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November 18, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1R. ]962

PAEWOTH-MC IGNAIY TN AV7_ VIUUu'1314~

1:7 V1fAV11.i IN" L1r1"]C JM 10, 1004
III . = 1 11

14"

BACKSTAGE:
MUSKET Points Toward Opening Night

Panel Discusses Change
To Economy of Peace

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
The Union Ballroom is presently
housing an exciting, chaotic and
fascinating operation, the rehears-
als for the 1962 MUSKET produc-
tion, "Bartholomew Fair."
A disreputable-looking crew of
girls clad in tights and leotards
and boys in sloppy shirts and
jeans, as well as a few convention-
al poking participants, are going
through the rigors of shaping up
the show, which will be presented
Nov. 28 through Dec. 1, by Jack
O'Brien, Grad, and Robert James.
O'Brien wrote both book and
lyrics, adapted from Ben Jonson's
final comic masterpiece, written
in 1614.
James Supervises
James, who wrote the score, sat
on .stage during the rehearsal, su-
pervising the group of singers who

traying a group of aristocrats, led
by Bartholomew, who spend a day
at the fair, a carnival-like cloth
market outside of London. These
visitors are much too superficial
and patronizing to see the evils of
the fair-especially Justice Over-
do, who wants to clean it up but
meanwhile is himself pick-pocket-
ed.
On the other hand, there are
the merchants, or rather the
thieves, of the fair, pick-pockets
and prostitutes all. Quarreling and
petty, they are so rooted in their
mercenary pursuits that they have
lost the light and carefree essence
of the fair.
Everyone becomes a target for
everyone else. Unsuspecting Bar-
tholomew, meanwhile, carries on a
blind love affair with the fair.
Spirit High
The exuberance of the musical
was apparent even in rehearsal.
Members of the 50-man cast ran,
danced, leaped and performed var-
ious other gyrations across the
ballroom floor, occasionally collid-
ing when someone miscalculated
his moves.
Several scenes were rehearsed
in which the entire cast took part,
a rather formidable group which
sang loud enough to shake the
sedate curtains in the ballroom.
The rehearsal concluded with
O'Brien issuing an ultimatum that
the entire cast must be present
for a rigorous schedule of work-
outs the rest of the week. Harry
Taxin, '64E, MUSKET general
chairman, commented that the
cast was so enthusiastic and pro-
fessional that it didn't even need
the usual pep-talks to keep up the
morale.
"I've never seen a show in such
great shape less than two weeks
before opening night," he said.
"This production should be one
of the top campus attractions of
the year."
Before becoming chairman of
this year's MUSKET, Taxin held
various positions in other student
presentations, including S o p h
Show and Gilbert and Sullivan.
Plant Guards
Rap Sanford
Several members of the United
Plant Guard Workers of America
Union are demonstrating for an
indefinite period near University
buildings against Sanford Secur-
ity Agency.
Harold Pisarek, international
representative of the union, sai1
U.P.G.W.A. had received com-
plaints from some Sanford em-
ployees that wages were sub-
standard. Also, Sanford had failed
to fulfill a promise to work out
an agreement with the union, he
charged.
The University had its own
plant guard until 1958, when it
was disbanded. The guards work-
ing for the University at that
time were offered jobs with San-
ford with wages at a dollar an
hour less, Pisarek said.

By MARTHA MacNEAL
Five University officials joined
a local and a national spokesman
to discuss "The Technical Prob-
lems of Transition to a Peace
Economy" yesterday, following a
lecture on "Accidental War or
Programmed Prosperity" by Ar-
thur Waskow of the Peace Re-
search Institute in Washington.
The lecture and the panel dis-
cussion were sponsored by the
Center for Research on Conflict
Resolution. Participating in the
panel were William J. Bott, of
the Ann Arbor Chamber of Com-
merce; Daniel C. Jones, president
of the Institute for Arms Control
and Peace Research; Gilbert Burs-
ley (R-Ann Arbor), assistant di-
rector of the Development Coun-
cil.
Also participating were Prof.
James Morgan of the economics
department and program director
of the Survey Research Center:
Norman S. Radin, of the Mental
Health Research Institute; Nor-
mon Thoburn, of the Institute of
Science and Technology, and Prof.'
Kenneth E. Boulding of the eco-
nomics department, co-director of
the Conflict Resolution center, who
served as moderator.
Bursley stressed the experience
of World War II, during which

MUSKET REHEARSES-An exuberant MUSKET cast prepares
in the Union Ballroom for the opening of "Bartholomew Fair," to
appear Nov. 28 through Dec. 1. The musical is based on Ben
Johnson's comic masterpiece.

PROGRAM NOTES,:
Scientists To Consider Radioactivity

the army had planned for eco-
nomic reconversion and disposal
of surplus facilities and services
in transition to peacetime activity
before the war ended. Such plan-
ning, he said, was executed
smoothly.
He visualized state planning of
a similar nature, probably through
the legislative committee on eco-
nomic development. Surplus funds
from defense projects could be
diverted into research.
Thoburn did not feel that the
arms race is likely to be limited
soon. However, he said, the United'
States economy is not strained as
much by the arms race as is the
Soviet economy; consequently we
could expand peace research, par-
ticularly through financing uni-
versities to develop detailed rec-
ommendations.
Several Areas
Radin suggested several areas of
research which could utilize funds
diverted from the arms race,
among them the fields of, degen-
erative diseases, including the de-
velopment of sophisticated drugs
for mental and genetic problems,
and of water conservation. For the
University particularly, he sug-
gested a branch of the National
Institutes of Health and a tech-
nology school.
Morgan cited the difficulty faced
by a democratic society-"we don't
like to push people around." He
say two paramount problems, the
development of mobility and flex-
ibility in labor, and the need to
make increased foreign aid cred-
ible to most Americans.
Likewise, because congressmen
are dependent upon their con-
stituents, Morgan stressed that the
general populace must be con-
vinced that the Soviets can be
trusted before Congress can legis-
late disarmament action.
Tax Cuts
Bott declared that "the consum-
ers might like to have some money
back" in the form of tax cuts
when defense spending is de-
creased. The research facilities of
Ann Arbor, he said, would make
the transition to a peacetime econ-
omy particularly easy here.
Jones pointed out that the latest
United States-Soviet plans for dis-
armament call for complete dis-
armament in nine years and three
years respectively, and likewise
differ on inspection. He suggested
that research programs could be
utilized in solving these problems.
The general tone of the panel
was that conversion to a peace-
time economy would be beneficial
in the event of disarmament.

DIAL 8 6416

Continuous Show
Today from 1 P.M.

The First 3 -Act Motion Picture Ever Presented!
JOSEPH E,
LEVINE AAW ea t
Pmd4,,ed by7 0
CARLO
PONTI 7

COMMUNION BREAKFAST
Sunday, Nov. 18 after 9:30 mass
SPEAKER: MR. JOHN COGLEY
"Emerging Expectations in a Catholic World"
NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

VITTOIO DelSICA FEDERIICO FELLINI LUCNINO VISCONTI
directs the Academy Award Winner directs directs
SOPHIAEaREN ANITAEKBRG ROMY SCMN ID R
An Embassy-international Pictures telease in EASTMAN COLOR

JACK O'BRIEN
... musical comic
came forth in lusty voice with
some -particularly amusing and
melodic songs.
O'Brien not only directed the
rehearsal but also did some chor-
eography, sang and danced him-
self and in general conducted the
show at a rapid pace.
One of the 16 leads, Thomas
Jennings, '63, who plays Barthol-
omew Cokes, Esq., stole the show
at the rehearsal with his portray-
al of the Peter Pan character, gul-
lible and lovable, immensely ener-
getic.
Jennings Perfect
Jennings was kept closely in
mind when the original ;musical
was written.
Another character who stood out
at the rehearsal yesterday morn-
ing was Justice Adam" Overdo, as
Biblical and'as extravagant as his
name suggests.
A pompous, "rather overbearing
individual with the subtle touch
of a bull elephant, Justice Overdo
is played by Carl Schurr. It is his
sworn duty to clean up the fair.
In the first act, he introduces
himself to the audience as a man
with exceptional abilities, who can
get down to the level of the peo-
ple and "beat some sense into their
stupid, idiotic heads."
"Bartholomew Fair" is basical-
ly a series of musical sketches, por-

The fallout of radioactive debrisv
from nuclear explosions and its
part in man's food cycle is the sub-
ject of this week's program in The
Nuclear Age series at 8 a.m. today
on television station WXYZ.
'Edward Epstein, meteorologist,
John Nehemias, director of envir-
onmental study of the radioactiv-
ity levels in south-eastern Mich-
igan, sand Prof. Geoffrey Norman
of the botany department, chair-
man of the National Academy of
Sciences Committee on the Effects
of Radiation, will speak.
Piano Recital .. .
Fred Coulter, guest pianist from
Paris, will present a program to
include selections by Schoenberg,
Boulez,- Elliott, Carter and Schu-
bert at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
Aud. A.
Painting...
Prof. Guy Palazzola, using a live
model, will paint in the expres-
sionist manner, and then discuss
with Prof. Victor Miesel of the

I

history of art department the role
that emotion plays in the work
of expressionist artists. This fifth
program of the series "The Paint-
er's Art" will appear at noon to-
day on WWJ TV.
Composers' Forum.,..
A concert of new music follow-
ed by open discussion will be pre-
sented in a Composers' Forum by
the music school at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Aud. A.
The program will consist of se-
lections by David S. Bates, Enid
Dubbe, and Laurie Efrin, all stu-
dents at the University.
Freedom.. .
The nature and significance of
the conflict between individual
freedom and the American citi-
zen's urgent search for security in
modern society will be the discus-
sion of the final program in the
"Freedom in a Threatened So-
ciety" series.
The program will be seen at.

8:30 a.m. today on television sta-
tion WXYZ.
Poetry Reading-.. .
Robert Bly, "Sixties Press" edi-
tor, will be sponsored by the Eng-
lish department in a poetry read-
ing at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday in
Aud. A. -
Exhibition .. .
In commemoration of the an-
niversary of the birth of Gerhart
Hauptmann, the University libra-
ries are displaying a special ex-
hibition featuring the works of
this modern German writer.
The exhibit is made up of first
editions of Hauptmann's major
works with some biblophile print-
ings and illustrative material.
Degree Recital ...
Morris Hochberg, violinist, ac-
companied by Sylvia Hochberg,
will present a recital of Beethoven
sonatas at 8:30 p.m. today in
.Aud. A.

A NEW JOY HAS COME TO
THE SCREEN...AND
THE WORLD IS A HAPPIER
PLACE TO LIVE IN!
GLASON
*Pronounced GEE-GO
N EXT

I

Dial
5-6290

SHOWS
at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
"Gleason has a
gift of mimicry
that verges on
genius"
--Time Mag.
IN O11 M .fII

HELD OVER

"HATARI"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
The Daily Bulletin is an official 8:30 p.m.-school of Music Degree Re- and Reaction Kinetics of Complex Inor-
publication of the University of cital-Morrisk Hochberg, violinist: Aud. ganic Moiecules"-Dr. Thomas M. Dunn,
Michigan for which The Michigan A, Angell Hall. Visiting Scientist from University Col-
Dailys assumes no editorial responsi- lege, London University, "Ligand Field
bility. Notices should be sent in "Rigoletto" (verdi) will be presented Theory" and "The Spectra of Inorganic
TYPEWRITTEN fornh to Room 3564 this evening in Hill Aud. by the Univ. Complexes": Room 3005, Chemistry Bldg.
Administration Building before 2 Musical Society, in the third program 4:00 p.rn.-Henry Brooks Baker Me-
p.m. two days preceding publication, of the Extra Series. The New York City morial Lecture-Dr. John B. Barnwell,
_________Opera Co. under the direction of Juilius recently retired Director of Tuberculosis
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 Rudel will perform this opera in Ital- Services and Assistant Medical Director
________ian, with Igor Gorin as "Rigoletto." for Research and Education, U.S. Vet-
Others in the cast include Frank For- erans Administration, "The Magnetism
Da CalendarJ retta a~s; the Duke; Nadja Witkowska of Excellence": School of Public Health
sGid;Maia Kova as Madalena. Aud.
2:30 p.m.-Univ. Musical Society Opera The Hill Aud. box office will be open 40 ~.Dprmn fEgneig
-New York City Opera Company in at 1:00 o'clock this afternoon-at which 4.00nic ps.-eparn of EhiA-nunYinh
"Rigoletto": Hill Aud. time standing room tickets may be Professor of Engineering Mechanics,
'7:00 and 9:00 p.m.--Cinema Guild - purchased.' ____ "The Velocity of Fluid Masses in Porous
Disney ogra "lcearn ondrland" Media"': Room 311, West Engrg. Bldg.
andDse y itaecatosd.chtc General [Votiees 4:00 ,.m.--nstitute of Science and
Technology Lecture Series on "High En-
____________________________ Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Scholar- ergy and Theoretical Physics" - Prof.
ship is open to application by any male Marc Ross, Indiana University, "The6ry
fls~ studnt who is a graduate of a high of Resonances": Room 2038, Randall1
N chool in St. Louis, Mo., or St. Louis Laboratory.
County, 1Vlo. and who has sucesafully 4:15/ p.m.-School of Music Recital -
completedgone:ul earofcollgwrk Fred Coulter, guest pianist: Aud. A, An-
____________________________at the Scholarship Office, 2011 SAB. 8:0pm-colo ui tdn
Applications must be completed by Dec. Composers Forum-Aud. As Anel Hall.
Christian S c I e n c e Organization, 1. ie
Thanksgiving Service, Nov. 19, 4:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.-Offc of ReligiousC Afairs
528D SAB. E rvents M o d y Singers, accompanied by Instrumental
Congregational Dlisciples E & R Stu- £73 ~E~JfJ Ensembles: Rackham Lecture Hall.
dent Guild, Open House, Special Re- 3:00 p.m.-lnstitute of Science and
freshments, Nov. 18, 8:30 p.m., 802 Technology and Dept. of Chemistry Composers Forum: Compositions by
Monroe. Seminar Series on "Crystal Field Aspects student composers Rodger Vaughan, Da-
* . * of the Spectra, Magnetism, Structure, (Continued on Page 8)
Super, 6 pm. Thanksgiving Ceera- p, '
tion for Tau Chapter's 25th Anniver-
sr6:45 p.m., Nov. 18, 1511 Washtenaw. Reserve Your
Graduate Outing Club, Hike, Nov. 18,N
trance. * *aka-Bd. Hu* *u.EnuTH qSiViNG u D N ER
Italian Club, Film: "Il Cristo Proibi-
to," Nov. 20, 8 p.m., UGL, Multi-purpose a h
Le Cercle Francais, Baratin, Nov. 18,t\ IC~H I GAN UN ION
3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. ~
.m .,. .r3050 n ..r:.-.- .."
Ulr Ski Club, Organizational Meet- ........r.. r-- '
ng, Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m., Union.
Uitaian fStudenhThGrupMigng, Anelfrom. is toaenitfomUiesiyCl
Nov. 1,:um s toUnitaritoarrn hurch. Serving 1 2:30 o pa F
Discussion: "Afterlife."- Mi n d ThNGry n Mp e
Wesleyan Guild, Seminar, Nov. 18,nn3
10:15 a.m., Pine Room; Worship & Pro-yoo
grpera Co., unde., esheyLdine;ti onofJ lu e ce tyrtrd -et ro T b ruoi
Open House, Nov. 19, 8-11 p.m., Jean
gram, ov.t18 IgpomGWesly £asuge; Poe.662 443rhan 1uaton .S Vt
Robe's; Apaa ovaasMament. ud

4th
BIG WEEK!

Dial 2-6264

EI r I Gif_

r 1I F

WEDNESDAY
Winner of 10
Academy Awardst

'BEST PICTURE!"
"Greatest picture of the
Year!"-Harrison Carroll,
Los Angeles Herald &
Express
"Nothing Short of Spectac-
ular! Downright Electrify-
ing!"-Sandra Sanders,
Philadelphia Daily News
"One of the Most Sensa-
tional, Exciting Films of
This or Any Other Year!"
-james O'Neill, Jr., STARRING
Washington Daily News NATALIE WOOD
RICHARD BEYMER
RUSS TAMBLYN
* THURSDAY * AND RITA MORENO

I

'West Side Stgry' Is a Ci-
ema Masterpiece! The Per-
formances Are Terrific!"
-Bosley. Crowther,
New York Times
"An All-Star Blockbuster!"
-Justin Gilbert,
New York Daily Mirror
"A Superb Accomplishment!
So Triumphant That One
Is Stunned By Its Success!"
-Paine Knickerbocker,
San Francisco Chronicle

"THE CHAPMAN
REPORT"

Shows Today at
2:00-6:40 and 9:25
Mon.-Wed. at 2 and 8 P.M.
Nights & Sun. $1.25

I

I ll

I

LOOKING
FOR SOMEONE?
Everybody's going to

S.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
DISNEY PROGRAM
Alice in Wonderland
COLOR
Plus Disney Vintage Cartoons

b
V \

o'brien and

I

amesn

"BARTHOLOMEW
FAIR"
NOVEMBER 28-DECEMBER 1
Lydia Mendelssohn-Seats $1.50 and 2.00

MORAL CRISIS in the SOUTH
a discussion with:

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