100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 30, 1963 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

___THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sociologist Views Impact
Mass Media on Populations

THE MEREDITH AFTERMATH:
Mississippi Hit by Exodus of Faculty Members

'

3 ANGELES - Although in-

iation contained in mass me-
reaches a, large. number of
le, only .a small portion of
public passes on such infor-
on in private conversation,;
es W. Swinehart, an assistant
Y director of the Survey Re-
ch Center, said recently.
eaking before the AmericanI
ological Association, Swine-
noted that there are several
nunity characteristics which
closely related to communica-
behavior.
r example, income and edu-
n are related to the a'mount
ultiple media usage to a large
it. Better - educated people
to watch fewer television pro-:
is per week, but prie-tine
ing is not related to educe.

In general, people with more
education are oriented m o r e
strongly to print than, to broad-
cast media, Swinehart explained.
Membership in voluntary asso-
ciations, which often serves to re-
inforce or weaken particular mass
communications, is directly . re-
lated to both income and educa-
tion, he added.
Community size also has a
bearing on communications ef-
fects, according to Swinehart, who
says that the larger the 'commun-
ity, the greater will be the pro-
portion of the population exposed
to a message in any given medium.
Other Side
On the other hand, the larger
the community the more likely it
will be that newspaper and mag-
azine',messages will be more ef-
fective than those on radio or TV,

i

I

IA

I

and that no single message in any
medium will elicit the desired re-
sponse, since conflicting messages
a-e more likely to be present.
Swinehart asserted that age is
generally unrelated to multiple
media usage. About 50 per cent
of the population uses four media
up to the age of 60, beyond which
usage 'drops sharply.
The biggest jump in TV news
consumption, however, occurs af-
ter the age of 50, with this group
averaging twice as many news
shows per week as those under 35.
Magazine reading is unrelated to
age.
No Difference
Multiple media usage is roughly'
the same for both sexes, Swine-
hart went on. Men and women
read about the same number of
magazines' or newspapers, watch
about the same amount of eve-
ning and weekend TV, with only
slight differences in 'the kinds of
programs viewed and the evalua-
tion of their content.
Swinehart noted that a careful
study of community character-
istics "may help us to describe
more accurately and fully the
context within which mass com-
munications effects occur -- the
constellation of social and psycho-
logical factors which determine
whether or not a person will read
or see a message, how he will re-
spond to it, and so on."
Elect Porter Head
Of Press. Group
Prof. William E. Porter of the'
Journalism department was elected
president of the Association for
Education in Journalism at the
group's annual convention in Lin-
coln, Neb.,'on Wednesday. Prof.
Porter succeeds Dean, Theodore
Peterson of the College of Jour-
nalism and Communication at the
University of Illinois.

OXFORD - The University of
Mississippi has suffered a 20 per
cent loss of faculty in the wake of
last fall's riots over the enrollment
of James Meredith.
Many who are leaving say they
are doing so because of "recurring
threats of political interference
not conducive to an academic at-
mosphere," according to t h e
Washington Post.
The normal turnover rate is 10
per cent.
High-Ranking Men Go
In addition, many of the men
leaving are in the higher academic
ranks. In previous years, most of
the departees were instructors and
assistant professors.
But this year, 11 full professors
and 17 associate professors will
be teaching at other universities.
One of them, Prof. Samuel F.
Clark, chairman of the chemistry
department, offered this reason to
the Post:
Moral Breakdown
"My decision to leave Ole Miss,
an institution for which I have
felt and still feel a deep affection,
stemmed from the serious loss of
academic freedom to faculty and
students of the university and to
the breakdown of moral and pro-
fessional responsibility on the part
of the university's administrative
officers."
Another, Dean Robert Farley of
the Mississippi law school, left for
the University of Florida law
school.
Dean Farley, 65 years old, would
have had to be re-elected yearly
by Mississippi trustees until he
reached the mandatory retirement
age of 70.
Struggle To Stay
"I probably would be re-elected
to the faculty," he told the New
York Times, "but there'd be a
fight over it."
In the last academic year Dean
Farley was a target of segrega-
tionist organizations who claimed
he taught intergrationist doc-
trines.
"You've got to teach what the

law is," he philosophized. "You've
got at least to give the students
all the various views. Certainly
you can't have a law school that
tries to cover up the law you don't
like."
Some Are Bitter
Mississippi provost C h a r I e s
Noyes said that of the 37 pro-
fessors who have resigned "seven
or eight have indicated their un-
happiness with, or a bitterness
with, the university or the state or
the South."
"Some are leaving with bitter-
ness; some are leaving with re-
gret," Noyes told the Times. He
also cited low salaries as another
factor for the departures.
He said Mississippi was seeking
the best possible replacements to
insure that "there will be no
short-changing of our students
next year."
Call for Help
In some cases, he said, this
means a "holding action;" several
faculty members will be called out
of retirement to teach for a year
until capable replacements can be
recruited.
Noyes believes that some de-
partments will be strengthened
once new professors arrive.
One of the new faculty mem-
bers, Prof. Robert Scott, moved to
Mississippi from the University of
Alabama to become chairman of
the chemistry department, replac-
ing Prof. Clark.
Prof. Scott feels that the Missis-
sippi crisis has made state citizens,
aware that the school must make
progress. "If there's political in-
terference here, it's being brought
before the people of Mississippi,
and I don't think the people will
stand for it," he said.

i

t'

r~o °I

-Associated Press
MEREDITH GOES TO CLASS-United States marshals escort James Meredith to his first class at the
University of Mississippi. The repercussions from this violent and forced enrollment clobbered Ole
Miss with a 20 per cent exodus of faculty.
MORE FISH:
Report Cites PlnTo Fertilize Lake

THE NEW

l

CROWN HOUSE OF GIFTS
welcomes you to Ann Arbor

with a chance to WIN

"CROWN PRINCE GUSTAV"

i

BAHA'! WORLD FAITH
Student Group Presents
OPEN HOUSE

AMHERST, Mass. (R)-An Ohio
State University researcher re-
cently reported possibilities for
increasing the fish population of
nutrient-poor lakes by adding
fertilizer, just as a farm is fer-
tilized to increase production.
This scientific variation of
"casting bread upon the waters"
was described by Prof. Derry K.
Koob of the University Institute
for Polar Studies in a report to
the annual meeting of the Ameri-
can Institute of Biological Sciences
at the University of Massachu-
setts.
He reported that the addition
of superphosphate fertilizer to cer-
tain virgin, nutrient-poor lakes
located in alpine lakes regions of
this country quickly increased the

Friday, Aug. 30
500 E. William

7:00 P.M.
Apt. 3

Refreshments and Discussion

JAMES MEREDITH
.. later--happier

1~ .11

quantities of algae and small
plankton animals-a diet on which
fish can thrive and multiply-by
up to a hundred-fold.
More Food Possible
While the experiments described
were conducted in isolated lakes
primarily \used for their recrea-
tional potential, the implication
of the report was that lake-fer-
tilization might promote an addi-
tional food resource for people
living in mountainous regions of
the world.
Prof. Koob indicated that the
reason some lakes in alpine re-
gions are poor in nutrients is be-
cause they are largely surrounded
by rocky formations, in contrast
to richer soils at lower altitudes.
Describing experiments in which
several pairs of lakes were used,
with fertilizer added to one lake
of each pair, and the other lake
acting as a "control," he said:
Once Is Enough
"There is. no question that a
single application of superphos-
phate fertilizer to such virgin nu-
Dominic Dascola
Litt. '36
Invites You To
OM Barbers
(Near Kresge's)
or
The Dascola Barbers
(Near the Mich. Theatre)

trient-poor, alpine lakes can in-
crease significantly the primary
production (total amount of al-
gae) and productivity (rate of
production of algae) in these lakes.
"The nutrients from a single
application of fertilizer may be
trapped in the lake basin for pro-
longed periods-at least seven
years-supporting large popula-
tions of algae and small plankton
animals,". .
A hundred-fold increase in the
quantity of two types of algae re-
sulted within a month's time.
Area College
Set To Open
PITTSBURGH VP)- The Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh is planning
a series of two-year regional col-
leges in Western Pennsylvania.
They will emphasize freshman and
sophomore work leading to higher
education.
The first such regional college is
expected to open this month at
Greenburgh, Pa., with the com-
munity providing equipment and
facilities. Initial enrollment will
probably run from' 150-175 stu-
dents, and there will be 10 faculty
members.
The plan is envisioned as a par-
tial solution to the problems of
bulging student enrollment and
rising college costs. With region-
al campuses located around the
state, the university can educate
a larger number of students with-
out expanding its main Oakland
campus in Pittsburgh.

i

Since 1883

Since 1883

It's WAHR'S University Bookstore-
for the BEST IN BOOKS & SUPPLIES
-serving Michigan students since 1883
New and Used
tEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES

;

I

Susie

"Crown Prince Gustav"

Sally

Closest guess, will win this
world's largest stuffed
animal--on display in
our store .window.

1

only
for
those

I

Guess combined weight of "Gustav" and two girls:
-----------------mm mmm----------------------
* U
NAME
I LOCAL ADDRESS
M I
a SCHOOL IN UNIV YEAR.
My guess of the total combined weight of;
"Gustav" and the two girls on Saturday, Sept.
7, 1963 is lbs. and ozs.
This coupon may be deposited in our store
any time prior to Sept. 7th.

for all University Courses

seeking
1
the"
Unusual

0

r

I

Contemporaryin
pendants
jade
garnet
ebony

#1

folk art.
wall hangings
carvings

Handmade

paintings

I 1 Hnmd anig

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan