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November 08, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DATYX

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____ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ____ __-- .. ~ v~aM~sTHURSDAY, NOVE
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USNSA:

International Contacts
Exchange Student Ideas

(Continued from Page 1)
groups is the World Assembly of
Youth which acts on all problems
affecting youth, including stu-
dents.
USNSA is also associated with
the United Nations' Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organiza-
tion, which contributes to a broad
effort to solve educational, sci-
entific and cultural problems.
Lastly, in order to facilitate in-
ternational student sport competi-
tions, the association has joined
the Federation Internationale du
Sport Universitaire.
. Exchange Program
Members of USNSA also partici-
pate in other international activi-
ties. One of these is the Student
Exchange Program, which some-
times operates under the Fulbright
and Smith-MundIt Acts.
USNSA has developed exchange
relations with other national un-
Engineering Body
Chooses Members
The new members at large of
the Engineering Council are: Jim;
Amend, '64E; William Busch, '64E;3
Fred Conn, '65E; Ken Hoedman,
'63E; Don MacRitchie, '64E; Ron;
MacRitchie, '64E; George John-
son, '65E, and Warren Uhler, '63E.

ions of students, including a se-
ries of seminars in Germany, fra-
ternal delegations to regions
abroad and hospitality visits by
national union leaders to the as-
sociation's congresses.
USNSA has found that ex-
change programs vary in worth,
some being "good" while others
involve "bad" consequences. Long-
term academic exchanges have
proved to be more productive and
cost little more than short-term
programs.
Leadership Project
The association coordinates a
Foreign Student Leadership proj-
ect which makes it possible for
student leaders to study for a year
at American or foreign universi-
ties. Student Government Council
sponsored a foreign student at the
University from 1957-59.
USNSA also sponsors an educa-
tional travel program, which oper-
ates low-cost student tours abroad.
Another outlet for the associa-
tion's international programming
is the International Affairs Com-
mission, which encourages the cre-
ation of internationally-oriented
projects on American campuses.
At this summer's congress, the
association sent a letter of con-
gratulations to Algerian students
concerning Algerian independence
and the student movement to have
Arabic language and history
taught in the schools.

T-o Present
Productions
By Students
"The Hunted," a play by Ed-
ward Senior, and "In the Suds," a
medieval French farce translated
by Bernard and Rose Hewitt, will
be presented at 4:10 p.m. today
in the Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
by the student laboratory play
program of the speech department.
"The Hunted" is a psychological
character study of a man who re-
bels against change in people and
in things. In his torment, he finds
some comfort in a pathetic rela-
tionship with a young imbecile
girl. The man, Brant, finally kills
the girl so that she, in her sim-
plicity, will never change.
"In the Suds" is the farcical
tale of a henpecked husband who
chafes at the mercy of a shrewish
wife and mother-in-law.
Group To Hold
Talk on Cuba
The Ann Arbor Women for Peace
will sponsor an open meeting on
the Cuban crisis at 8 p.m. today
at the Friends Center, 1416 Hill
St.
The speaker will be Jack Hamil-
ton, director of news and commen-
tary on radio station WDTM-FM,
Detroit.

COMMUNIST CHINA:
Traditions Remain Amorphous

<"

By THOMAS DRAPER
"There has been no final jelling
of tradition and modern develop-
ments in Communist China," Prof.
Benjamin L Schwartz of Harvard
University said Tuesday night.
Schwartz noted that though the
programs and policies of Red
China are usually explained in
terms of Marxist-Leninist ideology,
some feel that they can be inter-
preted strictly in terms of historic
dynastic change.
The Communist regime in China
is merely a return to consolidated
totalitarianism, Schwartz declar-
ed. He said that under both Com-
munism and Confuscionism there
is a single ideology with truth
administered by the state.
Contrary to Marxist ideology,
the regime of Mao Tse-Tung has
a positive orientation towards tra-
dition.
Interpret Traditions
"Chinese Communists have tried
to take action by re-interpreting
traditions. They refilter the cul-
ture of the country through Marx-
ist-Leninist phrases," Schwartz
said, "because they have nation-
alistic pride in tradition without
claiming any of its values."
"Mao really believes that they
are going to have Communism,"
Schwartz said. The Chinese image
of Communism is a bucolic notion
of utopia that is not based on an
abundance of goods. The image in-
cludes the concept of an historic

WINSTON
NoshviIlie,

G. EVANS
Tennessee

process moving inevitably to an
ultimate Communist utopia.
Compatible
"Mao's form of Communism is
completely compatible with Chi-
nese nationalists," S c h w a r t z
stressed. Marx treats nationalism
as something that is about to die.
Lenin considered nationalism as
a passing phase of the bourgeois
that is to be harnessed, and that
those regimes that came to power
Senior Society
Taps Sixteen
In an early morning tapping
ceremony, Senior Society, senior
independent women's honorary, to-
day added 16 new members to its
roster.
The women were chosen on the
basis of participation in campus
activities and academic achieve-
ment. Those tapped included: Bet-
ty Erman, '63; Bonnie Ginsberg,
'63; Diane Hirsch, '63; Marion
Jackson, '63; Linda Joel, '63; Nan-
cy Johnson, '63Ed; Nancy Lucas,
'63, and Cynthia Neu, '63.
Also tapped were: Ellen Silver-
man, '63; Anne Speer, '63M; Ju-
dith Van Hamm, '63A&D; Judith
Hyman, '63Ed; Joan Schloessinger,
'63; Lena Tennison, '63N; Nancy
Kingsland, '63N, and Sylvia Ber-
liner, '63.

in 1948 were nationalistic. "In
China there is a unique marriage
of nationalism and Communism,"
Schwartz concluded.
.Peking remains as a symbol of
the old. Although a new city is
being built, the Communists nave
not tampered with the old. This
trend continues throughout Com-
munist China as the Reds have
not changed the old, but modified
it to fit their own uses.

THE GREAT AGE TO COME

TONIGHT at 8
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Sponsored by U. of M. Baha'i Student Group
for free copies of THE LORD OF THE NEW AGE
and THE PATH TO GOD write
Baha'i Assembly, 418 Lawrence St.
or phone 663-2904 or 668-9085
ANN ARBOR FOLK & JAZZ SOCIETY
Presents

will be discussed by

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Austin Diamond CO.
1209 South U.
663-7151

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A sold-out Town Hall and an audience that overflowed onto the
stage greeted Carlos! Montoya at his concert. An evening of
captivating variety. -New York Times
"The most phenomenal music this reviewer has ever heard . .
-New Orleans }imes-Picayune
"Carlos Montoya literally stopped the show with virtuoso guitar
playing that seemed to evoke the very soul of Spain!"
-Chicago Daily Tribune
" All the superlatives that have been bestowed upon Carlos Montoya
are still true. He is a magnificent artist with unbelievable .magic
in his fingers." -Pittsburgh Press
SATURDAY, NOV. 10-8:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR HIGH AUDITORIUM
GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
All Seats Reserved: Main Floor $3,50, $2.50; Bale. $2.50, $1.75

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the Uftiversity of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
Day Calendar
4:00 p.m.-Depts. of Mathematics and
Physics and Institute of Science and
Technology Lecture-George W. Mack-
ey, Professor of Mathematics, Harvard
Univ., "Mathematical Aspects of Quan-
tum Mechanics": Aud. B, Angell Hall.
4:15 p.m.-Prof. John Myhill, Dept. of
Philosophy, Stanford Univ., will speak
on "Generalization of the Nation of a
Self-Reproducing Machine," Rm. 429
Mason Hall.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Vera Baranovskaya and Nikolai Bata-
lov in "Pudhovkin's Mother"; short,
"What Who How": Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Professional Theatre Pro-
gram Great Star Series-Helen Hayes
and Maurice Evans in "A Program for
Two Players": Hill Aud.
On Thurs., Nov. 8, 4 to 6 p.m., Prof.
Wolfgang F. Stolper, Dept. of Econom-
ics, will speak on the topic, "The Prob-
lem of Investment Criteria Related to
the Size of Development Program, In-
teraction in the Economy and General
Economic policy." The meeting will be
held in Rm. 301, Economics Bldg.
Theonecat strikes

General Notices
Students, College of Engineering: The
final day for DROPPING COURSES
WITHOUT RECORD will be Fri., Nov.
9. A course may be dropped only with
the permission of the program adviser
after conference with the instructor.
Students, College of Engineering: The
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Nov.
9, 8:30 p.m., Speaker: Sol I. Littman,
Dir., Mich. Council of Anti-Defamation
League, "The Radical Right"; Nov. 14,
8 p.m., Speaker: Prof. M. Dyck, "A Di-
vergent Series of Moral Paradoxes"; 1429
Hall. All welcome.
* . *
Christian Science Organization, Week-
yl Meeting, Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m., 528 D SAB."
Congregational Disciples E & R Guild,
Worship Service, Nov. 8, 12:10-12:40
p.m., 1st Congr. Church, Douglas Chap-
el, William St. Entrance.
* * *
Deutscher Verein, Kaffe Stunde, Nov.
8, 3-5 p.m., 4072 FB.
* * .
India Students Assoc., Tickets for
Deepavali Banquet are on sale in the
International 'Center Lounge between
6:30-7:30 p.m. Can also be had from
Jagdish Chandra Janveja, treasurer,
NO 2-4211.
* . , ,
International Students Association,
Square Dance, Nov. 9, 8:30-12 a.m., S.
Quad. Dining Rm. No. 2. Caller: Conrad
Eichnor.
* * *
Kappa Phi, Pledge Meeting, Nov. 8, 7
p.m., Youth Room; Initiation, Nov. 8,
7:30 p.m., Green Room.
* s*"
Newman Club, Monte Carlo Party: "A
Night at Loules," Nov. 9, 8:30 p.m., 331
Thompson.
* * *
Young Democrats, Executive Board
Meeting to interview and endorse can-
didates for SGC, members invited to
speak and ask questions, Nov. 8, 7 p.m.,
3511 SAB.

final day for REMOVAL OF INCOM-
PLETES will be Fri., Nov. 9. Petitions
for extension of time must be on file
in the Recorder's Office on or before
Fri., Nov. 9.
Doctoral Candidates who expect to re-
ceive degrees in Feb., 1963, must have
at least three bound copies (the orig-
inal in -a- "spring binder") of their
dissertation in the office of the Grad-
uate School by Fri., Dec. 7. The report
of the doctoral committee on the final
oral examination must be filed with the
Recorder of the Grad School together
with two copies of the thesis, which is
ready in all** respects for publication
not later than Mon., Jan. 7.
At the Request of the 1962 General
Co-Chairman of MUSKET, Women's Ju-
diciary has extended hours on Sat., Dec.
1, until 1:30 a.m.
Principal-Freshman Conference: Fresh-
men who recently received letters no-
tifying them of appointments to con-
fer with counselors from their high
schools Thurs. morning are requested
to be punctual.
James Wright Hunt Scholarship: Un-
dergrad students who live in Duluth,
Minn., may be qualified for the Jamest
Wright Hunt. Scholarship Program
which has a stipend at The Univ. of
lich. for $1,000 a year. Qualified and
interested students should inquire at
the Scholarship Office, 2011 Student
Activities Bldg.
Because of a printer's delay, delivery
of the Faculty-Staff Directory has been
postponed until Nov. 15 (approximate-
ly). Distribution will be made as soon
as the books are delivered.
Faculty, College of Lit., Science and
the Arts: Midsemester reports are due
Fri., Nov. 9, for those students whose
standing at midsemester is "D" or "E."
The green report cards for freshmen
and sophomores should be sent to the
Counselors Office for Freshmen and

Sophomores, 1213 Angell Hall; white.
report cards for Juniors and seniors to
the Counselors Office for Juniors and
Seniors, 1223 Angell Hall.
Students not registered in this Col-
lege but who elected L. S. & A. courses
should be reported to the school or col-,
lege in which they are registered.,
The Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship
amounting to $195.53 (interest on the
endowment fund) is available to un-
dergrad single women who are wholly
or partially self-supporting and who do
not live in Univ. residence halls or
sorority houses. Girls with better than
average scholarship and need will be
considered.
The Lucile B. Conger Pcholarship is
offered to undergrad women on the
basis of academic performance, contri-
bution to Univ. life and financial need;
the stipend is variable.
* " *
Application blanks are available at
the Alumnae Council Office, Mich.
League, and should be filed by Nov. 29.
Awards will be granted for use during
the second semester, 1962-63 and will be
announced Dec. 15.
StdetEvents
SStudentGovernment Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Assembly Association, & IQC-Assem-
bly Sing Tryouts, Dec. 3, 7:00-10:00 p.m.,
Aud. D, Angell Hall.
Assembly Assoc. & IQC - Assembly
Sing, Dec. 10, 7:00-11:00 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night:
Fri., Nov. 9, 8:00 p.m., Room 2003 An-
gell Hall. Stephen P. Maran will speak
on "The Planet Mercury." After the
lecture the Student Observatory on the
fifth floor of Angell Hall will be open
for inspection and for telescopic ob-
servations of Jupiter, Saturn, and the

Moon. Children welcdryed, but must be
accompanied by adults.
Great Star Series: Helen Hayes and
Maurice Evans, international stage stars,
appear tonight at Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.,
in "A Program for Two Players." a
unique presentation featuring selections
from plays by William Shakespeare.
Students receive a 20 per cent discount
in all price ranges for thisattraction
which is being presented by the Univ.'s
Professional Theatre Program. Students
who are APA Season Members receive
40 discount on tickets and regulareAPA
Season Members receive a 20 per cent
discount. Tickets are still available at
Hill Aud. Box Office: Orchestra $4.50,
4.00, 3.50; 1st balcony $3.50, 3.00, 2.50;
2nd Balcony $2.50, 2.00, 1.50.
Placement
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Beginning the week, of Nov. 12, the
following schools will be at the Bureau
to interview candidates.
MON., NOV. 12-
Warren Woods, Mich.-Early Elem.
THURS., NOV. 15--
Katonah, N.Y.-Elem.; Dir, of Elem.
Curr.; Comm., Math.
FRI., NOV. 16-
Cleveland, Ohio-All Fields.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB, 663-1511, Ext.
3547.
(Continued on Page 3)

I

Tickets on sale at
DISC SHOP, 1210 S. University; RECORD CENTER, 304
DISCOUNT RECORDS, 337 S. Main

S. Thayer;

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again

at Trueblood

Auditorium this Sat-
urday . . . cheap -

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS TONIGHT
STRAIGHT FROM
TODAY'S HEADLINES...
The true story of the
incredible "freedom tunnel"!

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TODAY
AT
7-9 P.M.

1

DIAL
8-6416

vote
on

90e - cheap

. I - .

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Cinema quild
PRESENTS

"A Great French Film!"
--BOSLEY CROWTHER, N.Y. Times
ANDRE CAYATTE'S
Tomorro 0wM
TTO
IS
turn
Golden Lion
VENICEFILMFESTIVAL
1st prize
NICOLE COURCEL
GEORGES RIVIERE
CORDULA TRANT0W
"An Exceptional
-Herold-Tribune

I

Better Off Out

Thursday and

Friday

Pudhoykin's MOTHER
Vera Baranovskaya, Nikolai Batalov.
One of the 12 Best Films of All Time-Brussels
Film Critic Poll, 126 film historians from 26 nations
Based on the novel of Maxim Gorki about the
1905 rebellion in Czarist Russia.
SHORT:
What Who How-Award of Distinction
Saturday and Sunday
LIFEBOAT
Tallulah Bankhead, John Hod ak,
Walter Slezak, William Bendix,
Hume Cronyn

I

FRIDAY
at REGULAR PRICES
JACKIE
GLEASON
*Pronouncedi GEE-GO

I

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£I~ ~ ~E~EE~ - NED

I

Winner of lOAcademy Awards!
BESTiro:R - WseST ABESTAd"ctin BEST g;,% A* BEST
Costume Desg,
Suppsr cts: - eor 7 BESTS BEST
Moe, E TCnmtgaayB S ound BE Tfilm Editing- (color)
BE TRita(cMlre, BEST__'nom__
________3rd
HELD OVER BIGWEE
AGAIN! t

I

NSA Is Not Representative
NSA issues statements which it claims to be representative of
United States student views. This is not true, for NSA is not a repre-
sentative institution.
Firstly, only one-fifth of U.S. students attend member schools
of NSA. Of 2000 colleges in the U.S. only 400 belong to NSA.
Second, the great majority of delegates to the NSA summer
conferences, where official NSA statements are issued, are elected
by their constituent bodies to serve as student government repre-
sentatives. They are, therefore, not required to express their opinions
on national and international non-student issues when campaigning.
Their views on these issues, then, very well might be quite different
from those of their constituency.
Third, the 35 man National Executive Council of NSA which

In 1925, two great Russian
films appeared - Eisenstein's
Potemkin and Pudovkin's
Mother. Whereas the hero of
Eisenstein's films is the group,
the crowd, the mass, Pudovkin

Pudovkin cuts from his smiling
face to shots of a thawing
mountain stream, of sparkling
waters liberated from their
wintry prison." "Eisenstein's
films," Leon Moussinac has

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