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September 11, 1962 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. SI

EP7

I _1I

i

II

11

wid0
at the University
Presented by,
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
1962-63
CHORAL UNION SERIES

11

I

111

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .
PAUL PARAY, Conductor
"LA TRAVIATA" (Verdi) . . . . . .
GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER
FRENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA . .
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
UDAY SHANKAR HINDU DANCE CO.

(2:30) Sunday, October

7

'Marching',
Symphonic
Bands at'U'
Stepping through their paces at
220 steps per minute each fall,
the Michigan Marching Band
takes the spotlight at all Michigan
home football games.
The band, over 150 members
strong, is under the able direction
of Prof. William D. Revelli. It has
established a reputation for un-
usually fine playing, precision
marching, and intricate dance
steps, formations, and gridiron
productions.
The practice required to make
them so perfect has band members
march enough steps to equal a
distance of a little more than once
around the world. Over seven
hours a week are spent drilling for
each show, and members of the
band lose collectively over 800
pounds during the eight weeks
they perform.
Compensations
All this work has its compensa-
tions, though. Not only does the
ban dhave an opportunity to show
its stuff before receptive Saturday
afternoon crowds, but each year it
also goes to one or two Michigan
away games, last year spending a
weekend in Minnesota.
When the football season draws
to a close, the University Sympho-
ny Band steps into the spotlight.
The Symphony Band requires
an extremely high degree of pro-
ficiency, since members read and
perform the finest of symphonic
literature.
Revelli Conducts
Prof. Revelli, in his capacity of
director of University bands, is
the able leader of this band also.
He has served the University in
this capacity since 1935.
The spring tour is the climax of
the Symphony Band's season.
Band members receive a real ex-
posure to being "on the road," as
the band plays in places such as
Carnegie Hall, Philadelphia Acad-
emy of Music, and Symphony Hall
in Boston.
A third part of the University's
band lineup is the Varsity Band.
Its activities center around extra-
curricular campus functions such
as basketball games and local
parades.
Varsity Band
Primarily for students without
the proficiency to qualify for the
Symphony Bandor for those who
cannot devote the time required
for participation in the other
bands, the Varsity Band is direct-
ed by Prof. George R. Cavender.
The purpose of University
bands, according to Prof. Revelli,
is to encourage student talent and
serve as a valuable training
ground for future music educators.
Actual practice in organization,
training, and presentation provide
participants with experience in
music education, culture, and art-
istry.

TRIAL BY JURY-The Gilbert and Sullivan Society's production of this short classic kept the
heroine protected from the gentle mercies of her esrtwhile suiter, while itself drawing rave notices in
the next day's Daily. The play is an acid comment on British jury trials (and British jurors) of the
day.
Students Put On G&S Operetta

I
I

Friday, October 19

1

. . .

. Wednesday, October 24

. Tuesday, November

6

LENINGRAD PHILHARMONIC.

Monday, November 12

. . . 0 0

"MARRIAGE OF FIGARO" (Mozart) . .
NEW YORK CITY OPERA COMPANY
GERARD SOUZAY, Baritone. . .
PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
WILLIAM STEINBERG, COndoctor
TOKYO CLASSICAL BALLET, "Komaki" .
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .
WALTER SUSKIND, Conductor; ANNIE FISCHER, Pianist

Saturday, November 17

Tuesday, January 8

. .

. Thursday, February 14

The Gilbert and Sullivan Soci-
ety, which was started on campus
in 1946, will continue, its policy, of
presenting two of the pair's operas
this year.
Gilbert and Sullivan's light-
hearted plots and patter-song
scores provide rich material for
production. Full of improbable
characters and even*moreimprob-
able story lines, student actors get
a chance to sing, dance, and play
up the comic elements in the
scores, besides gaining acting ex-
perience.
Each year the Society spends a
full semester preparing each of
the two productions, chosen from
among the duo's more popular cre-
ations.
Last fall, "HMS Pinafore" was
presented, and "The Gondoliers"
was put on in the spring. These
two were on the 11-show schedule
the Society follows-a schedule
they have already completed three
times.
Besides its shows on the cam-
pus, the group also holds one to
four trips during the year into
other nearby cities.
Host Sites
Detroit is always sure as one
host site, while Flint, Wyandotte,
and Toledo have also welcomed
the G&S Society's productions in
recent years.
Any University student can join
the society. At the beginning of
each semester, a mass meeting is
called. Those interested can then

sign up at the meeting-which is
advertised throughout the campus
and in The Daily-for jobs they
would like to do. Stage crew work,
makeup, props, scenery, lights, or-
chestra, and other varied tasks
supplement the acting and singing
roles for which auditions are held.
The total membership in the
society* last Srear was around 120.
Fifty to sixty of these actually
appeared in the plays, as princi-
pals, or in the choruses.
Off-Stage Jobs
The other off-stage jobs kept
everyone busy.
The Society usually just about

breaks even in its budgeting. Time
invested by Society members is
another matter. Although the out-
lay is large, show veterans assure
everyone that the return is well
worth it.
Performances for the Society
have been held in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, in the League,
Generally, two performances of
each show are given here in Ann
Arbor, Playbills- at times they
have been reproductions of the
original D' Oyly posters-plus ad-
vance publicity, reviews, and gen-
eral fanfare make these two-night
runs highly successful.

I

Carillon Concerts Entertain
'U' Students Each Thursday

l

(2:30) Sunday, March

3

. . Tuesday, March 12

Season Tickets:

$20.00-$17.00-$15.00-$12.00-$10.00

Single Tickets (on sale Sept. 20)-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.25-$1.50

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
Carillon concerts will be¢given
weekly this fall on Thursday
nights from 7:15 to eight p.m.
These concerts, which can be
heard all over campus, originate
from Burton Memorial Tower,
where there is one of the largest
carillons in existence. Prof. Per-
cival Price, University carilloneur,
said that the carillon is excellent-
ly placed in its bell chamber for
"letting the music out."
The University is responsible for
many firsts in the use of the bell

EXTRA SERIES

"THE SOUND OF MUSIC" . .
RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN POPULAR MUSICAL
NATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA

. (8:00) Wednesday, October 31

Ii r -Il

. . . .Friday, November

9

"RIGOLETTO" (Verdi) . . . . . .. (2:30) Sunday, November 18
NEw YORK CITY OPERA COMPANY
NDR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF HAMBURG Wed., January 16,
HANS SCHMIDT-SSERSTADT, Cnductor
BIRGIT NILSSON, Soprano . . . . . . . . . . Monday, March18

There's a Nationally-Known
Independent Record Dealer
in Ann Arbor

Season Tickets:

$10.00-$8.50-$7.50-$6.00-$5.00

Single Tickets (on sale Sept. 20)-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.25-$1.50
"MESSIAH" CONCERTS
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION and UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
AND SOLOISTS; LESTER McCOY, Conductor
8:30, Saturday, December 1
2:30, Sunday, December 2
SPECIAL RECITAL

tower carillon, he said.
New Works Played
Original compositions and new
works, many by Prof. Price, are
performed for the first time on the
carillon.
Furthermore, there are over 2,-
000 arrangements specifically writ-
ten for it.
The facilities can be used in
combination with other instru-
ments. A concert this past sum-
mer combined 20 brass and per-
cussion instruments with the caril-
lon. Bagpipes and chorus can also
be used.
Other Possibilities
Other types of bell-ringing are
possible, Prof. Price said. Russian
trezbon ringing, using a team of
10 ringers, two men at the caril-
lon keyboard, and a conductor,
was one such performance offered
this past summer.This event could
only have occurred at the Univer-
sity, Prof. Price said.
Burton Memorial Tower was
built in 1936; it houses the Charles
Baird Carillon of 53 tuned bells
plus classrooms, studios, and the,
music school library.
PUBLISHED
FOUR TINES A YEAR
9
tt
Y

I

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E

:,'j

Years of m
atmosphere

usically

intelligent service

of congenial

informality,
ion amongr

in an
have
record

resulted in an envied posit

ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist. . .

Thursday, February

7

. ."

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

.

CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor

2:30, Sunday, December

9

dealers.
A COMPREHENSIVE RECORD STOCK-
TABLE MODEL & CONSOLE RADIO-PHONOGRAPHS
RECORD RACKS AND OTHER ACCESSORIES
r
TV SETS by RCA VICTOR
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MUSIC
May we invite you to visit us at our convenient location:

1'

. 0 0

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL (5 concerts). . Feb. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET-complete Beethoven cycle

JULIAN BREAM, Guitarist and Lutist

. . 2:30, Sunday, March 31

ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL

THE PH~LAflFI PHIA fORCHFSTRA Aiv.011

___Mnv9.10.11.12

I /. _ ! I

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