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January 15, 1963 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. JANU,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTJV~DAV.. JANTI

yvair Ax. iklp V[ r\\lAJ

Minnesota Squeaks By Michigan, 66-63'

Bearcats Still No. 1
In Basketball Poll
By The Associated Press

By DAVE ANDREWS
Associate Sports Editor
Minnesota sprung a stinger in
the person of sophomore guard
Terry Kunze on Michigan here last
nigght, but it was senior forward
Eric Magdanz who scored the big
bucket as Minnesota handed Mich-
igan its second straight Big Ten,
loss, 66-63.
Some 6,600 fans saw Kunze put
on a fantastic shooting exhibi-
tion from the floor .and Magdanz
come up with the key buckets.'

Big at 6'3" for a guard, Kunze
showed it was no handicap. His
14 field goals in 15 tries tied the
Big Ten record for single game
percentage by Ohio State's great
Jerry Lucas last year.
Big Play
Magdanz came up with a three-
point play with 31 seconds left
in the game to break a 59-59 tie
and put the game out of reach.
Between the two of them, they
pumped in 48 of Minnesota's 66

points, Kunze leading the way
with 28.
For the Wolverines, who got no
closer than a tie at any point
after tie halftime buzzer, sopho-
more Bill Buntin led the scorers
with 21 points. The big center,
however, was cold from the floor,
clicking on only seven of 22 at-
tempts and in general kept pretty
well in check by Minnesota's
brawny forward wall.
In fact, the whole Michigan

NCA4 Alters Substitution Rule

By The Associated Press
College football coaches praised
the newly adopted almost free
substitution rule as "good for the
game" today and indicated they
now have enough room to mani-
pulate their forces despite a
couple of annoying strings.
"Very wise-very sound," said
Bump Elliott, of the University of
Michigan, commenting on the
change made by the rules com-
mittee of the National Collegiate
Athletic Association Saturday
night at Coronado, Calif.
Completely
Completely free substitution will
be permitted by either team any
time the clock stops and on all
plays in a series except the fourth
down and when the ball changes
hands.'
In each of the restrictive cases,
a coach may send in two men.
Substitution has not been that
free since unlimited substitution
went out 10 years ago.
"We feel this liberal change will
speed up the game,' said Ivan
Williamson, Wisconsin Athletic
director and head of the commit-
tee. "The provision will eliminate
the messenger system, do away
with the recording of substitutes
and permit the use of specialists."
Reliefs
Pitt's John Michelesen said, "It
will alleviate the problem of al-
Scores
South Carolina 80, Furman 77
Illinois 78, Northwestern 76
No. Mich. 79, Minnesota:Duluth 78
Western Michigan 110, Detroit 67
Notre Dame 80, Butler 54
Missouri 62, Kansas 56
Iowa 65, Wisconsin 56
Wake Forest 82, Virginia 62

ways trying to keep track of the
subs on the sidelines. Now the
coach has more time to concen-
trate on the game."
John Griffith, of Georgia, com-
mented, "I'm for free substitution
and I think this is about as close
as we can get."
That's not the way it looked to
Ara Parseghian, of Northwestern.
Disappointed
"I'm' greatly disappointed," he
said. "As I interpret the rules, you
can't platoon on first or fourth
down. Who wants to platoon on
second and third down? Why don't
they go all out and give us un-
limited substitution?"
Duke's Bill Murray, member of
the rules committee, explained,
"There are basic philosophies of
football. A majority of the coaches
favored a return to unlimited sub-
stitution, but there were some who
favored the idea that the boys
should learn both offense and de-
fense.
"The rules committee is obli-
gated to reflect these philisophies.
So the change is a compromise.
Unlimited substitution will occur,
but coaches still have to train
players for both offense and de-
fense."
Big Break
Kansas' Jack Mitchell called the
rule "a great break for the boys
with somewhat limited abilities,
allowing them to play more; it's
not so good for the outstanding
boys-they won't have a chance to
use all of their abilities because
it's seldom they will play both
ways.",
VMI's John McKenna had this
reason for favoring free substitu-
tiond:
"The old rule was supposed to

equalize the have and have-nots,
and at first we liked it because
we were short-handed. But eacn
year they liberalized the rules a
bit and pretty soon we ended up
playing our two platoons against
everybody's three."
And Virginia Coach Bill Elias
said, "It may be good for football,
but it won't make much difference
in the long run. The strong will
stay strong, the weak will stay
weak."
In other rules changes adopted,
the number of timeouts was reduc-
ed from five to four in a half
and the T-formation quarterback
was made an eligible pass receiver.
WCH.A

team was held pretty much in
check. The Wolverines wound up
with 26 of 64 from the field for
a shooting percentage of 40 6.
Minnesota shot 50 per cent ori 27
of 54. Michigan gained a 39-37
edge in rebounds with Buntin
leading both sides with 12.
The Gophers, whose Big Ten
record now stands at 2-1 and are
one game below .500 at 6-7 over-
all, fielded a front line of 6'8" Me!
Northway, 6'7" Tom McGrann and
the 6'6" Magdanz, however, and
pretty well dominated their de-
fensive boards in what Minnesota
Coach John Kundla called "our
best defensive game."
Rare
Only on rare occasions were
the Wolverines able to get more
than one shot and most of these
were from "outside" as the Go-
phers collapsed around Buntin and
the basket.
Nevertheless, the game was close
all the way with the lead chang-
ing hands several times early n
the first half.
Three straight buckets by Kunze
in the final minute and a half of
the first half gave Minnesota a
slim 31-29 intermission advantage.
Big Two
Largely on the five for five per-
formance of Kunze and Magdanz s
consistent scoring, the Gophers
maintained their lead throughout
most of the second half until
baskets by junior Doug Herner and
senior- John Oosterbaan knotted
the score at 57 with 3:04 left in
the game.
McGrann put Minnesota in front
again 59-57, but again Ooster-
baan tied the score with a long
pumper, before Magdanze put the
game on ice.
Michigan's Ccach Dave Strack,

naturally disappointed with the
loss, had nothing but praise for
the Minnesota team.
"We knew they had a good ball
club, but N e didn't look for them
to be so quick.
"Our kids tried hard out there,
but we just couldn't put together
a combination that would click."
Michigan's next action comes
January 30 at Detroit. The next
Big Ten game is at Michigan
State, February 3.
Again

For the seventh straight week,
ever since the season's start, Cin-
cinnati's basketball team finished
on top in The Associated Press
poll Monday. And for the third
straight week, the steam-rolling
Bearcats swept the boards, gath-
ering up all 45 first place votes
for a perfect 450 points.
If it weren't for the unbeaten
Bearcats, who now have won 31
straight, 13 this season, No. 1
team honors undoubtedly would
have gone to Loyola of Chicago
which owns an unblemished rec-
ord through 15 games this season.'
As it was, the high-scoring
Ramblers had to be content with
second place on 383 points. One of
Loyola's two victories last week
was a 107-69 triumph over West-
ern Michigan, marking the eighth
time the Ramblers had gone over
the 100 mark.

The top ten, based on total
points alloting 10 for a first place
team, nine for second, eight for
third and down to one for tenth
place vote with first place votes in
parentheses:

Cole
Harris
Buntin
Cantrell
Herner
Pomey
Oosterbaan
Tregoning
Totals

MICHIGAN
G F
2-8 0-0
2-4 0-0
7-22 7-10
3-7 1-1
5-9 1-2
3-6 1-1
4-611-1
0-2 0-0
26-65 11-151

T Reb.
4 5
4 1
21 12
7 1
11 1
7 4
97
0 3
63 35
T Reb.
20 7
5 10
2 6
9 4
28 3
2 2
00
66 32

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Cincinnati (45)
Chicago Loyola
Illinois
Arizona State
Doke
Ohio State
Georgia Tech
Wichita
West Virginia
Stanford

W L Pts.
13 0 450
15 0 383
1111 325
14 1 311
12 2 154
10 2 144
11 1 141
11 3 107
10 3 78
10 3 56

Magdanz
McGrann
Northway
Bateman
Kunze
Jensen
Linehan
Totals

MINNESOTA
G F
6-11 8-8
2-9 1-3
1-7 0-0
3-10 3-4
14-15 0-0
1-1 0-2
0-1 0-0
27-54 12-171

MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA

29 34-63
31 35-66

Big Ten Standings

Denver
North. Dakota
Tech
Colorado
Minnesota
MSU
Michigan

WL
6 2
4 1
4 3
2 2
2 3
3 5
1 6

T
0
1
1
0
1
0
I

Pet.
.750
.750
.563
.500,
.417
.375
.188

Illinois
Indiana
Ohio State
Minnesota
Michigan St.
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Northwestern
Purdue

w
4
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
3

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.500
.500
.333
.250
.000
.000

AGAINST OHIO STATE:
Lack of Rebounding Hurts 'M'

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BONNIE DOBSON
"a fresh and striking entry
in the folk singing field"
VARIETY
"ingratiating honesty
and warmth"
N.Y. TIMES

1

U U

By BILL BULLARD
With Bill Buntin on the bench
for nine of the 20 minutes of the
second half in last Saturday's
68-66 loss to Ohio State, Michi-'
gan's rebounding was weakened
enough to be a major factor in the
defeat.
The Wolverines picked off 32
rebounds as against 21 for the
Buckeyes in the first half. But
with Buntin out for much of the
second half Michigan was out-
rebounded 24-15 in that period.
Not only did the Wolverines
have to play without their No. 1
rebounder but the second leading
rebounder, John Harris, only
played a couple of minutes, being
hampered by a leg injury. Coach
Dave Strack agreed after the game
that a healthy Harris would have
made a difference in the rebound-
ing department. "Harris is a great'
ball player," he said. "Anytime
he's not in the game it hurts us."
Strike One
Strack first took Buntin out of
the game at 10:37 of the second
half after Bill had incurred his
third foul. John Harris took over
at center despite his leg injury and
had a turn at battling Gary
Bradds under the boards. At this
time Michigan had a 52-48 lead.
Buntin came bac.r into the game
about two minutes later. But at
7:24 he fouled Brads in a scramble
for a rebound. This was his fourth
foul and Tom Cole came off the
bench after a brief rest to become
the Wolverine center. Bradds
sunk his free throw to cut Michi-
gan's lead to 54-53. Tom Bowman
put OSU in front to stay with a
lay-up shortly after.
Try Again
At 6:09 with the Buckeyes lead-
ing 56-54, Buntin was substituted
back into the game. He fouled out
of the game for the firs~t time
this season at 5:56 trying to stop
Bradds from scoring. The 6'8"
Buckeye center's backet was good
and he was awarded a free throw
on Buntin's foul, which he missed.

Ohio State led at this point
58-54. Michigan never gave up and
almost pulled the Victory out sev-
eral times. But lack of a big man
to fight Bradds for rebounds once
Buntin was out of the game
proved too much of a handicap
for the Wolverines.
Close
Buntin ended up with 13 re-
bounds to 15 for Bradds. Both
Michigan and Ohio State had
sophomore forwards picking off
the second highest number of re-
bounds for their team. Larry Tre-
gonning played most of the game
for the Wolverines after starting
for Harris and pulled down 12 re-
bounds. Tom Bowman came off
the bench for the Buckeyes to end
up with 10 rebounds, all but one
of them gathered in during the
second half.
Bradds had a clear edge over
Buntin in scoring, 33-15, but only
took down two more rebounds de-
spite playing the whole game com-
pared with about 75 per cent of
the game for Buntin. After the
game, Buntin commented on the
rebounding battle between him-
self and Bradds. "I didn't find him
difficult," said Buntin. "He just
Pooped ... but must carry on' Snap
right back and keep going'Take Verve
continuous action alertness capsules.
Effective, safe, not habit-forming.

had one of his good nights in scor-
ing while I had a bad one."
Expressing the common feeling
of the Michigan team that the
Wolverines can beat the Buck-
eyes in their February 16 encoun-
ter at Yost Field House, Buntin
said, "I'm looking forward to it
and I know they're not." Added
John Harris, "We'll kill 'em next
time."
ONE DAY IN THE LIFE
OF IVAN DENISOVITCH
The Soviet novel about which every-
one is talking. Now appearing in
English in the MOSCOW NEWS. The
translation into English was made
in the USSR. All issues with the
novel sent to you for only $1.00.
Send order and payment to: Im-
ported Publications & Prod. 1 Union
Square Dept. New York 3, N.Y.

ME, EE, AE ENGINEERS

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OUSNSA is anon-profit organzatonservingtheAmeraean student comznt " i'

.. R

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the pause that
bI'
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refreshes!

Wt'.
Ever wonder .why you've never been to Paradise?

take a break from studying
escape from your blue books into
the romantic, magical; musical world of
see

It isn't because no roads lead there. Accord-
ing to the promises held out to engineering
students, almost everywhere there's an
opening there is an ecstatic little Eden, or one
close by.
We'll indulge in no such nonsense here.
Connecticut is real ... a fine place to live, to
work, to play. We shall ask no more from you

a diversification program that includes design
and development of propulsion controls, life
support systems, other environmental con-
trol systems, automatic stabilization systems,
electron beam machines, propellers, and
ground support equipment.
A Hamilton Standard college personnel
representative will be on campus soon. He'll
la ral na 4 n a niri r rra . nn. a ,at. 4. ,,a, And o lra

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