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September 04, 1963 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESHAV..,",FP*r v.n..,..lainq

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'esolution

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Ideals

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Education

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WANTE D!
FRESHMAN CLIPPINGS
M-=D E N /&zr6er
7271/z N. UNIVERSITY
Basement of Michigan Pharmacy

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Institutions of higher education
onstitute the vanguard of the
development and the advance-
ment of human thought.
Thus, they areperpetually com-
nitted to fostering the highest
ossible standards of intellectual
xcellence and individual creativ-
ty. The students whom they serve
,re therefore under the obligation
o review critically and conscien-
iously the aims and orientation
if higher education.
If higher education is to con-
inue to promote the goals of well-
eing and cooperation among men,
t is imperative that it function
n an atmosphere of integrity and
reedom. Full respect must be paid
o the substance of traditional lib-
ral arts and science courses.
Stimulation Needed
The survival of democracy, how-
ver, depends not only on the stu-
ent's ability to assimilate facts,
ut also on his capacity to form
udgments. Thus the student must
e stimulated to analyze and eval-
ate contemporary principles and
astitutions if that democracy is to
emain healthy and free.
Colleges and universities must
urther attempt to stand critically
part, yet maintain relevance to
ociety. This delicate balance must
e maintained if the university
ommunity is to assume leadership
n that society.
The academic community should
e characterized by creative con-
roversy, respect for the dignity of
11 its members, and a unified de-
otion to the development of a hu-
nane and democratic social order.
lea I) Curricular Considerations
The university exerts a signifi-
ant influence upon its students.
vore importantly, the university
xists to challenge its students.
'hus all reletant concepts and
deas must be offered to the stu-
.ent in an atmosphere in which
e can give them informed consid-
,ration.
Extending this principle, USNSA
uggests distribution requirements

be used to insure contact with a
wide range of relevant fields of
study. Beyond these requirements,
the student should have no course
restrictions except those needed
for continuity within his area of
concentration.
Minimal restriction permits
maximum exercise of the student's
capabilities for free and creative
Sick Bay
Even student leaders are all
too human, as the sick list from
the United States National Stu-
dent Congress indicated last
week.
The Michigan delegation was
hit hard by varying bugs.
A sample of the illnesses in-
cluded Daily Editor Ronald
Wilton's case of mononucleos-
is, Michigan Union President
Raymond Rusnak's severe cold
and Student Government Coun-
cil Administrative Vice-Presi-
dent Thomas Smithson's hay
fever.
Also finding themselves a bit
under the weather were SGC
Executive Vice-President Edwin
Sasaki with a burning fever,
a n d Regina Rosenfeld and
Linda Cole, who gave up and
flew home.
Howard Abrams, one of the
University's most lethal and
vocal delegates, was suppressed
by the loss of his voice to
laryngitis.
inquiry. Supervised individual re-
search and study, when the con-
tents of the course permits, pro-
vides the ideal learning situation.
Also, Libraries
The institution has the respon-
sibility to provide the student with
the maximum amount of source
material possible, whether this be
books in a library or scholars-in-
residence.
While USNSA recognizes the
necessity for some measurement

of academic standards, it is con-'
vinced that all too often present
grading systems lack flexibility
and are rigidly and superficially
applied.
The artificial line between ad-
vanced undergraduates and grad-
uate students should be breached
at every opportunity. There is no
reason why the methodology of
graduate study should not be ap-
plied to undergraduate courses.
Suggestions
The seminar and the thesis are
valuable teaching tools; the for-
mer because it encourages the in-
terplay of differing ideas to an
extent tha, the classroom cannot,
and the latter because it provides
an opportunity for integration of
ideas and construction of theory.
It may also provide a means of
relating the concepts and meth-
ods of several disciplines.
The USNSA, while recognizing
the need for some methodological
instruction, believes that the train-
ing of primary and secondary
teachers should emphasize course
content and a broad liberal arts
background rather than concen-
tration on method.
Artificial Bar
USNSA feels that the barrier
between research and teaching is
artificial. The competent faculty
member can and should use his
research to enrich his teaching.
Thus he not only adds to the
growth of scholarship but also
stimulates the student to contri-
bute to and to critically evaluate
existing knowledge. The ideal of
the university as a community of
scholars demands that the part-
nership of faculty and student in
research be developed to the ut-
most of the student's competence.
AREA II) EDUCTAION AS
A TOTAL EXPERIENCE
Education is the individual's
continuing personaldiscovery of
the ideas of men and the things
of the world. The formal elements
of instruction-classroom and lec-
tures, libraries, papers, and books
-are only a small part of the
process of education.
Colleges and universities must
foster in their students a desire
to seek education in all areas of
existence, and impart to them
those skills and abilities necessary
to the search.
Toward this end, institutions of
higher learning can make vast im-
provements in three areas of stu-
dent life.
1) Students can learn a great
deal from their instructors, and
from each other, outside the class-
room. Schools should try to in-
troduce resident faculties into liv-
ing units where informal contacts
can be made.

Dining halls shouid be utilized joperation of the activities. Theset

not only for meetings among -tu-
dents and faculty, but also for
meetings with outside guests. In
addition, the dining halls (and
other college facilities) can be
used for seminars, informal talks,

activities, because they provide a
concrete opportunity for the stu-
dent to find out and act for him-
self, are a critical element in the
educational process.
3) On the same grounds, schools

grams, encourage social service
organizations and such projects
as teaching assistantships in local
schools.
These are all opportunities for
individual initiative and self-ex-
pression, and as such, are elements
of education.

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