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December 08, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

9A TTLTRhAVl, J5VP~VIDEWib 0,190

SL l I HI A ATTas T?1 A p .0

L 1 UIiL1PEY . I ULIVIISE n 61 1ubz

z

Butler

Takes

Last-Second

Victory Over 'M',

70-69

Goal-Tending Beats Cagers;
Cole Hits for 21 in Defeat

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Babcock Leads

Icers Past Queens, 12-1

By LLOYD GRAFF

+----_ I

One needed not look at the
scoreboard at Yost Field House to
find that Michigan had lost its
first game of the year, 70-69, last
night, for he would have known
it merely by hearing the anguished
gasps blending discordantly with
the final buzzer.
The gasps were in response to a
15-foot jump shot from the right
side by Gerry Williams, diminu-
tive Butler guard.
The shot never reached the
basket because Michigan center
Bill Buntin leaped above the hoop
to bat the ball down on its descent
and was thus called for goal-tend-
ing. This meant that the shot
counted as a field goal.
Butler Takes Lead
Buntin's violation was the cli..
max of a hectic second half which
found the Wolverines holding
leads up to nine points until the
Bulldogs jumped in front, 68-66,
on a layup and freethrow'by Wil-
liams after he had stolen the ball
from Bob Cantrell in the lyichigan
backcourt.
Coach Dave Strack had instruct-
ed his team to go into a semi-
stall offense with 3:50 remaining
in the game. Buntin moved out al-
most to the midcourt line to un-
clog the middle in the hopes of
getting an easy bucket,.
Their chance came at 2:57. Doug
Herner broke under the basket in
the clear, took a pass and laid the
Cian't Stall

ball up. As it tottered on the rim,
Tom Cole gave it an extra guiding
nudge. The referees judged the tip
to be illegal and invalidated the
basket, leaving the score at 66-65.
"That easy shot we missed un-
der the basket did it," said Strack
in the dressing room.
Buntin Narrows Gap
After Williams' three-point play,
Buntin was fouled by opposing
center Jeff Blue. He sank his one
free throw, putting the Wolver-
ines within a point with 28 sec-
onds to go.
Michigan put on' a full-court
press with Cantrell on Williams.
The Butler backcourt ace was!
judged to have committed a charg-
ing foul which gave the ball to
Michigan out of bounds.
After a time out Cantrell tossed
the ball to Doug Herner, who
drove into the tangled center and
drew a one-and-one foul. As si-
lence enveloped Yost Field House
the canny guard sunk both charity
tosses, making the score 69-68,
setting the scene for Williams' last
second shot.
Bowman Bombs Basket
The game started as an even
tussle, neither team gaining more
than a four-point lead. The re-
markable shooting of 6'4" forward
Tom Bowman kept the Bulldogs in
the game.
The blond bomber potted 16
markers in the first half, most of
them coming on looping jump
shots from over 20 feet from the
basket.
Tony Hinkle, Butler's venerable
coach, remarked after the game
that he did revamp his offense to
set up Bowman. "We tried to keep
a regular continuity in our offense.
We set no special person up."
Michigan had a balanced attack
in that half using a patterned of-
fense looking for the easy lay-up.
Tom Cole, rebounding from two
below-par performance, tallied 11
points in the first half and 21 for
the, game to lead Michigan. Bow-
man finished with 24.
Cole Back to Normal
Strack was pleased with Cole's
return to form. "He looked a lot
better tonight," said Strack after-
wards. The Michigan coach was, of
course, dejected after the loss. "It's
a tough one to lose, especially that
way," added Strack downheartedly.
Hinkle added, "This was the
best Michigan club we've seen in
a while, They'll win a lot of games
in the Big Ten." He had special
praise for Buntin but warned not
to expect too much from him be-
cause he is only a sophomore.
So, on a cold and slushy day in
December a couple of streaks end-
ed abruptly. Michigan had its
short - lived two - game winning
skein snapped, and Butler's stead-
ily improving Bulldogs ended their
losing stretch at three.
It was all done, simply and with'
startling finality, by the shrill
sound of a referee's whistle.

}"

}

U- 72(12 71 r7.r'TrVtr

Cole
Harris
Buntin
Cantrell
Berner
Pomey
Oosterbaan
Tregoning
Totals
Sanders
Bowman
Blue
Williams
Krebs
Shook
Pope
Totals
MICHIGAN
BUTLER

MICHIGAN
G F R
9-15 3-4 10
2-10 0-1 11
4-12 6-7 17,
4-13 .-3 1
3-7 5-5 3
1-1. 00 1
0-3 0-1 2
4-10 0-0 7
27-7115-2156
BUTLER
G F R
1-2 1-1 3
9-14 6-6 8
4-12 2-4 '9
'8-22 1-1 5
2-7 0-1 2
3-4' 1-1 1
2-5 1-2 8
29-66 12-16 36

P T
2 27
34
3 14
2 9
2 11
o00
0 0
3 0
15 69

P
2
22
31
21
4
2
2
177

T
3
24
10
17
4
7
5
70

TOM COLE
... back on track
'BAD FAITH':
Federation
Raps AAU
CHICAGO ()-The U.S. Track
and Field Federation, accusing the
Amateur Athletic Union of bad
faith, formally renewed its war
with the AAU group yesterday over
control of amateur track.
T h e Federation's governing
council met Thursday and yester-
day and announced it "is proceed-
ing full speed with its broad, pro-
gressive track and field program
for all age groups."
Charles (Chick) Warner, Fed-
eration executive director, regret-
ted that an expected agreement
failed because of the "AAU's re-
pudiation of the Olympic House
documents, which were developed
in good faith.".
The AAU, at its Detroit conven-
tion last weekend, endorsed a co-
alition plan, but Federation offi-
cials immediately charged it was
not the same as the one agreed
upon in New York.
"The AAU had displayed such
bad faith there's no chance for
the coalition to be revived," said
Warner. "Sooner or later there
has to be a point of no return and
this seems to be it."

By B1D 013ZW IC
A free-wheeling Michigan sex-
tet rammed home an even dozen
goals last night to defeat Queens
(Kingston, Ont.), 12-1.
Captain Larry Babcock led the
attack with a hat trick and also
assisted on two other goals. His
five points put him one up on
Gordon Wilkie and Ross Morrison,
each of whom accounted for four
points.
The high production proved
Coach Al Renfrew a smart line-
juggler. After getting only four
goals in last wekend's action
against Michigan State, Renfrew
put some of his players on dif-
ferent lines and came up with the
top team score of the young sea-
son.
First Line Stars
The Wilkie-Ron Coristine-Gary
Butler lines notched four goals,
and the Cole-Babcock-Pendlebury
combination accounted for five.
The remaining three came from
various makeshift lines and pen-
alty killers.
Renfrew fully expects a much
closer battle tonight when the
same two teams meet again at 8
p.m. here since Queens did not
arrive until almost 6 p.m. last
night. They had a long ride and
were held up three hours on the
bus by the snow.
Queens Coach Moon Flanigan
saidusimply, "We were just beaten.
Michigan looked real good. But
the long passes really got us, es-
pecially after being down 5-0 after
the first period."
Different Rules
In Canada there is no passing
across the center red line allowed,
and this difference led to several
Michigan breakaways and fast
rushes before Queens defense was
ready.
The first three Wolverine goals
came on shots between goalie Doug
Norkum's pads. Tom Pendlebury
scored from Babcock at 1:54 of
the opening period. Morrison then
netted one at 2:39 with assists
from Jack Cole and Babcock.
Goalie Bob Gray had yet to stop
a shot from the Queens shooters
at this time.
At 6.17 Butler took a perfect
pass from Morrison and Coristine,
who skated around the defense
and put the puck right in front
of the net. Butler slipped it in.
Gray Tested
Gray was then called upon to
make two quick saves as Frank
Jodoin slammed a pair of shots
at the goal crease in one of
Queens' few threats of the period.
A combination of sloppy passing
by the Blue team and some great
goal-mouth defense by the Golden
Gaels prevented the fast-skating
Wolverines from further scoring
until 17:30, when Wilkie poked in
a six footer. With two seconds re-
maining Babcock scored his first
goal on a slap shot.

Target Practice, .Anyone?

MICHIGAN
Gray
Rodgers
Kartusch
Wilkie
Coristine
Butler

G
D
D
C
F
F

QUEENS
Norkum
Mitchell
Chin
Redmond
Dinsmore
Windover

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
HAT TRICK FOR BABCOCK-Michigan Captain Larry Babcock
scores his third goal of the night, putting the puck (arrow) past
sprawling Queens' goalie'Doug Norkum. Babcock had taken a shot
from the blue line, skated in alone and poked in the rebound.

First Period Scoring: M-Pendle-
bury (Babcock) 1:54; M--Morrison
(Cole, Babcock) 2:39; M - Butler
(Coristine, Morrison) 6:17; M-Wil-
kie (Coristine, Rodgers) 17:30; M -
Babcock (Pendlebury, Morrison)
19:58.
Penalties: M--Newton (elbowing)
8:55; Q-Windover (tripping) 9:33.
Second Period Scoring: M-Wilkie
(Butler) 10:26; M-Babcock (Morri-
son, Pendlebury) 14:42; M--Forrest
(Kartusch, Rodgers) 17:36;- Q -
Brown (Jordin, Lerton) 7:11.
Penalties: M--Gallpeau (kneeing)
4:34; M-Butler (highsticking) 6:41;
M--Galipeau (tripping) 11:01; M-
Morrison (roughing) 18:16; Q -
Plan now for your
:BERMUDA
College week
1963
bigger, busier,
better than ever!
" Informal welcoming dance to start
the fun.
" College Day at the Beach . .. the
biggest beach party of the year.
" All-day cruise to historic St.
George. Luncheon. Calypso music.
Gombey Dancers.
" Round Robin Tennis Tournament.
" College Talent Revue.
" Fun Festival with jazz concerts,
choral groups, dance contests.
" Barbecue Luncheon.

In the first period Norkum made
nine saves and Gray only four.
The second period was quite a
bit rougher and several penalties
were handed out. But while both
teams were short-handed, a block-
ed shot bounced out to the point
position and Queens defenseman
Ray Brown slapped the puck past
Gray into the upper right-hand
corner of the net at 7:11.
tThree minutes later on a power
play, Butler carried into the Gaels'

Mitchell (intreference) 6:41; Q-J.
Quinn (offensive checking) 9:04; Q-
Weston (roughing) 18:16.
Third Period Scoring: M--Babcock
(unassisted) 4:24; M--Butler (unas-
sisted) 8:14; M--Forrest (Wilkie,
Morrison) 13:28; M-Butts (McGoni-
gal, Wilkie) 19:50.
Penalties: M-Forrest (tripping)
10:46; M-Butts (tripping) 11:27; Q-
Jodoin (tripping) 3:11.
MICHIGAN 5 3 4-12
QUEENS 0 1 0-i1
Saves:
Gray (M) 4 4 5-13
Norkur: (Q) 9 9 12-30
SHE'LL. WANT
YOU IN ..'
3 K,
TODD'S
\Long,.lean
and Slim..
"CASINOS"
Tailored originally for Todd's
Sby hsi.s and they're long,
lean and slim ... right dawn
to your shoe-tops. Take note
of the 4-inch 'vent at the
c,,ffless bottom. Slashed front
pockets, flip-flop back
pockets. Sanforized cotton in
black, oliye and white.

zone, around behind the net, and
flicked a pass out to Wilkie cross-
ing in front of the net. Bang, and
it was 6-1.
During the next stoppage of
play as the refree was calling a
penalty, Gray went over the the
bench and removed his mask.
Renfrew explained after the
game, however, that the mask
had become loose and bothersome,
so Gray took it off. It will be

fixed up
though.

for tonight's game,

I

Gray Stops Break
But there were a couple of an-
xious moments when Gray had
to come way out of the net to
prevent a breakaway. He stopped
it nicely, but a defenseman's
clearing pass put it right out near
the blue line for another shot.
The goalie went down on his back
with his big pads between the
shooter and the net, but he was
about 30 feet away from his post.
When the puck was lofted over

Gary's pads toward the net, two
blue-clad defenders batted it down
and fell on it for a face-off.
Babcock . tipped in Morrison's
whistling shot from the point and
Forrest tallied to close the second
period scoring.
Babcock got the hat trick when
he dribbled the puck to the goalie,
who made the stop as he sprawled
to the ice but did not smother it,
and the center shot it home.
Michigan's last three markers
came as the Wolverines roved
around the ice and shot at will.

38 31-69
37 33-70

SCORES
NBA
Detroit 123, San Francisco 116
Boston 126, Los Angeles 112
Syracuse 149, Chicago 129
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Tulsa 73, Purdue 65
Creighton 52, St. Johns (NY) 34
St. Peters (NJ) 65, Manhattan 52
Seton Hall 75, Loyola (Bait) 57
New York U. 85, Georgetown 65
Colorado 82, UCLA 60
COLLEGE HOCKEY (WCHA)
North Dakota 11, Michigan State 4

-
0

Sightseeing.
Special Tennis Trophies.
ALL YOURS AT NO CHARG
he BERMUDA
Trade Development Board
620 Fifth Ave, New York 20, N.Y.

Triumph Over Tradition
Open 'til 8:30 every Monday

L'

i

ANNOUNCING THE 1963-1964
AFFLERBACH FELLOWSHIPS*

'WWWWWW

~TYY~IIIXXXXXIZI1ZXXXXXXX~IZXXXXXhI IIX1Ii~ ~XX71IIILIk~i~'

ACKGROUND OF THE COMPETITION: No matter how much time our People in
Naming spend thinking up just the rig'it color names for our shirts (Maize, Stone Green,
Peat Blue, etc.), the Eagle Secret Shoppers inevitably rerort that you choose your Eagle shirts
with such statements as "Gimme six of them greenish ones" or "Could I bother you for two
or three dozen of 'those stri-ped ones." Our problem is in selecting names which will capture
the imagination of the shirt-buying public. 4 NATURE OF THE COMPETITION:
The 10 Afflerbachs for 1963-64 will go to those personssuggesting the best names for our
colors. Imagination-capturing names, like Well Red, Long Green, Charlie Brown, or Navel
Orange. You may wish to inspect our shirts - for inspiration, if not purchase. Eagle shirts don't
always have an Eagle label-some fine stores sew in their own-b-t if you write us, we'll
suggest your nearest Eagle Shirt Color Inspection Station. + STIPEND: The grand prize
winner will have his (or her) choice of a Traveling Afflerbach (a grand all-expense-paid weekend
at the Bush House in Quakertown-an exciting chance to become acquaintedwith the natives
- many of whom are us, including Miss Revera Aflerbach, herself) or a Stationary Afllerbach
(a dozen Eagle Button-down shirts). The 9 other Affierbachs will consist of a grant of four
Eagle Button-down shirts. Each, that is. + RULES: The competition is open to all students
and faculty members at schools, as well as to those who have filled in the coupon below.
*This, actually, is Eagle's second competition in as many years. Those of you who partook of the first, that is, what to do
with the pocket on a Shirtkerchief, will doubtless be excited to learn that the book containing many of your letters to Miss
Afflerbach has now been published by the Macmillan Co. and is now available at your bookseller. We have called it Dear
Miss Afflerbach, or The Postman Hardly Ever Rings 11,342 Times, and the price is $4.95.

f

AFFLERBACH FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION FORM

1

Only Schick makes two different

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2_ AAA,.jee

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