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November 21, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-21

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WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 21,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'b A Fllp aTtlnuuS+ ,

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1962 TUE MICHIGAN BAIIN

PAGE THiREEt

i i'

Christian

Democrats

Act

Innovations Bolster Education

To End Cabinet Coalition

CUBAN BOMBERS:
Stevenson Negotiates
Withi Soviet Officials,
UNITED NATIONS (W)-United States Ambassador to the Unit-
ed Nations Adlai E. Stevenson expressed belief after a meeting with
top Soviet negotiators yesterday that the Soviet Union will ultimately
withdraw some 30 Jet bombers from Cuba.
The luncheon negotiating session was held following receipt here
of Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro's declaration that he would
voice no objection if the Soviet Union decides to remove the bomb-
ers. "Ultimately the bombers will

Notes Cost
O Turnover
OfMOSCOW (A')-The chairman of
the Soviet State Labor Committee
told Communist Party leaders yes-
terday labor turnover "remains
big in industry" and is costing 2
billion rubles-more than $2 bil-
lion-a year.
The labor committee chief, Alex-
ander Volkov, reported to the cen-
tral committee on the labor turn-
over cost. Premier N i k i t a S.
Khrushchev said Monday it was
big enough to justify some restric-
tive legislation.
Labor Turnover
The labor turnover was one of
a number of problems facing the
central committee in the second
day of its current session. The
meeting was called to speed up So-
viet industrial and agricultural
production.
A parade of speakers expressed
full endorsement of the plan out-
lined by Khrushchev Monday for
a sweeping reorganization of the
Communist Party and the whole
regime of industrial and agricul-
tural management.
Need Incentives
Labor Chairman Volkov touched
on one of the sore spots in Soviet
industry when he stressed a need
to provide material incentives to
workers.
Analysis of Premier Khrush-
chev's opening speech, which filled
seven 4nd a half pages in Soviet
newspapers yesterday, indicated
little except hard work and more
sacrifice in store for the average
workman.
Khrushchev said the next year
would bring more consumer goods,
but the rate of increase in the
spending for the good things of
life is slowing down. So is the
spending even for heavy industry,
although Premier Khrushchev told
the Central Committee it was go-
ing to get the lion's share of Soviet
expansion money.
He said the plan for 1963 called
for an increase in heavy industry
production of 8.5 per cent. That!
was a cut from 8.8 per cent in the
plan for this year.

be withdrawn," Stevenson told a
reporter.
Quick Action
The Cuban prime minister's
statement in a communication to
acting United Nations Secretary-
General.U Thant raised hopes here
for quick Soviet action and a con-
sequent easing of the tension over
Cuba.
Thant held a working luncheon
session with Soviet and United
States diplomats who have been
conferring here on ways for re-
solving the four-weeks-old Cuban
crisis.
C a s t r o' s communication to
Thant was seen here as one re-
sult of the prolonged visit in Ha-
vana of Soviet Deputy Premier
Anastas I. Mikoyan.
The United States has regarded
Mikoyan's task as attempting to
persuade Castro to go along with
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev's pledge to President John F.
Kennedy to withdraw all offensive
weapons and permit UN verifica-
tion of their removal.
Advisers Meet
Also yesterday President Ken-
nedy met with his top Cuban ad-
visers.. Lincoln White, State De-
partment spokesman, said that
while Castro's move was "a hope-
ful sign" he agreed with Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk "it's too
early to tell just what it means."
White said the United States is
holding Russia, not Cuba, account-
able on the bombers.
Rusk said the continued pres-
ence of the bombers in Cuba has
been a main obstacle in the Unit-
ed States-Soviet negotiations on a
settlement. President Kennedy has
insisted that the 750-mile range
planes are "offensive weapons"
which must be removed under his
deal with Soviet Premier Khrush-
chev.
Lift Blockade
It was expected in Washington
that the Russians, in return for
removing the bombers, would at
least seek removal of the naval
blockade aimed at preventing ad-
ditional offensive weapons from
entering Cuba. Kennedy has of-
fered to lift the "naval quaran-
tine. "
So far no international inspec-
tion arrangement is in sight. Cas-
tro, in his letter, renewed his op-
position to inspection on Cuban
soil.

CHANCELLOR ADENAUER
... coalition dissolved
RUSSIA:
Report Aid
Agreement
With Cuba
H A V A N A (P) - Responsible
sources said yesterday Soviet Dep-
puty Premier Anastas I. Mikoyan
has signed a new three-year eco-
nomic aid treaty with Cuba.
There were no details. The re-
port came after disclosure that
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro had agreed to removal of 30
bombers delivered to Cuba by the
Soviet Union. The demand for re-
moval of the bombers was made by
the United States.
The Soviet Union has been the
chief economic prop of Castro's
government.
Informants said the economic
agreement was signed by the visit-
ing Soviet official and Ernesto
Guevara, industries minister.
Mikoyan has been here discuss-
ing the Cuban crisis with Castro
and other Cuban leaders.
Indications were that there
might be some connection with the
economic pact and the bomber de-
cision.

Chancellor
To Designate
New Aides
Adenauer Pressured
To Remove Strauss
BONN (P)-The German govern-
ment crisis surged to a new high
last night.
The Christian Democrats de-
clared the coalition dissolved and
empowered Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer to form a new cabinet.
The chancellor's position was
not immediately threatened, how-
ever. Constitutionally, he can only
lose his job if Parliament proposes
a new chancellor and elects him
with a majority. Parliament does
not meet until Dec. 5.
Offer Resignations
All 15 Christian Democratic cab-
inet members offered to resign at
once to give Adenauer a free hand
in forming a new cabinet, a party
statement said.
The Christian Democrats made
the decision at an emergency ses-
sion prompted by the resignation
of the five Free Democratic Party
cabinet members Monday.
The Free Democrats took this
step to pressure Adenauer into re-
moving Defense Minister Franz Jo-
seph Strauss.
Newspaper Affair
They hold him responsible for
the arrest of staff members of
Der Spiegel, a news magazine cri-
tical of his policies. However, the
Free Democrats emphasized they
wanted to keep the coalition in-
tact.
The Christian Democrats accus-
ed the smaller party of conduct-
ing propaganda in an effort to en-
hance their chances in next Sun-
day's Bavarian provincial election,
where Strauss is strong politically.
The Free Democrats, whom Ade-
nauer needed to stay in power
after his party lost its majority
last fall, were blamed by the
Christian Democrats for the pres-
ent government crisis.

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Writer
WASHINGTON-Higher educa-
tion is bursting at the seams all
over the country, and nowhere
more than in the public colleges
and universities.
From the smallest private col-
leges to the great, sprawling state
universities, the current academic
year has been marked by change
and innovation.
The nation's first Tibetan cen-
ter, at the University of Washing-
ton . . . the world's most powerful
electron accelerator, a joint ven-
ture of Harvard University and
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology . . . a $3 million art
gallery at the University of Wis-
consin .. .a new college of dent-
istry at the University of Ken-
tucky . . . a new department of
aerospace engineering at Texas
A&M . . . and, everywhere you
look, more of everything: more
students, more professors, more
buildings, more courses, more class
hours per day, more Saturday
classes, more year-'round pr3-
grams ...
Tide of Change
The tide of change and innova-
tion is running strong, and every
college in the land has been
caught up in the current.
The one, main, overriding rep
son is the force ci numbers.
According to a New York Times
survey, 58.6 per cent of all the 1962
high school graduates had planned
to enter college this fall, including
a fantastic 70.7 per cent of the
young men and 47.4 per cent of
the young women
Total Enrollment
When all the figures are in,
total college enrollment for 1962-
63 is expected to reach 4,729,000.
This includes 450,000 in two-year
junior colleges and 790,000 taking
college courses without credit to-
ward a degree.
This is another in a long string
of record enrollments but, as en-
tertainer Al Jolson used to say,
"Folks, you ain't seen nothin'
yet!"
The first crop from the postwar
baby boom won't start pounding
on college doors until 1964. And
by that time, as many as 70 per
cent of all high school graduates
may well be demanding a higher
education.
In the face of such pressure no

college, public or private, can re-
main static; all will have to
change to meet the changing
times.
Generally speaking, there are
two approaches to the problem:
1) Restrict enrollment and be-
come increasingly selective, and 2)
Expand as fast as funds and facil-
ities will allow.
By their very nature, it is the
public colleges and universities
which are committed to expansion.
Large private institutions can be-
come more selective (and this is
not necessarily bad), but city and
state-supported schools have an
obligation to make higher educa-
tion available to all who can profit
by it.
A recent survey by the joint of-
fice of the Association of State
Universities and Land Grant Col-
leges and the State Universities
Association indicates the extent
of this expansion.
The University of Wisconsin,
for instance, has 15 new buildings
under construction at a cost of
$28 million-$1,000 for each of its;
28,000 students.
Plan African
Economic Unit
LUSAKA, Northern Rhodesia (P)
-Negotiations are under way for
a large economic association of
states in Eastern, Central and
Southern Africa-taking in such
countries as the entire Congo, the
Rhodesias, Kenya and Tanganyika.
This was confirmed, yesterday
by Mbyue Coinange, permanent
secretary of the Pan Africanist
Freedom Movement for East, Cen-
tral and Southern Africa.
Coinange said the new associa-
tion of African states would be a
"sort of African Common Market."
Member countries would have
reciprocal trade and tariff agree-
ments and share common services
such as roads and railways. There
would also be an arrangement for
an exchange of technical knowl-
edge.
"A political chapter is coming
to an end in Africa and a new eco-
nomic chapter where leaders of
all races must join to build up
countries rather than political agi-
tation has come," Coinange said.

The University of Alaska is
spending $8.5 million on construc-
tion, an outlay of about $5,000 ,per
student.
Required Fees
It should be noted that Wiscon-
sin residents pay only $220 per
year in tuition and required fees
at the state university, Alaska
residents pay only $115 at the
University of Alaska.
The University of Connecticut,
Ohio State University and Miami
University of Oxford are building
new branch campuses to serve
other geographical areas of their
states.
Wayne State University has
just completed a $3.5 million med-
ical research center, the University
of Florida is finishing a $2.4 inil-
lion nuclear research center and
the University of Hawaii is com-
pleting six major buildings this
fall for its east-west center.
Leisurely Pace
The leisurely pace that mom and
dad knew when they went to col-
lege is as out of date as the racoon
coat and the Model T Ford. On
many campuses, classes start as
early as 7:30 a.m. and extend into
the evening hours, even on Satur-
days.
The University of Florida and
Flordia State University this year
have swung over to the trimester
system, which permits full-scale,

year-round operation. With the
trimester ssytem, a student may
complete the traditional four-year
undergraduate course in three
years and eight months if he
wishes to attend continuously.
WSU and North Carolina Agri-
cultural and Technical College
have adopted the quarter system
to accomplish the same end and
will have a continuous academic
year of four consecutive quarters.
Summer Season
The University of Iowa has ex-
panded its summer season so that,
by 1963, students may complete
the four-year course in three.
In other attempts to handle the
flood of education-hungry students
on their campuses, many schools
are turning to mass teaching tech-
niques.
Ohio University at Athens and
the University of Washington put
new -television stations on the air
this fall, and the University of
Idaho has applied for a TV license.
TV Teaching
A dozen other colleges and uni-
versities are expanding their use
of television teaching. The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for instance, will
pipe local courthouse proceedings
into its law school lectures.
One of the strongest trends
noted nationwide is increased en-
couragement to the superior stu-
dent.

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COMPLETE
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Turkey, Duckling, or .Baked Ham
with all the trimmings . .$2
Also Steak, .Chops, and Sea Food
WE SERVE YOUR FAVORITE
COCKTAILS, BEER, & WINES
Serving the Public since 1903
PREKE TES
SUGAIR ..IBOr WIL

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109-111 S. Main

Phone NO 2-1414

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C OME

7c)

c HJi ~

COMING

COMING

COMING

December 5, 6, 7, 8
The U-M PLAYERS-Dept. of Speech-present
The OPERA DEPT.-School of Music-in
BIZET'S
CARM-E _N

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

7 H E

* b3 A r

World News Roundup

All Seats $1.00

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

By The Associated Press
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan-Unit-
ed States Ambassador Walter P.
MCConaughy flew to the Pakistan
capital yesterday from Karachi for
talks with President Ayub Khan.
The Pakistan Parliament has been
called into a closed-door emergen-
cy session today to discuss the
India-China border fighting.
WASHINGTON - The United
States Chamber of Commerce has
urged upon President John F. Ken-
nedy a less bulky federal budget
accounting for all cash taken in
and spent. The committee recom-
mended that "a comprehensive
cash budget should be the princi-
pal vehicle for the President to
present his annual financial plans
to the Congress and the public."
WASHINGTON -- Two weeks
after the national elections the
candidates for two governorships
and one United States Senate seat
are still undetermined. The tight-
est count yesterday was in Rhode
Island where Republican John H.
Chaffee held a lead of only 67
votes over Democratic Gov. John
A. Notte Jr. after a recount of all
the state's voting machines.
* * *
OXFORD, Miss.-Attorneys for
former Maj. Gen. Edwin A, Walker
opened their attack yesterday on
a court-ordered mental test in the
federal government's suit charging
him with seditious conspiracy and
inciting insurrection. The attor-
neys argued that the mental ex-
amination should "not be permit-
ted to pollute the records of this
court."
* * '.

is due to increase in the next fis-
scal year has brought speculation
that the Pentagon budget request
may climb over the $50 billion
mark. This is by far the biggest
military spending budget in any
peacetime year.
* * *
HAVANA - Cuban antiaircraft
batteries fired yesterday on a low-
flying twin-engine plane over the
Havana suburb of Miramar. The
plane, presumed to be a United
States Navy Neptune patrol plane,
returned the fire briefly. There
were no reports that anyone
aboard the plane or on the ground
was hit. It was the first known
incident in which Cuban antiair-
craft guns opened fire on in-
truding airplanes.

MAIL ORDERS NOW
To: University PlayersAb
/ Frieze Bldg., Ann Arborj
/
I Enclosed find $ for (number tickets for *
each date checked below. /
I Wed., Dec. 5 Fri., Dec. 7 _
Thurs., Dec. 6 SOLD OUT Sat., Dec. 8 _
I a
: Please check one:;
Q I enclose a self-addressd, stamped envelope.
/ Mail tickets to me.
Q I enclose NO envelope. I will pick up tickets at
/ Mendelssohn box office (open 12:30-5:00, Mon.- & |
Tue., Dec. 3 & 4; 12:30-8:00 performance dates.) I
* NAMF /
/ A S
:ADDRESS PHONE___
vmm mmm mmi-m m..mm.m.i --- .-------------------- m!

306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11 :00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Doily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:CJ. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
9:30 and 11a.m. "How Your Minister Can
Help You." Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
10:20-10:40 a.m. Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.;

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus, Ministers.
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship,
"The Promise of His Coming," sermon by
Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM) 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
7:00 p.m.-Contemporary Worship, Popular
Music and Jazz.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-Student Cabinet Luncheon, Pine
Room.
WEDN ES DAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel follow-
ed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
4-5 p.m.--Coffee Hour, Wesley Lounge.
5:15 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6-8 p.m.-Grad Supper. Discussion on "The
Role of the Laity."
THURSDAY
7:30 p.m.--Kappa Phi, Green Room.
FRIDAY
12:00 Noon - Wesley Foundation Board of
Directors Luncheon, Pine Room.
6-8 p.m.--Young Marrieds' Dinner.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
THANKSGIVING DAY SERVICE at 9:45 a.m.
Sermon by the Vicar: "Thanksgiving: Our
Joyful Obligation."
Sunday: Service at 9:45 a.m. Service by the
Pastor.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Organization,
fellowship supper and program at 6 p.m.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST

.M

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:NDERLOIN

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W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin,EMinister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Roy and Nancy McNair, House Directors
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Adult Discussion, Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.Meeting for Worship.

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CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenow at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 Guild House at 802 Monroe
9:30 Study Seminar at Guild House
10:45 Worship

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