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September 04, 1963 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TIlE MIChIGAN flAllY - - ~? ~ --- . - - - -

SEPTEMBER .1963 ~b

N--$100 Million in Debt--Looks for Funds

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

i

Bowdoin Develops Center for Seniors

By MAX HARRELSON.
ssociated Press News Analyst
TED NATIONS (P)-Diplo-
are getting ready for anoth-
at trying to straighten out
iited Nations financial mess.
y agree the prospects are
grim.
big problem is what to do
the UN deficit. It is well
U.S. Share I

u 4'

UNITED NATIONS (P)--The
nited States, through assess-
ents and voluntary contribu-
ns, has provided 48 per cent
the money spent by the
nited Nations in financing its
o big peace-keeping opera-
Ms.
From 1960 through 1962 the
nited States paid $114 million
w a r d the UN's military
:dget in the Congo. Of this,
3 million was in assessments
id $40 million in voluntary
ntributions. The U n i t e d
ates also gave an additional
8 million foi economic aid in
e Congo.
In the Middle East opera-
in, the United States paid $30
illion in assessments from
57 through 1962 and an addi-
nal $22 million in voluntary
utributions for a total of $53
illio'n during the six-year

above $100 million and soaring.
Secretary-General U Thant has
put a priority tag on the issue in
the General Assembly session
opening Sept. 17.
Threaten UN
Thant warned recently that un-
less something is done quickly the
situation will jeopardize the very
existence of the United Nations.
The 111-nation Assembly wres-
tled with the financial problem for
six weeks last spring in a special
session devoted solely to this ques-
tion. The stopgap measures adopt-
ed then brought little real relief.
Despite these steps, Thant says,
"the organization is likely, for
some time to come, to operate un-
der a serious deficit and a cash
position causing constant con-
cern."
Need Funds
Thant acknowledges the prob-
lem basically results from inability
to collect assessments to finance
the two big United Nations peace-
keeping operations in the Middle
East and the Congo.'
The situation boils down to
three main questions:
-What, if anything, can the
United Nations do about collecting
the overdue assessments from
member countries ?
-What can be done to make
up .the mounting deficit if delin-
quent members persist in their re-
fusal to pay?
-What can be done to finance
future United Nations peace-keep-
ing operations so that adequate

funds would be assured in ad-
vance?
Bad Debts
UN diplomats see little or no
chance of collecting much of the
$100 million now overdue. Pub-
licly, however, they still talk about
collecting it. They have not yet
tackled the alternative of making
up the deficit by other means.
The Assembly has accepted an
advisory opinion of the World
Court holding that these assess-
ments are binding on members,
but the Soviet Union, France and
other countries have challenged
the ruling. They could have their
voting rights suspended under a
UN charter provision, if they are
a full two years in arrears, but
this has never been done.
No Payment
The difficulty of trying to force
payment by penalties, such as sus-
pension of voting rights, is appar-
ent in view of the number of
members in arrears. Despite a few
recent payments by delinquent
countries, 40 have paid nothing on
the Congo operation and 22 have
not contributed to the UN force
in the Middle East.
Some of the big countries like
the Soviet Union and France,
which owe most of the money, have
made it clear they have no inten-
tion of paying even if there is a
move to suspend them. The im-
portance of their refusal is under-
lined by the fact that the Soviet
bloc alone is more than $42 million
in arrears on Congo assessments

WHERE THE MONEY GOES-A Swedish soldier stands guard as
refugees line up for food at a UN-administered camp near Elisa-
bethville, Katanga. This peace-keeping operation accounts for
much of the UN's $100 million deficit.

By Intercollegiate Press
BRUNSWICK, Me. - Bowdoin
College's new senior center pro-
gram, expected to begin in the
1964-65 academic year, is "an
effort to develop an effective pro-
gram for seniors in the best pos-
sible environment," according to
Prof. William B. Whiteside, direc-
tor of the $3.1 million center.
"Bowdoin will modify what has
been a typical four-year program
for a small residential college,
and will provide a common facil-
ity for all senior class members.'
The faculty has approved a num-
ber of curriculum innovations
which we feel will be appropriate
for seniors."
Designed to increase effective-
ness of the entire academic pro-
gram and make college exper-
ience outside the classroom more
relevant to the senior student's
sense of immediacy, the senior
center program will include a
series of senior seminars, seen as
a means of study comparable to
that of the master's or doctoral
level in universities.
The building's facilities will
provide for both visiting lecturers
and career specialists to live and
mingle with students,
"Environmental planning and
effective management of Ameri-
can education calls for gathering
and interpretation of information'
that colleges have not had avail-
able before," Prof. Whiteside
noted.
."We want to learn more about
how students make decisions, and
what will help them proceed more
intelligently and effectively as
they plan their futures."
* * *
SALT LAKE CITY-A Univer-
sity of Utah committee has rec-
ommended that a continuing ad-
SPECIAL
CAMPUS
RATES
Faculty
Magazine Student Educator

visory group on fraternities and
sororities be approved by the
president.
The report recommended that
a closer working relationship be
developed between the university
and fraternities in regard to their
financial operations and that
greater alumni participation in
chapter financial affairs be en-
couraged where needed.
The report was an outgrowth of
an earlier inquiry into legal as-
pects of fraternities and sororities
being housed on university prop-
erty, site location and develop-
ment, types of housing, methods
of financing and establishment of
a (construction) timetable. to de-
termine conditions under which
fraternities and sororities could
move on campus.
The committee's recommenda-
tions were based on the assump-
tion that the "fraternities and
sororities at the university are
an important part of the com-
munity and that they make a sub-'
stantial contribution to students'
educational experiences."
Also it noted that specific kinds
of actions need be taken by the
faculty, administration, students,
parents and alumni if the poten-
tial contribution is to be realized.
BOULDER-The faculty senate
of the University of Colorado

adopted a report from an ad hoc
committee which supported the
students' right to criticize univer-
sity faculty and administration.
The committee studied "the de-
gree to which students may cri-
ticize publicly members of the
university faculty and adminis-
tration without disciplinary action
by the university.'
The committee, which included
five faculty members and two
student government representa-
tives, decided that "the univer-
sity should encourage and stimu-
late independent thinking on the
part of its students in every way
possible.
"It should also encourage dis-
sent, and freedom of opinion and
criticism of all university ideas,
policies and programs and of
society."
The report also reminded stu-
dents of their responsibility in
exercising such freedom. It also
added that "in extreme cases the
university, through appropriate
channels, may be called upon to
pass judgment upon its members
with respect to their observance
of the obligations that they owe
to the university."
Disciplinary action "would be
called for only under the rarest
of circumstances," the report
stated.
_____ ____ ____ ___ 1

1

I

and France is $14 million in ar-
rears.
Some pressure was relieved by
the sale of United Nations bonds
amounting to $145 million to 52
countries, but these sales have
come virtually to a halt. There
will be further relief when Thant

I

Figures for
vailable.

1963 are not

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SINGCUT FORW
SLIM FITS
Everybody's wearing trim, tapered, low-
waisted LEVI'S Slim Fits-because everybody
likes the long, lean, LEVI'S look. Cut from
rugged twill, LEVI'S Slim Fits are equally at
home in the classroom, on the campus,
wherever young men get together.

r.

I

I

carries out his planned withdraw-
al of UN forces from the Congo.
The costs, once as high, as $10
million a month, will be cut sharp-
ly. This, however, will not get rid
of the deficit now on the books.
As for future peace-keeping
operations, the secretary-general
will report to the Assembly on con-
sultations the special session asked
him to make. One of the ques-
tions involved was a proposal to
establish a peace fund to be used
to finance future peace-keeping
operations.
Hoadley Tells
Of Court Case
Against YSA
Collegiate Press Service
BLOOMINGTON - M o n r o e
County prosecutor Thomas Hoad-
ley told a United States National
Student Association seminar last
week that he brought charges
against the Indiana University
chapter of the Young Socialist
Alliance as a "public service."
Indiana's recognition, he said,
constitutes a subsidy of the
YSA and he did not think "that
the people of Indiana want to
subsidize a group advocating the
overthrow of the United States
government."
He said he began action last
December after Indiana recog-
nized the YSA as an official
student organization, an act which
he felt was in violation of the'
university's own policy of deny-
ing official recognition "to any
totalitarian fascist, communistic
or subversive" organization.
Cites Charter
Hoadley said he based his
charges on statements in the YSA
constitution which declared the
organization's purpose "to present
revolutionary socialist ideas on
the campus," and which bases it
on "the traditions of Marxism as
developed by Lenin, Trotsky, Lux-
emburg, and Liebknecht."
The university refused on the
grounds that YSA was not on tne
United States Attorney General's
list, which Hoadley termed "de-
funct" since it hasn't been re-
vised since 1957.
Caught with .Goods
Hoadley said that a number of
YSA pamphlets were found in the
girl's possession.
He also remarked that his of-
fice had released some secret
grand jury testimony showing
that the dean of students at In-
diana had requested that the
students be indicted. Hoadley said
he did this to show up the uni-
versity's "ambivalent" position for
charging violation of academic
freedom while at the same time
urging indictment.

Time
Life
Sports Illus.
Newsweek

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THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
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Phone 662-3061
Days or Evenings

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®TI!049 WMIL!VNIS lBREGISERED IN THE U. G. PATEN; FICB AN6D O8NOTES GARMENTS M4AOE ONLY BY LEVI STRAUSS i CO.. 98 BATTERY ST., SAN PRANCISCO 6

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The undergraduate fraternities of the University of Michigan, through their
Mass Rush Meeting, offer you the opportunity to hear about, and ask about,
Greek life at Michigan. For a comprehensive introduction to Michigan fra-
ternities, and for a chance to speak with representatives from each, you are
invited to attend.
Thursday, September 5, 7:30 P.M.
Michigan Union Ballroom
Speakers:

11

John Feldkamp
Clifford W. Taylor
Lawrence G. Lossing

Advisor to Michigan Fraternities
President, Interfraternity Council
IFC Rush Chairman

MASS RUSH MEETING

wyMVM'a^^ n+MVwuunmr +vxv + ^^PMVw'+ s w W +++^"'+wM+ wro~
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