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November 17, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'URDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

in anm m riV W"

URDY, OVEBER17,196 TH MIHIGN IAIJ

PAGETHREEJL~

I

Indian

Battle

Rages

In Northeastern Area

-4,

Fltacks Cites.
Peace Stand
Helpfulness
By PHILIP SUTIN
Campaigning on a peace plat-
form did not help or hurt the so-
called "peace candidates" in the
recent election, Richard Flacks,
Grad, director of Students for a
Democratic Society's peace proj-
ect, .said,
Thomas Payne, the unsuccessful
aspirant of Michigan's Second
Congressional District seat and
one of these candidates, declared
that his peace stand helped him.
"It gave people concerned about
the cold war something to identify
with and made them excited about
the election. It brought out peo-
ple to help who would have other-
wise not worked in the election,"
Payne explained.
Three Win
Three peace candidates won in
California while others, not close-
ly identified with the peace move-
ment, but inclined in that direc-
Ftion, also won.
Viewing election trends, Flacks
concluded that "Jingoism and
warhawkism are not effective cam-
paign weakons." He noted that
those who supported the Cuban
invasion, such as Sen. Homer
Capehart (R-Ind) and Michigan
GOP congressman-at-large candi-
date Alvin Bentley lost.
"The people opposed candidates
who argued for a major disruption
of the ordinary way of life and
tlh' basic ..spiration for security,"
Flacks explained.
Outside Party
Por a similar reason, peace can-
didates running on a strong plat-
form outside the two-party system
also lost. Independent Massachu-
setts senatorial candidate H. Stu-
art Hughes was beaten badly be-
cause of his disruptive approach,
he added.
Where a peace candidate was of
the majority party in the district,
the peace issue was not a liability,
he said and cited the victories of
Robert Kastenmeier of Wisconsin,
despite Birch attacks, and Rep.
William Ryan (D-NY).
World News
Round up
By The Associated Press
FORT PIERCE, Fla.-Troops of
the Old Ironsides 1st Armored Di-
vision swept ashore shortly before
noon on the beaches of Hutchin-
sons Island yesterday and plunged
the first war games of the Cuban
crisis into high gear.

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AP Wirephoto
TWO BATTLES-Both India and Communist China announced
major battles raging at each end of the disputed McMahon Line
in India's Northeast Frontier Agency Friday. An Indian spokes-
man said the Chinese launched a massive attack near Walong at
the end of the frontier.
Saturn Rocket Scores
Third Straight Success
CAPE CANAVERAL (1)-The great Saturn rocket scored its third
straight test flight success yesterday and the United States mounted
another rung on the ladder to the moon.
With its massive eight-engine power plant fully fueled for the
first time, the 162-foot, 550-ton monster sent a thunderclap rolling
across the Cape as it soared aloft on a flight of four minutes and 55
seconds. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration reported

Reds Launch
New Attack
Near Walong
Call Town Defense
To Oil Producer State
NEW DELHI OP)-Indian and
Red Chinese troops fought sharp
battles yesterday on the northeast
front of India's undeclared border
war.
A defense ministry spokesman
said the Indian forces were hold-
ing their ground against what he
called a massive Chinese counter-
attack.
Red Chinese broadcasts heard in
Tokyo said the Communist forces
were striking back after the In-
dians had laid down a heavy artil-.
lery barrage to cover troops ad-
vancing on Chinese border guards
near Wolang.
The village of Walong, 15 miles
west of Burma, is a key defensive
area for Indian forces. Its fall to
the Chinese could give the Com-
munists a natural passage down
the banks of the Luhit River into
major oil producing areas in In-
dia's Assam state.
A defense ministry spokesman
said the Chinese "attacked on a
massive scale" and in superior
numbers to the north and west of
Walong.
"The Indian invaders opened
concentratedaartillery bombard-
ments against Chinese frontier
guards, firing more than 1800
rounds," a Peiping broadcast said.
"At the same time, they unleashed
powerful attacks from various di-
rections on the Chinese frontier
guards."
. The Chinese broadcast mention-
ed fighting also at Towang, about
300 miles west of Wolang.
Thirty-five United Nations dele-
gations discussed the fighting last
night but parted after two hours
without deciding on any joint ac-
tion.
Diplomats who attended the pri-
vate meeting said Ghana asked the
group to examine proposals that
India and Red China cease fire,
withdraw their forces to the line
of Sept. 8, create a demilitarized
zone between and negotiate for
settlement of their border dispute.
Red China has turned down an
Indian bid for such a cease-fire
and withdrawal, and the two coun-
tries have been unable to agree
on the preconditions for negotia-
tions.
Ghanian Ambassador Alex Quai-
son-Sackey, the informants re-
ported, suggested that members of
the group consult their govern-
ments on Ghana's proposals with
the object of having the group or
the governments, individually or
collectively, present them to Pei-
ping and New Delhi.

Forces
To Leave
Thailand
BANGKOK (,) - American
ground combat forces are being
withdrawn from Thailand - but
stand ready to rush back to this
pro-Western southeast Asian king-
dom in the event a new emergency
arises.
Prime Minister Marshal Sarit
Thanarat gave his approval to the
pullout, declaring the United
States troops had "greatly con-
tributed to the strengthening and
the stability of the region.'
President John F. Kennedy or-
dered a task force to Thailand last
May when the country faced a
threat from Communists fighting
for power in neighboring Laos,
United States Marines, who spear-
headed the invasion-by-invitation,
were. withdrawn after establish-
ment of a coalition regime in Vien-
tiane with East-West pledges at
Geneva to respect Laos' neutral-
ity and independence but battle-
ready GI's remained.
In Washington, United States
officials said the withdrawal of
American combat ground forces in
Thailand had long been under dis-
cussion but they were not pulled
out during the Cuban crisis in
fear it might be misinterpreted as
United States , abandonment of
Asia.
A United States spokesman said
that although some 2300 ground
combat troops are going back to
Hawaii, American Air Force units,
Army engineers and a Seabee
heavy construction battalion will
remain. Also staying are men to
take care of heavy combat equip-
ment-including tanks-that will
be left behind, under United States
control.

PARIS (P)-The United States
pledged its support yesterday for
an integrated European nuclear
force within the framework of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion to head off "proliferation" of
purely national nuclear forces.
George W. Ball, undersecretary
of state, told the closing session
of the eighth annual NATO par-
liamentarians' conference that
Washington would give "serious
consideration" to a genuinely mul-
tilateral European ballistic missile
force, fully coordinated with the
other deterrent forces of NATO.
In this he was reiterating in a
more positive form what McGeorge
Bundy, President John F. Kenne-
dy's special assistant for national
security affairs, recently told an
Atlantic Treaty Association meet-
ing in Copenhagen, to the effect
U.S. To Begin
Construction
on Titan III
LOS ANGELES (A)-Signing of
contracts for America's new space
workhorse, the long awaited superl
rocket Titan III, was announced
yesterday by Air Force Secretary
Eugene M. Zuckert.
Zuckert said the Defense De-
partment has approved Dec. 1 as
"go ahead" day for starting what
he called "actual wheel turning
and tin bending" development of
the rocket that will boost the X-20
Dynasoar aerospace vehicle, among
other jobs.
An Air Force spokesman said
the contract to develop large solid
rockets which will be strapped on
the sides of a liquidI fuel Titan II
missile in the Titan III configura-
tion was also awarded.

NATO CONFERENCE:
Ball Offers Nuclear Force

1

that the United States is willing to
share its nuclear responsibility
with a unified European force.
Pass Resolution
The conference passed many
resolutions including one introduc-
ed by Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY)
which called for a conference of
American, Canadian, Latin Ameri-
can and Western European gov-
ernments sometime next year to
map the economic development of
Central and South America.
Ball said that while a European
nuclear contribution , "from a
strictly military standpoint," is not
urgently needed, the United States
would understand if a unified Eu-
rope wished to play a larger role
in nuclear defense.
He said it is not up to the Unit-
ed States to say how a European
force should be manned, financed,
or organized.
U.S. Responsibility
"But it is a proper responsibil-
ity of the United States, which
has had so much experience in the
nuclear field, to make available to
others our information and ideas
with respect to the characteristics
and capabilities of a multilateral
force," he added.
In reply to a question from one
British delegate, who asked if the
American government would sell
nuclear weapons to Europe, or help
with technical knowledge in their
manufacture, Ball said the United
States would give "sympathetic at-
tention" to any European proposal
provided that the European force
was multinational and manned on
a multinational basis.
Duplication, Ball said, referring
to national deterrent forces, is
"neither wise nor desirable." He
stressed that Europe's participation
must be fully coordinated with the
American effort. Within these con-
ditions, it now is Europe's move.
"In making available the exper-

<"

GEORGE W. BALL
.. missile force
ience and knowledge we have ac-
quired (in the nuclear field), we
cannot prejudice what form Amer-
ican help would take. It is up to
the Europeans to say what they
really want," he went on.
One member of the American
delegation said the United States
administration is ready to seek an
amendment to the McMahon Act
to permit export of warheads or
nuclear know-how.
Group To Probe
Domestic Corps
WASHINGTON (P) -President
John F. Kennedy is expected to
call upon four cabinet members
for an appraisal of a proposed
domestic equivalent of the Peace
Corps, the Washington Post said
last night.

i

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Two Contend
For Position
LANSING (M)-Who will be the
next speaker of the House during
the administration of Gov.-elect
George Romney?
Leading contenders for the posi-
tion appear to be the present ma-'
jority floor leader, Allison Green
(R-Kingston) and speaker pro
tem Wilfred G. Bassett (R-Jack-
son).
Green appears to have the edge
but Bassett is making a determin-
ed campaign for the job.
Neither man is classified as,
"moderate" Republican, like the
Senate "moderates" with whom
Romney is expected to work close-
ly.
Green's history as a House lead-
er shows more flexibility, however,
and Bassett's shows more conserv-
atism. Romney's legislative pro-
gram is expected to include tax
revision and Bassett has consist-
ently fought every income tax plan

that preliminary study of data in-
dicated the Saturn had performed
perfectly.
It was the longest flight yet for
the rocket which in later develop-
ment will start American space-
men on the way to the moon.
As on the first two tests, both
successful, only the first stage was
ignited in the world's largest
known rocket. The vehicle generat-
ed a thrust of 1.3 million pounds,
equal to 30 million horsepower.
The flight ended abruptly as
planned at an altitude of 104 miles
hwen a radio signal from the
ground exploded dynamite charges
that ripped the rocket to shreds.
The deliberate detonation spew-
ed 23,000 gallons of ballast water
into the icy ionosphere and a mas-
sive cloud of ice particles blossom-
ed like a parachute, then dissi-
pated within seconds. The water
was aboard to simulate the weight
of upper stages to be flown on fu-
ture Saturns.
Scientists hope camera and
other tracking studies of the cloud
will provide information on at-
mosphere physics-

SANTO DOMINGO - Haiti's
government yesterday ordered de-
portation of Bishop Paul Robert
and cited as one reason his cam-
paign against voodoo in Haiti.
Three other French-born Roman
Catholic clergymen also were or-
dered deported. Reports from the
Haitian capital, Port Au Prince,
indicated President Francois Du-,
valier was reopening his long-
standing feud with the church.
BOSTON-Edward W. Brooke,
the first Negro to win statewide
office in Massachusetts, defeated
his Democratic rival for attorney
general, Francis E. Kelly, by 259,-
355 votes in a total of more than 2
million, official returns showed
yesterday.
"* M*
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy will make a hop-skip
tour of key Air Force, space and
nuclear centers in the Far West
next month, the White House an-
nounced yesterday.
NEW YORK-The stock market
struggled out of an early decline
yesterday and ground out a mod-
erate advance in early trading.
Motors, due to the booming auto-
mobile sales, and aircrafts, ex-
pected to benefit from increased
defense spending, led- the ad-
vance.

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YEARBOOK
" Send in your order for the 1963
'Ensian and have your book reserved
for you when it is published.

I
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m mwms m inmm n m " Inmm wee~ sa w ts wwmin m m m mm. mm mm in i
1 B
1 1
Enclosed find $5.00 (check or money order only) for one:
i - (Payable to Michiganension, 420 Maynard St.)1
a 1963 'Ensian. Sorry, we cannot bill you at a later date.
1 1
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Your receipt will be sent when your order comes in.
1 1
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.................
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Y:

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
1 1 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours ore Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class on Christian Ethics.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
SUNDAY EVENING
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, "This I Believe."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewod
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2.2756

rHE'

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:0.. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kiaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
9:30 and 11:00a.m. "Why Thanksgiving?"
Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
10:20-10:40 a.m. Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs,
Bach's "Christmas Oratoral."j
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.;
Crib-9th grade.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, evening pro-
gram, 7:30 p.m.

FIRST
and

State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus, Ministers.
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Morning Worship, "To
Be Found Faithful," sermon by Dr. Rupert.
The service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM) 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, Pine Room. Series sub-
ject, "Encounters With Other Living Reli-
gions. Religions of India." Topic: "The Sihk
Religion."
7:00 p.m. - Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Topic: Report on State Conference.
MONDAY
8:00-1 1:00 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-Student Cabinet luncheon, Pine
Room.
5:15-7:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations,
dinner.
7:30 p.m.-Non-credit course in Religion, by
Tony Stoneburner, Wesley Lounge.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, follow-
ed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
SUNDAY EVENING PROGRAMS
FOR DECEMBER:
Dec. 2-Dr. Rosella Duerksen on "What Might
the New Methodist Hymnal Be."
Dec. 9-Christmas Party, "Hanging of the
Greens."
Dec. 16-Christmas Program: Drama, Dance,
Carols.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(TheDLutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15-Thanksgiving
Sunday Sermon by the Pastor, "Eucharist-
The Giving of Thanks." (Holy Communion)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15-Bible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00-Gamma Delta Supper-Pro-
gram, commemorating the 25th anniversary
of the U-M chapter of Lutheran students.
Thursday at 9:45 a.m.-Thanksgiving Day Ser-
vice. Sermon by the Vicar, "Thanksgiving:
A Joyful Obligation."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate

METHODIST CHURCH
WESLEY FOUNDATION

~~ATZ rAJ

Narr

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SHOP at
FOLLETT'S
PhotoDent

l

AA Address
Mailing instructions: $1.00 additional charge if book is to be mailed

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ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Rov, nand Nancv Mc~Nair, House Directors

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon tonic for Sunday. Nov. 18. will be:

9:30
10:00
II -nn

SUNDAY
a.m. Worship Service.
a.m. Bible Study.
n m ~.1.111. T I^v^ir I n1

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