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November 15, 1962 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, "VERMER 15, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. NOVEMBER iL ThE~2

Fi.ai j,;V R / LYLLY 1Vt LVVM

AAU, NCAA Explore Ways To Install Pact

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The AAU and
NCAA, their war of words cut off
before it reached the shooting'
stage, began exploring ways and
means yesterday of implementing
their day-old truce.
The two organizations, feuding
for the past two and a half years
over the control of amateur ath-
letics in the United States, formed
a coalition Tuesday in a last-diten
effort to sign a peace treaty.

> i

But how much authority the co-
alition will have still is secret, no
details have been announced be-
cause each faction must get the
truce, which will assure a strong
Olympic team in 1964, ratified by
its membership.
Everything should be settled two
weeks from yesterday when the
AAU begins its annual convention
in Detroit.
Need Approval.
Ratification by the general
membership-of both the NCAA and

AAU is regarded as a mere formal-
ity. The NCAA, instead of waiting
for its convention in Los Angeles
in January, probably will take a
mail vote.
There are several conclusions to
be drawn from the truce which will
last at least until after the Tokyo
Olympics.
No Difference
For one thing, the NCAA-backed
United States Track and Field
Federation, which had demanded
equal sanctioning privileges with
the AAU, will confine its activi-
ties to collegiate competition. This,
in effect, is no different from the
past, except that the name will
be changed.
For another, the AAU will re-
main the sole sanctioning agent of
all open competition, and will
sanction all athletes for the Olym-
pics. This also is how things have

stood since before the turn of the
century.
Originally, it was understood
that the coalition would do the
sanctioning internally while the
AAU would handle international
affairs. Instead, the AAU keeps it
all.
All that is known definitely. Just
where the coalition comes in its
vague. It could turn into a paper
outfit with committees from the
AAU and NCAA meeting occasion-
ally to talk over their problems.
Where does the NCAA profit
from the deal?
NCAA Gains
While it could not be confirmed,
the NCAA undobutedly got what
it was after from the start-equal
representation on the AAU'S For-
eign Relations Committee and a
spot on the executive board. The
NCAA always has been outnum-

bered on the Foreign Relations
Committee and never has been
permitted on the powerful execu-
tive committee.
The most immediate threat, if
the conflict had continued, would
be to spoil the indoor track season.
The federation had scheduled a
national championship to conflict
with the AAU national event.
The truce does not include bask-
etball and gymnastics, the other
two sports around which the feud
revolves. However, officials close to
both parties said agreements could
be worked out along the same lines
as track and field.

IGRID SELECTIONS
"It's a hard life being Sports Editor," said Tom (Sweat-on-the-
brow) Webber. "To uphold my office, I have to be number one
selector week after week. This means working out a system.
"Last week I led the staff with 15 right guesses. You wanna
know my system?
It goes like this. Every Wednesday I see what time my room-
mates get up. This gives me three games. (The home team of the
two teams listed at the time they get up are the winners.)
"Then I count the number of times I have to bend over before
I can reach my shoes to tie them. Dividing this by the number of
minutes I burn my toast and then multiplying that answer by the
number of dirty dishes I have to wash. Then I just forget the whole
mess, and throw the coffee grounds at the sheet. The teams that
have grounds on them are the winners."
Following this method or not, the winner will receive two tickets
to the Michigan, currently showing "Gigot," and a subscription to the
Football News.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

|

NHL Standings
Toronto 4, Montreal 2
New York 6, Boston 2
Chicago 4, Detroit 2

I

Michigan S istory

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
I0.

MICHIGAN at Iowa (score)
Wisconsin at Illinois
Purdue at Minnesota
Michigan St. at Northwestern
Oregon at Ohio State
Pittsburgh vs. Army at N.Y.
Princeton at Yale
Columbia at Pennsylvania
Florida State at Florida
Alabama at Georgia Tech

11. 1
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Clemson at Maryland
Virginia at No. Carolina State
Tulane at Vanderbilt
Missouri at Oklahoma
Texas A&M at Rice
Texas at Texas Christian
Baylor at Air Force
Utah State at Utah
UCLA at Washington
Ouachita at Millsaps

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an-
other in the continuing series deal-
ing with the football history of the
Michigan Wolverines. In today's ar-
ticle, the Wolverine's jinx over the
Iowa Hawkeyes, who have only beat-
en Michigan once since 1924, is dis-
cussed.)
By BILL BULLARD
Michigan's Wolverines have the
closest thing to a jinx that there
is in college football over the Iowa
Hawkeyes.
Iowa will be attempting for the
fifth time this Saturday to defeat
IMichigan at Iowa City. In the
overall series, Michigan has won
16, lost three, and tied two games.
One of the greatest of Michigan
victories over Iowa was in 1954.
The Hawkeyes came to Ann Arbor
fourth ranked in the nation and

went back to Iowa City defeated
14-13.
Two Quickies
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's Wol-
verines gave up two touchdowns
to the Hawkeyes in the first eight
minutes of the game. But for the
rest of the game Michigan com-
pletely outplayed the invading
team.
The Wolverines pushed over
their first touchdown with two
seconds to go in the first quarter
on a 58-yd scoring drive. Midway
in the second quarter Michigan
scored its second touchdown to
secure the victory.
A star of that game was a soph-
omore left end, Ron Kramer. Kra-
mer, destined to become an All-
American in his junior and senior
years, caught the winning touch-
down and kicked the two conver-
sions.

back Jim Maddock lofted a pass to
Kramer on the five-yd. line and
Kramer fell into the endzone for
the TD.
The Hawkeyes threatened for
the last time near the end of the
second quarter. Iowa's march to
the Michigan goal was interrupted
by Tom Maentz on the Michigan
11-yd. line. During the second
half, Iowa did not penetrate Mich-
igan territory farther than the
48-yd. line.
Stars Out
This victory was won without
the services of star Michigan backs
Tony Branoff and Lou Baldacci.
It was all the more surprising
since the Wolverine performances
in the first two games were un-
impressive. The Wolverines had
beaten a weak Washington team
14-0 and were defeated by Army,
26-7.
It is this background that Iowa
will fight against Saturday. The
worst drubbing an Iowa team ever
received from the Wolverines was
a 107-0 slaughter in 1902. Michi-
gan has outscored Iowa in the
series, 432-220.
But in recent years the Hawk-
eyes have done better against the
Wolverines than the overall record
would suggest. In 1957, Iowa tied
Michigan 21-21 which was the first
game since 1924 that hadn't been
won by Michigan. Iowa decisively
conquered Michigan the following
season, 37-14. But in 1961, the
next game between the two teams,
Michigan turned back Iowa 23-14.
Frosh Team
To Preview
1963 Season
Michigan's football hopes for
1963 will go on parade this after-
noon when Coach Don Dufek pits
two picked freshman s q u a d s
against each other in a regulation
game at 2:30 p.m., in the.Wolverine
Stadium.
Rated by sideline critics as the
best Maize and Blue frosh squad
in several seasons, Dufek called it
a "better-than-average group that
has done well in its own scrim-
mages, as well as against the var-
sity and reserves."
Dufek, assisted by the frosh staff
of George Mans, end coach; Frank
Uible, guards and centers; Guy
Curtis, tackles and defense; Jack
Lehr, tackles and offense, and Bill
Dougall, backs, will divide up the
two squads and put them through
their paces.

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