry, have studied
many new structures across the
country," Spurr went on to say.
country, including the one at the
The exact location of the new
arena and whether or not the

locker room and parking facilities
for the Michigan Stadium will be
able to be used for it remain un-
certain pending the recomnienda-
tions of the architects.
Plans by November
The proposed arena was orig-
inally conceived to be ready for
the 1964-65 basketball season.
Spurr made a statement as to
definite immediate goals when he
said that "by the time this (the
1963-64) basketball season is un-
derway, we should know what
type of structure we want to build,
how big it will be, where it will
be, and approximately how much
it will cost."
The plans for expansion other
than the new field house as orig-
inally disclosed by the Board
would include an addition to
Ferry Field for intramurals and
co-recreational facilities in the
women's pool area.
The plans for financing hinge
on the amount of money required
to complete the various parts of
the plan. The possibility exists
that the University will float a
bond issue to raise the necessary
funds, but the Board in Control,
an in de p e n d e nt organization,
could float its own bond issue and
raise the funds on its own.

I
I
I

t

DICK HONIG
...coach

QOM-The first two teams lineup during a scrimmage practice
week at Ferry Field. Coach Bump Elliott has been pleased
h his defensive line which he rates as quite improved from
years.

OMEN'S HOCKEY:
Practice Begins for Michigan

By BILL BULLARD
This will be a banner year for
men's field hockey in this coun-
- as the International of
omen's Hockey Associations is
lding its quadrennial conference
d tournament at Goucher Col-
e, near Baltimore.
[he only other conclave held in
United States was at Phila-
phia in 1936. Major interest for
Ann Arbor area involves the
t that two of the foreign teams

competing in the tournament at
Goucher will be matched against
local teams later this month.
Local Play
Trinidad is scheduled to play
Ann Arbor and Germany will op-
pose Great Lakes at Palmer Field
on Sept. 22. This is four days
after the 17-nation tournament at
Goucher concludes. The Ann Ar-
bor team includes just local girls
but Great Lakes is composed of
all-stars from the midwest region.

Palmer Still Ailing
As Series Begins

AKRON, Ohio (M)-Bob Char-
les, the lanky longshot from New
Zealand, led yesterday's final
practice session for the $75,000
World Series of Golf with a two-
under-par 68 at the Firestone
Country Club course where the
36-hole showdown begins today.
U.S. Open champion, Julius
Ciney's Star
Badly Inured
CINCINNATI P) - Outfielder
Frank Robinson, who was spiked
in the sixth inning of last night's
Cincinnati Reds-New York Mets
game, may be out for the rest of
the season.
Dr. Richard Rohde, the Reds
trainer, said the three-time Na-
tional L3ague slugging champion's
left bicep was pierced by the spike
of Mtiets second baseman Ron
Hunt. Dr. Rohde said he'll be out
for more than a week.

Boros, had a 69. No. 1 money win-
ner Arnold Palmer 73 and Mas-
ters PGA champion Jack Nick-
laus 75.
Even Par
In two days of practice, the 43-
year-oldBoros had a 36-hole total
of 137. Charles 143, and Nicklaus
144. Palmer had picked up on one
hole during Thursday's practice
round but was even par for the
17 holes he completed.
Charles said after his round he
still thought the 7,165-yard Fire-
stone course was built primarily
for power-hitters and was much
too long for him.
Nothing But Money
Palmer, moving toward the cli-
max of a trouble-plagued year in
which he's won nothing but
money, will give his ailing shoul-
der the supreme test today.
Boros holed two shots from
sand traps during his round yes-
terday and quipped "with my'
luck, I probably won't get into
the sand tmorrow."

The Women's Physical Educa-
tion Club, an organization of phy-
sical education majors, is spon-
soring a tea for the foreign vis-
itors after the two matches. Then
the German team will move on to
Kalamazoo where it will face an
all-star Michigan team including
Margie Bloom and Marilyn Brown.
These two players were main-
stays on the Michigan team that
compiled a 3-0-1 record last sea-
son. The lone tie was against Mich-
igan State and a rematch this
season is assured.
Other tentative games will be
with Eastern Michigan, Western
Michigan, Albion, and Bowling
Gteen. Definite dates have not yet
been arranged but all. home games
usually start at 3:30 Friday after-
noons at Palmer Field.
Practice
Practice for the Michigan team
begins Monday afternoon. Coach
Pat Daugert will have her charges
sharpening up their skills every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
from 4-6 p.m. after that. Any girl
interested in joining the team
should contact Coach Daugert or
any member of the team.
Last season the team had about
25 or 30 members. Since two teams
of 11 players each are needed for
practice, a large squad is again
necessary. Coach Daugert plays
her top 11 in the varsity games
and then has her next 11 best
players compete in the junior var-
sity game that follows all varsity
games.
Rules
Each game consists of two 30
minute halfs with a ten minute
break in between. There is little
substitution so the girls usually
must play the full 60 minutes.
Five players form the line which
consists of a left and right wing,
a left and right inner, and a cen-
ter forward. Three halfbacks,two
fullbacks and a goalie complete
the team.
The game is basically much like
ice hockey or soccer. On a field
100 feet long and 60 feet wide,
each team tries to hit the ball into
the other's net.
All goals must be made from a
semi-circular area in front of the
net. One major rule is that no
stick can be raised above the
shoulder.
STRAIGHT RAIL;
3 CUSHION; POCKET;
SNOOKER
AND TABLE TENNIS
BILLIARD ROOM,
MICHIGAN UNION
10:30 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Sorry girls-men only

BIG TEN:
Teams Have
Heavy Drills
By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS-Woody Hayes will
know more after his Ohio State
football candidates hold their first
scrimmage today, but he has his
eye on a prospective fullback with
qualities in the tradition of past
Buckeye line busters.
The prospect is 212-pound Wil-
lard Sander of Cincinnati. He's
showed hard-driving qualities and
the same speed and ability that
marked him as a freshman.
* * *
LAFAYETTE - Hard - hitting
senior fullback Gene Donaldson
was lost to Purdue's football squad
yesterday for about two weeks be-
cause of a shoulder injury suffer-
ed in a defensive drill.
Donaldson was the Boilermak-
ers' second best ground-gainer
last year with a 5.41 yard average
per carry.
MADISON - Wisconsin football
Coach Milt Bruhn tested his
Badgers in a contact workout yes-
terday as the defending Big Ten
champions prepared for their first
game-type scrimmage today.
Veteran tackle Andy Wodjula
returned to contact work after be-
ing sidelined with a chest bruise.
Senior guard Dion Kepthorne was
out of action with a back injury.
CHAMPAIGN -The University
of Illinois' football squad will
engage in its first game-type
scrimmage today and it may go
far towards determining the shape
of the 1963 Illini varsity.
"We need scrimmage and film
reviews to start evaluating our
personnel," Coach Pete Elliott
said yesterday. "Saturday's com-
petition will enable us to make
some decisions on positions."

Name Honig
As Assistant
Dick Honig, one of the finest
shortstops in University ofsMichi-
gan diamond history, has been
named to assist Head Coach Moby
Benedict with the Wolverine dia-
mond squad.
The appointment was confirmed
last night by the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics and
announced by Athletic Director
Fritz Crisler.
The 21-year-old Honig compet-
ed in football, basketball and base-
ball at McKenzie High School in
Detroit. He is a native of Farming-
ton and a graduate of the College
of Education. He also is current-
ly studying for his master's de-
gree in education
Honig was a key figure as the
Wolverines won the NCAA and
College World Series titles two
years ago. Collaborating with sec-
ond baseman Joe Jones, he figured
in the 60 double plays the Maize
and Blue team amassed that year.
In all he earned three diamond let-
ters although his college career
was cut short the past season by a
broken wrist.

.r
a

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI-Willie Mays, the
San Francisco Giant star whose
all-out play caused him to be
sidelined again by exhaustion, has
won the National League Player
of the, Month for August.
The league office announced
Mays' selection by writers and
broadcasters yesterday. It was the
third time Mays has won it since
the award was started in 1958.
Mays hit .387 during August,

Big Ten Talent Chart
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Below is the table of the number of Big Ten football
players from various surrounding states. The chart refers to Bill Bullard's
article which appeared in The Daily Thursday.)

drove in 27 runs in 28 games and
hit eight home runs.
The $100,000 center fielder col-
lapsed on Labor Day from ex-
haustion in a game with Chicago.
Mays was due to return to the
lineup Friday night when Los An-
geles played the Giants.
Mays earned 23 votes in the
monthly award, while his nearest
rival, southpaw Warren Spahn of
Milwaukee had 14.
* * *
ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis foot-
ball Cardinals placed running
back John David Crow on the dis-
abled list Friday. Crow will not be
able to return to the club roster
until Oct. 6.
Crow suffered torn ligaments in
his knee during an exhibition
game against the Chicago Bears.
* * *
PITTSBURGH-Dick Groat of
the St. Louis Cardinals, the Na-
tional League's leading batter, was
taken to the hospital after being

hit in the ribs by a pitch in the
opening game of last night's
doubleheader against the Pitts-
burgh Pirates.
Groat, batting .328, was plunked
on the lower left side by Don
Cardwell as the second man up
in the first inning. The veteran
shortstop was replaced by Dal
Maxvill, and taken to University-
Presbyterian Hospital for X-rays.
* * *
MADISON-Wisconsin's basket-
ball fortunes suffered a severe
blow yesterday when the team's
top scorer and rebounder, Jack
Brens, was dropped from school
because of scholastic difficulties.
Brens, a 6-8 senior from St.
Charles, Ill., accounted for 425
points in 24 games last season and
pulled down 306 rebounds. He was
dropped from the college of let-
ters and science for allowing his
grades to fall below the C level.
Coach John Erickson said there
is "no chance at all' that Brens
could regain eligibility.

SPORTS SHORTS:
Mays Wins 'Valuable' Award

9
I

1.
_a

SCHOOL
Michigan
Michigan State
Ohio State
Purdue
Indiana
Illinois
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Totals

Ill Ohio Mich Minn Wis Pa Ind la NY NJ Other Ttis.

11
9
1
22
10
65
29
23
14

23
7
57
14
15
2
23
1

41
39
4
5
17

1
11
5
31
3

li

3 - 2.
9 1-
5 - -
5 11 -
7 15 -
- 2-
-- 6 -
- 3 4
3 - 1
6 1 29

1
3
2'
2
3
z
1
3

1
1
4
3
2

6
6
8
9
2
5
14
6

83
75
65
74
76
80
73
70
80
79

'v

V
I

2
4
59

184 142 106 65 51 48 39 36 17 11 56 755

Other states and areas represented in the Big Ten: Texas, 6; Kentucky and
North Carolina, 5 each; Missouri, 4; California, Louisiana, West Virginia and
Massachusetts,3 each; Connecticut, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, South Da-
kota and District of Columbia, 2 each; North Dakota, Canal Zone, Mississippi,
Nebraska, Vermont, South Carolina, Virginia, Hawaii and Montana.
WANTED
FRESHMAN CLIPPINGS
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Basement of Michigan Pharmacy
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4

I

Major League Standings

I

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
s Angeles 86 55 .610
. Louis 81 61 .570
ilwaukee 76 65 .536
m Francisco 76 66 .535:
iladelphia 75 66 .532:
icago 74 67 .525:
ncinnati 75 69 .521
;tsburgh 69 72 .489:
uston 51 91 .359:
w York 45 96 .319'
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
. Louis 5-0, Pittsburgh 1-5
Iwaukee 5, Philadelphia 0
w York 5, Cincinnati 4
Icago 3, Houston 0
s Angeles 5, San Francisco 2
TODAY'S GAMES
s Angeles at San Francisco
icago at Houston (n)
, Louis at Pittsburgh
ilwaukee at Philadelphia (n)
w York at Cincinnati (n)

GB
5'/x
10
11
12
12Y2
17
35
41

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
New York 93 49 .655 -
Minnesota 79 61 .507 13
Chicago 79 63 .556 14
Baltimore 77 66 .535 16]
Detroit 69 71 .493 23
Cleveland 68 76 .473 26
Boston 67 76 .468 26%
Kansas City 63 78 .444 291/2
Los Angeles 63 79 .443 34
Washington 51 90 .362 45%
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 9, Chicago 8
Washington 7, Cleveland 2
New York 2, Detroit 1
Baltimore 6-4, Boston 4-2
Los Angeles 4, Kansas City 3 (14 inn.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Los Angeles (n)
Minnesota at Chicago
Cleveland at Washington (n)
Detroit at New York
Boston at Baltimore (n)

I

I

I

The

,

Ranger and Roilfast

e P
4
The Phi T au's cordially invite

FIRST SEMESTER FRESHMEN!
The Men of Phi Kappa Tau
URGE you to Rush .. .
But we advise you NOT
to pledge this semester
0 THIS YEAR the University has more to offer the student than
ever before. As first semester Freshmen, you haven't had time,
in the two weeks you've been here, to explore all the opportunities
open to you.
0 FRATERNITIES at the University offer a unique experience in
responsibility and community living, but fraternities can be de-
manding and time consuming. And if you pledge now, you may
not find the time to see the rest of the University.
0 SO, the Men of Phi Kappa Tau, the University's dynamic new
concept in fraternity living, advise you to rush now-but see what
else the University has to offer before you pledge.

t

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$3395

Please come in for a $3.00 refund

if you bought your Ranger
at BEAVER'S at the oricinal pr

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